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Operation Checkmate (commando Raid)
Operation Checkmate was the codename for a raid on shipping at Haugesund, Norway
Norway
in April 1943 during the Second World War
Second World War
by British Commandos. The raiding party consisted of seven men of No. 14 (Arctic) Commando who managed to sink one ship using limpet mines. While waiting in hiding for the transport back to the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
they were all captured on the 14. and 15. May 1943 and eventually taken to Sachsenhausen and Belsen Concentration Camps where six of them were executed, victims of the Commando Order. The seventh died of typhus.[1]Contents1 Background 2 Mission 3 Aftermath 4 ReferencesBackground[edit] Operation Checkmate was the last of 12 commando raids on the Norwegian coast during the Second World War.[2] The raiding party assembled for the operation was composed of one officer and six other ranks from No. 14 (Arctic) Commando. The No
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Haugesund
 Haugesund (help·info) (HGSD) is a town and municipality in Rogaland
Rogaland
county, Norway. The town is the main population centre of the Haugaland
Haugaland
region in northern Rogaland. The majority of the population of Haugesund
Haugesund
lives in the main urban area surrounding the city centre, with the northwestern part of the municipality being fairly rural.[2]Contents1 Location 2 Population 3 History3.1 Etymology 3.2 Coat of arms4 Geography 5 Cityscape 6 Transport 7 Government7.1 Municipal council8 Culture8.1 Churches 8.2 Education9 Sports 10 International relations10.1 Twin towns – sister cities11 Notable people 12 See also 13 References 14 External linksLocation[edit] The town is situated on a strategically important sound, the Karmsundet, through which ships could pass without traversing heavy seas
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Bjørn West
IndecisiveNorwegian forces repel German attacks Both sides disengageBelligerents Norway
Norway
(Milorg) GermanyCommanders and leadersCaptain Harald Risnes Lt Fredrik Kayser Lt. Gen Johannes de BoerCasualties and losses6 dead 35[1]–117[2] deadv t eNorwegian Campaigns (1941–45)Claymore Gauntlet Anklet Archery Fritham Musketoon Oslo raid Cartoon Checkmate Attacks on TirpitzSource Tungsten Mascot Goodwood Paravane Obviate CatechismZitronella Leader Finnmark Provident 28 January 1945 Black Friday 9 February 1945 Haglebu Bjørn West Judgement Doomsday Bjørn West was one out of many Milorg
Milorg
bases in German-occupied Norway, located in Matrefjella in Masfjorden. The base was under the direct command of the Norwegian High Command in London
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Operation Paravane
Operation Paravane
Operation Paravane
was a British air raid of World War II
World War II
that inflicted heavy damage on the German battleship Tirpitz. The attack was conducted on 15 September 1944 by 21 Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
heavy bombers, which flew from an airfield in the north of the Soviet Union. The battleship was struck by one bomb, and further damaged by several near misses
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Operation Obviate
Operation Obviate was the RAF Bomber Command attack on the German battleship Tirpitz at Tromsø on 29 October 1944. The attack was foiled by cloud covering the ship at the last minute, and the bombs that were dropped caused only minor damage. Tirpitz would finally be sunk in Operation Catechism two weeks later.Contents1 Background 2 Battleplans 3 Operation 4 Aftermath 5 References and notesBackground[edit] Tirpitz was a Bismarck-class battleship of 42,900 tons, armed with eight 38 cm (15 inch) guns. She was designed to attack merchant shipping in the Atlantic, but the loss of Bismarck and other commerce raiders led to instructions that she should be used for limited sorties only. In early 1942, Tirpitz was sent to northern Norway, where she would remain for most of World War II
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Operation Catechism
TimelineRiver Plate 1st Happy Time HX 72 SC 7 HX 79 HX 84 HX 90 SC 19 BerlinHX 106HG 53 OB 293 HX 112 4 April 1941 OB 318 HX 126 Denmark Strait Bismarck OG 69 OG 71 SC 42 HG 73 SC 48 HG 76 2nd Happy Time Torpedo Alley Neuland ON 67 27 March 1942 OG 82 6 June 1942 HG 84 SL 78 QS 15 SC 94 ON 122 QS 33 ON 127 Laconia SC 100 SC 104 HX 212 SL 125 SC 107 Casablanca ON 144 ON 154 TM 1 SG 19 SC 118 ON 166 UC 1 SC 121 HX 228 UGS 6 HX 229/SC 122 Black MayONS 5 SC 129 SC 130ONS 18/ON 202 SC 143 ONS 20/ON 206 Sept-Îles SL 138/MKS 28 SL 139/MKS 30 SL 140/MKS 31 StonewallBay of BiscayLyme Bay 26 April 1944 13 May 1944 Capture of U-505 HX 300 WEP 3 BX 141 Teardrop Operation Catechism
Operation Catechism
was the last of nine attempts to sink or sabotage the Kriegsmarine
Kriegsmarine
battleship Tirpitz during the Second World War
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Operation Leader
Operation Leader
Operation Leader
was a successful air attack conducted by the United States Navy against German shipping in the vicinity of Bodø, Norway, on 4 October 1943, during World War II. The raid was executed by aircraft flying from the aircraft carrier USS Ranger, which at the time was attached to the British Home Fleet. The American airmen located many German and Norwegian ships in this area, and are believed to have destroyed five and damaged another seven. Two German aircraft searching for the Allied fleet were shot down as well. Three American aircraft were destroyed in combat during the operation, and another crashed while landing. The attack followed a two-year lull in Allied aircraft carrier operations against Norway, and took the German forces by surprise
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Liberation Of Finnmark
Allied victory Finnmark
Finnmark
liberated German withdrawal into Festung NorwegenBelligerents Soviet Union  Norway Naval support:  United Kingdom  Canada Materiel support:  Sweden[1]  GermanyCommanders and leaders Kirill Meretskov Vladimir Shcherbakov Arne Dagfin Dahl[2] Lothar Rendulic Franz BöhmeStrengthSoviet Union: 14th Army Northern Fleet Norway: 3,000+ soldiers & police troops 1,500+ militia 2 corvettes 3 minesweepers Various auxiliary vessels United Kingdom: 3 destroyers Canada: 1 destroyer


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Operation Provident
Operation Provident was carried out during World War II
World War II
by the Home Fleet of the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
in the period 22–29 November 1944. The purpose of the operation was to carry out attacks on enemy shipping on the coast of Norway
Norway
between latitudes 64° 30′ and 69° North. The operation took place under the personal command of the Commander-in-Chief, Home Fleet, Admiral
Admiral
Sir Henry Ruthven Moore, flying his flag in the aircraft carrier HMS Implacable. It is remembered for the destruction of MS Rigel in Norway's worst disaster at sea. The force consisted of two groups, designated Force 7 and Force 8.[1] Force 7 comprised the flagship Implacable, HMS Dido, and six destroyers: HMS Myngs (Captain (D) 23rd Destroyer Flotilla), HMS Scorpion, HMS Scourge, HMCS Sioux, HMS Zephyr and HMCS Algonquin
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Action Of 28 January 1945
The Action of 28 January 1945 was an inconclusive naval battle of the Second World War fought between two British Royal Navy light cruisers and three Kriegsmarine (German navy) destroyers near Bergen, Norway. The battle was both the last of many actions between British and German warships off Norway during the war, and the second-to-last surface engagement to be fought by the Kriegsmarine. It resulted in heavy damage to one of the German destroyers and light damage to another destroyer and both British cruisers. Shortly after midnight on the night of 27/28 January, as the three destroyers of the German 4th Destroyer Flotilla were sailing from northern Norway to the Baltic Sea, they were intercepted by the British cruisers HMS Diadem and Mauritius. In the resulting engagement, the destroyers Z31 and Z34 were damaged by gunfire but the German flotilla outran the slower British ships and escaped
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Black Friday (1945)
On 9 February 1945, a force of Allied Bristol Beaufighter aircraft suffered heavy casualties during an unsuccessful attack on the German destroyer Z33 and its escorting vessels; the operation was labelled "Black Friday" by the surviving Allied aircrew. The German ships were sheltering in a strong defensive position in Førde Fjord, Norway, forcing the Allied aircraft to attack through heavy anti-aircraft fire. The Beaufighters and their escort of Mustang Mk III fighters from the RAF's No. 65 Squadron were also intercepted by twelve German Focke-Wulf Fw 190 fighters of the Luftwaffe fighter wing Jagdgeschwader 5. In the resulting attack, the Allies damaged at least two of the German ships for the loss of seven Beaufighters shot down by flak guns. Another two Beaufighters and one Mustang were shot down by the Fw 190s
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Action Of 9 February 1945
The Action of 9 February 1945
Action of 9 February 1945
refers to the sinking of U-boat
U-boat
U-864 in the North Sea
North Sea
off the Norwegian island of Fedje during the Second World War by the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
submarine HMS Venturer. This action is the only incident of its kind where one submarine has sunk another submarine in combat while both were at periscope depth.[2]Contents1 Background 2 The Action 3 Aftermath 4 See also 5 ReferencesBackground[edit] U-864 was a Type IX U-boat, designed for ocean-going voyages far from home ports with limited re-supply. She was on a long-range, covert mission codenamed Operation Caesar
Operation Caesar
to deliver highly sensitive technology to Germany's wartime ally, the Empire of Japan. This included parts for jet engines and missile guidance systems, and 65 tonnes of mercury
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Battle Of Haglebu
Norwegian victoryGerman attack repelled Orderly Norwegian withdrawalBelligerents Norway
Norway
(Milorg) GermanyStrength100 men[1] 80-140 men[2]Casualties and losses7 dead 2 wounded 25-30 dead Unknown number woundedv t eNorwegian Campaigns (1941–45)Claymore Gauntlet Anklet Archery Fritham Musketoon Oslo raid Cartoon Checkmate Attacks on TirpitzSource Tungsten Mascot Goodwood Paravane Obviate CatechismZitronella Leader Finnmark Provident 28 January 1945 Black Friday 9 February 1945 Haglebu Bjørn West Judgement DoomsdayThe Battle of Haglebu
Battle of Haglebu
was a minor battle towards the end of World War II in Norway. A patrol consisting of German and Norwegian police troops had been tipped about weapon storages in Haglebu, and came up from Eggedal
Eggedal
on a search. On the southern shore of Haglebuvannet, the German force split so it could search on both sides of the lake
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Operation Judgement (1945)
Operation Judgement was an operation carried out at the end of World War II by the Home Fleet of the British Royal Navy in North Norway on 4 May 1945, when 44 aircraft of the Fleet Air Arm attacked a U-boat base 5 miles (8.0 km) south of the town and port of Harstad. The attack was directed at vessels in the natural harbour at Kilbotn. It lasted seven minutes and left two ships and a U-boat sunk. No Norwegians in the village of Kilbotn were killed or injured during or after the attack. Operation Judgement was the last air raid of World War II in Europe.Contents1 Background 2 The attack 3 Aftermath 4 ReferencesBackground[edit] From 1939 to 1945 the German war effort made extensive use of the U-boat as a strategic weapon. From bases in Northern Norway U-boats sailed against the Allied convoys making for Russian ports in the Arctic Ocean
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Operation Mascot
Operation Mascot
Operation Mascot
was an unsuccessful British carrier air raid conducted against the German battleship Tirpitz
German battleship Tirpitz
at her anchorage in Kaafjord, Norway, on 17 July 1944. The attack was one of a series of strikes against the battleship launched from aircraft carriers between April and August 1944, and was initiated after Allied intelligence determined that the damage inflicted during the Operation Tungsten raid on 3 April had been repaired. A force of 44 British dive bombers and 40 fighters took off from three aircraft carriers in the early hours of 17 July. German radar stations detected these aircraft while they were en route to Kaafjord, and Tirpitz was protected by a smoke screen by the time the strike force arrived. Few of the British airmen were able to spot the battleship, and their attacks did not inflict any significant damage
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Operation Doomsday
In Operation Doomsday, the British 1st Airborne Division acted as a police and military force during the Allied occupation of Norway in May 1945, immediately after the victory in Europe during the Second World War. The division maintained law and order until the arrival of the remainder of Force 134, the occupation force. During its time in Norway, the division was tasked with supervising the surrender of the German forces in Norway, as well as preventing the sabotage of vital military and civilian facilities. The German Instrument of Surrender was delivered on 8 May to General Franz Böhme, the commander of all German forces stationed in Norway, and the 1st Airborne Division landed near Oslo and Stavanger between 9 May and 11 May. The majority of the transport aircraft carrying the division landed safely, but three planes crashed with a number of fatalities. The division encountered little of the expected German resistance
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