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One-party State
A one-party state, single-party state, one-party system, single-party system is a type of state in which one political party has the right to form the government, usually based on the existing constitution. All other parties are either outlawed or allowed to take only a limited and controlled participation in elections
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Coalition
The term "coalition" is the denotation for a group formed when two or more persons, faction, states, political parties, militaries etc. agree to work together temporarily in a partnership to achieve a common goal
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Class Struggle
Class conflict, frequently referred to as class warfare or class struggle, is the tension or antagonism which exists in society due to competing socioeconomic interests and desires between people of different classes. The view that the class struggle provides the lever for radical social change for the majority is central to the work of communist Karl Marx
Karl Marx
and the anarchist Mikhail Bakunin. Class conflict
Class conflict
can take many different forms: direct violence, such as wars fought for resources and cheap labor; indirect violence, such as deaths from poverty, starvation, illness or unsafe working conditions; coercion, such as the threat of losing a job or the pulling of an important investment; or ideologically, such as with books and articles
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Confidence And Supply
In a parliamentary democracy based on the Westminster system, confidence and supply are required for a minority government to retain power in the lower house. A confidence-and-supply agreement is one whereby a party or independent members of parliament will support the government in motions of confidence and appropriation or budget (supply) votes, by either voting in favour or abstaining. However, parties and independent members normally retain the right to otherwise vote in favour of their own policies or on conscience on legislative bills.[1][2][3] A coalition government is a more formal arrangement than a confidence-and-supply agreement, in that members from junior parties (i.e
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Minority Government
A minority government, or minority cabinet or minority parliament, is a cabinet formed in a parliamentary system when a political party or coalition of parties does not have a majority of overall seats in the parliament. It is sworn into office, with or without the formal support of other parties, to enable a government to be formed. Under such a government, legislation can only be passed with the support of enough other members of the legislature to provide a majority, encouraging multi-partisanship
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Fundamentalism
Fundamentalism usually has a religious connotation that indicates unwavering attachment to a set of irreducible beliefs.[1] However, fundamentalism has come to be applied to a tendency among certain groups—mainly, though not exclusively, in religion—that is characterized by a markedly strict literalism as it is applied to certain specific scriptures, dogmas, or ideologies, and a strong sense of the importance of maintaining ingroup and outgroup distinctions,[2][3][4][5] leading to an emphasis on purity and the desire to return to a previous ideal from which advocates believe members have strayed
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Conservatism
Conservatism
Conservatism
is a political and social philosophy promoting traditional social institutions in the context of culture and civilization. The central tenets of conservatism include tradition, human imperfection, organic society, hierarchy and authority and property rights.[1] Conservatives seek to preserve a range of institutions such as monarchy, religion, parliamentary government and property rights with the aim of emphasizing social stability and continuity[2] while the more extreme elements called reactionaries oppose modernism and seek a return to "the way things were".[3][4] The first established use of the term in a political context originated in 1818 with François-René de Chateaubriand[5] during the period of Bourbon restoration
Bourbon restoration
that sought to roll back the policies of the French Revolution
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National Unity Government
A national unity government, government of national unity, or national union government is a broad coalition government consisting of all parties (or all major parties) in the legislature, usually formed during a time of war or other national emergency.Contents1 Afghanistan 2 Canada2.1 Newfoundland3 Croatia 4 Greece 5 Hungary 6 Israel 7 Italy 8 Kenya 9 Lebanon 10 Luxembourg 11 Nepal 12 Sri Lanka 13 United Kingdom13.1 Quasi-national governments14 United States 15 Zimbabwe 16 National parties 17 See also 18 ReferencesAfghanistan[edit] Following the disputed 2014 presidential elections, a National Unity Government (NUG) between both run-off candidates was formed.[1] Canada[edit] During World War I
World War I
the Conservative government of Sir Robert Borden invited the Liberal opposition to join the government as a means of dealing with the Conscription crisis of 1917
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Majority Government
A majority government is a government formed by a governing party that has an absolute majority of seats in the legislature or parliament in a parliamentary system. This is as opposed to a minority government, where the largest party in a legislature only has a plurality of seats. A majority government is usually assured of having its legislation passed and rarely, if ever, has to fear being defeated in parliament. In contrast, a minority government must constantly bargain for support from other parties in order to pass legislation and avoid being defeated on motions of no confidence. The term "majority government" may also be used for a stable coalition of two or more parties to form an absolute majority
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Hung Parliament
A hung parliament is a term used in legislatures under the Westminster system to describe a situation in which no particular political party or pre-existing coalition (also known as an alliance or bloc) has an absolute majority of legislators (commonly known as members or seats) in a parliament or other legislature. This situation is also known, albeit less commonly, as a balanced parliament,[1][2] or as a legislature under no overall control,[3][4][5] and can result in a minority government. The term is not relevant in multi-party systems where it is rare for a single party to hold a majority. In the Westminster System, in the circumstance of a hung parliament, no party or coalition has an automatic mandate to assume control of the executive – a status usually known in parliamentary systems as "forming (a) government"
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Soviet Society
The culture of the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
passed through several stages during the 69-year existence of the Soviet Union. It was contributed to by people of various nationalities from every single one of fifteen union republics, although a slight majority of them were Russians. The Soviet state supported cultural institutions, but also carried out strict censorship.Contents1 History1.1 The Lenin years 1.2 Stalin era 1.3 Late Soviet Union2 See also 3 References and further readingHistory[edit] The Lenin years[edit] The main feature of communist attitudes towards the arts and artists in the years 1918-1929 was relative freedom, with significant experimentation in several different styles in an effort to find a distinctive Soviet style of art. In many respects, the NEP period was a time of relative freedom and experimentation for the social and cultural life of the Soviet Union
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Opposition (politics)
The political party that has the majority is called ruling party and all other parties or their members are called the Opposition.Stand in Opposition (imprints in front of Old City
City
Hall, Boston)In politics, the opposition comprises one or more political parties or other organized groups that are opposed to the government (or, in American English, the administration), party or group in political control of a city, region, state or country. It is the party that goes against another party. The degree of opposition varies according to political conditions - for example, across authoritarian and liberal systems where opposition may be repressed or welcomed.[1] See also[edit]Her Majesty's loyal opposition Opposition (parliamentary) Political dissentReferences[edit]^ Blondel, J (1997). "Political opposition in the contemporary world". Government
Government
and opposition
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Radical Centrism
The terms radical centrism, radical center (or radical centre) and radical middle refer to a political ideology that arose in the Western nations in the late 20th century. At first it was defined in a variety of ways, but at the beginning of the 21st century a number of political science texts gave it a more developed cast.[1][2] The "radical" in the term refers to a willingness on the part of most radical centrists to call for fundamental reform of institutions.[3] The "centrism" refers to a belief that genuine solutions require realism and pragmatism, not just idealism and emotion.[4] Thus one radical centrist text defines radical centrism as "idealism without illusions",[5] a phrase originally from John F
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List Of Political Parties In The People's Republic Of China
Politics
Politics
(from Greek: πολιτικά, translit. Politiká, meaning "affairs of the cities") is the process of making decisions that apply to members of a group.[1] It refers to achieving and exercising positions of governance—organized control over a human community, particularly a state.[2] In modern nation states, people have formed political parties to represent their ideas. They agree to take the same position on many issues, and agree to support the same changes to law and the same leaders.[3] An election is usually a competition between different parties.[4] Some examples of political parties are the African National Congress (ANC) in South Africa, the Tories
Tories
in Great Britain
Great Britain
and the Indian National Congress. Politics
Politics
is a multifaceted word
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National Front (East Germany)
The National Front of the German Democratic Republic
German Democratic Republic
(German: Nationale Front der Deutschen Demokratischen Republik, NF), until 1973 the National Front of Democratic Germany German: Nationale Front des Demokratischen Deutschlands), was an alliance (Popular Front) of political parties and mass organisations in East Germany
East Germany
(also known as a Blockpartei)
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Democratic Front For The Reunification Of The Fatherland
The Democratic Front for the Reunification of the Fatherland
Democratic Front for the Reunification of the Fatherland
(DFRF; also known as the Fatherland Front), formed on 22 July 1946,[1] is a North Korean united front led by the Workers' Party of Korea
Workers' Party of Korea
(WPK)
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