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Once Upon A Time
"Once upon a time" is a stock phrase used to introduce a narrative of past events, typically in fairy tales and folk tales. It has been used in some form since at least 1380 (according to the Oxford English Dictionary) in storytelling in the English language
English language
and has opened many oral narratives since 1600. These stories often then end with "and they all lived happily ever after", or, originally, "happily until their deaths". The phrase is particularly common in fairy tales for younger children, where it is almost always the opening line of a tale
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Standard Hindi
Hindi
Hindi
(Devanagari: हिन्दी, IAST: Hindī), or Modern Standard Hindi
Standard Hindi
(Devanagari: मानक हिन्दी, IAST: Mānak Hindī) is a standardised and sanskritised register[5] of the Hindustani language. Modern Hindi
Hindi
and its literary tradition evolved towards the end of the 18th century.[6] Along with the English language, Hindi
Hindi
written in the Devanagari script is the official language of the Government of India.[7] On 14 September 1949, the Constituent Assembly of India
India
adopted Hindi written in Devanagari script
Devanagari script
as the official language of the Republic of India
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Dutch Language
 Aruba  Belgium  Curaçao  Netherlands  Sint Maarten  Suriname Benelux European Union South American Union CaricomRegulated by Nederlandse Taalunie (Dutch Language Union)Language codesISO 639-1 nlISO 639-2 dut (B) nld (T)ISO 639-3 nld Dutch/FlemishGlottolog mode1257[4]Linguasphere 52-ACB-aDutch-speaking world (included are areas of daughter-language Afrikaans)Distribution of the Dutch language
Dutch language
and its dialects in Western EuropeThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters
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Bengali Language
অবহট্টOld BengaliDialectssee Bengali dialectsWriting system Eastern Nagari script
Eastern Nagari script
(Bengali alphabet) Bengali BrailleSigned formsBengali signed forms[4]Official statusOfficial language in Bangladesh   India
India
(in West Bengal, Tripura
Tripura
& Southern Assam)Regulated by Bangla Academy Paschimbanga Bangla AkademiLanguage codesISO 639-1 bnISO 639-2 benISO 639-3 benGlottolog beng1280[5]Linguasphere 59-AAF-uBengali speaking region of South AsiaBengali speakers around the worldThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters. For an introductory guide on IPA symbols, see Help:IPA.This article contains Bengali text
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Breton Language
50-ABB-b (varieties: 50-ABB-ba to -be)Regional distribution of Breton speakers (2004)This article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters. For an introductory guide on IPA symbols, see Help:IPA.Breton (/ˈbrɛtən/; brezhoneg [bʁeˈzõːnɛk] ( listen)[5] or [brəhõˈnek] in Morbihan) is a Southwestern Brittonic Celtic language spoken in Brittany. Breton was brought from Great Britain
Great Britain
to Armorica
Armorica
by migrating Britons during the Early Middle Ages; it is thus an Insular Celtic language, and as such not closely related to the Continental Celtic Gaulish language which had been spoken in pre-Roman Gaul
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Bulgarian Language
 Moldova  Ukraine  Serbia  Albania  RomaniaRegulated by Institute for the Bulgarian language
Bulgarian language
at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (Институт за български език при Българската академия на науките (БАН))Language codesISO 639-1 bgISO 639-2 bulISO 639-3 bulGlottolog bulg1262[7]Linguasphere 53-AAA-hb < 53-AAA-hThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters
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Catalan Language
Catalan (/ˈkætəlæn, -ən, ˌkætəˈlæn/;[4] autonym: català [kətəˈla] or [kataˈla]) is a Western Romance
Western Romance
language derived from Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
and named after the medieval Principality of Catalonia, in northeastern modern Spain. It is the only official language of Andorra,[5] and a co-official language of the Spanish autonomous communities of Catalonia, the Balearic Islands
Balearic Islands
and Valencia (where the language is known as Valencian). It also has semi-official status in the Italian commune of Alghero.[6] These territories are often called Catalan Countries. Catalan evolved from Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
in the Middle Ages around the eastern Pyrenees
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Chinese Language
Legend:   Countries identified Chinese as a primary, administrative, or native language   Countries with more than 5,000,000 Chinese speakers   Countries with more than 1,000,000 Chinese speakers   Countries with more than 500,000 Chinese speakers   Countries with more than 100,000 Chinese speakers   Major Chinese-speaking settlementsThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters
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Traditional Chinese
Traditional Chinese characters
Chinese characters
(traditional Chinese: 正體字/繁體字; simplified Chinese: 正体字/繁体字; Pinyin: Zhèngtǐzì/Fántǐzì) are Chinese characters
Chinese characters
in any character set that does not contain newly created characters or character substitutions performed after 1946. They are most commonly the characters in the standardized character sets of Taiwan, of Hong Kong and Macau
Macau
or in the Kangxi Dictionary
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Simplified Chinese
Simplified Chinese characters
Chinese characters
(简化字; jiǎnhuàzì)[1] are standardized Chinese characters
Chinese characters
prescribed in the Table of General Standard Chinese
Standard Chinese
Characters for use in mainland China. Along with traditional Chinese characters, they are one of the two standard character sets of the contemporary Chinese written language. The government of the People's Republic of China
People's Republic of China
in mainland China has promoted them for use in printing since the 1950s and 1960s to encourage literacy.[2] They are officially used in the People's Republic of China
Republic of China
and Singapore. Traditional Chinese
Traditional Chinese
characters are currently used in Hong Kong, Macau, and the Republic of China
Republic of China
(Taiwan)
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Pinyin
Hanyu Pinyin
Hanyu Pinyin
Romanization
Romanization
(simplified Chinese: 汉语拼音; traditional Chinese: 漢語拼音), often abbreviated to pinyin, is the official romanization system for Standard Chinese
Standard Chinese
in mainland China
China
and to some extent in Taiwan. It is often used to teach Standard Mandarin Chinese, which is normally written using Chinese characters. The system includes four diacritics denoting tones. Pinyin
Pinyin
without tone marks is used to spell Chinese names and words in languages written with the Latin alphabet, and also in certain computer input methods to enter Chinese characters. The pinyin system was developed in the 1950s by many linguists, including Zhou Youguang,[1] based on earlier form romanizations of Chinese
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Croatian Language
Croatian /kroʊˈeɪʃən/ ( listen) (hrvatski [xř̩ʋaːtskiː]) is the standardized variety of the Serbo-Croatian language[6][7][8] used by Croats,[9] principally in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Serbian province of Vojvodina
Vojvodina
and other neighboring countries. It is the official and literary standard of Croatia
Croatia
and one of the official languages of the European Union. Croatian is also one of the official languages of Bosnia and Herzegovina, a recognized minority language in Serbia, and neighboring countries. Standard Croatian is based on the most widespread dialect of Serbo-Croatian, Shtokavian, more specifically on Eastern Herzegovinian, which is also the basis of Standard Serbian, Bosnian, and Montenegrin
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Czech Language
Czech (/tʃɛk/; čeština Czech pronunciation: [ˈtʃɛʃcɪna]), historically also Bohemian[6] (/boʊˈhiːmiən, bə-/;[7] lingua Bohemica in Latin), is a West Slavic language
West Slavic language
of the Czech–Slovak group.[6] Spoken by over 10 million people, it serves as the official language of the Czech Republic. Czech is closely related to Slovak, to the point of mutual intelligibility to a very high degree.[8] Like other Slavic languages, Czech is a fusional language with a rich system of morphology and relatively flexible word order. Its vocabulary has been extensively influenced by Latin[9] and German.[10] The Czech–Slovak group developed within West Slavic
West Slavic
in the high medieval period, and the standardization of Czech and Slovak within the Czech–Slovak dialect continuum emerged in the early modern period
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Esperanto
Esperanto
Esperanto
(/ˌɛspəˈræntoʊ/ or /-ˈrɑː-/;[4][5] Esperanto: Esperanto
Esperanto
[espeˈranto]  listen (help·info)) is a constructed international auxiliary language. With an estimated two million speakers worldwide,[1] it is the most widely spoken constructed language in the world.[6] The Polish-Jewish ophthalmologist L. L. Zamenhof
L. L. Zamenhof
published the first book detailing Esperanto, Unua Libro, in Warsaw
Warsaw
on July 26 [O.S. July 14] 1887
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Azerbaijani Language
 Azerbaijan  Russia DagestanRegulated by Azerbaijan
Azerbaijan
National Academy of SciencesLanguage codesISO 639-1 azISO 639-2 azeISO 639-3 aze – inclusive code Individual codes: azj – North Azerbaijani azb – South Azerbaijani slq – Salchuq qxq – QashqaiGlottolog azer1255  North Azeri–Salchuq[2] sout2696  South Azeri–Qashqa'i[3]Linguasphere part of 44-AAB-aLocation of Azerbaijani speakers in Transcaucasia   regions where Azerbaijani is the language of the majority   regions where Azerbaijani is the language of a significant minorityThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
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Estonian Language
Estonian (eesti keel [ˈeːsti ˈkeːl] ( listen)) is the official language of Estonia, spoken natively by about 1.1 million people: 922,000 people in Estonia
Estonia
and 160,000 outside Estonia.[3] It belongs to the Finnic branch of the Uralic language family.Contents1 Classification 2 History2.1 Estonian literature 2.2 State language3 Dialects 4 Writing system4.1 Alphabet 4.2 Orthography5 Phonology 6 Grammar 7 Vocabulary7.1 Ex nihilo
Ex nihilo
lexical enrichment8 Sample text 9 See also 10 References 11 Further reading 12 External linksClassification[edit] Estonian belongs to the Finnic branch of the Uralic languages, along with Finnish, Karelian, and other nearby languages. The Uralic languages do not belong to the Indo-European languages
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