HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Olivia De Havilland
Dame
Dame
Olivia Mary de Havilland DBE (/dəˈhævɪlənd/; born July 1, 1916) is a Japanese-born retired British-American actress, whose career spanned from 1935 to 1988.[1] She appeared in 49 feature films, and was one of the leading movie stars during the golden age of Classical Hollywood. She is best known for her early screen performances in The Adventures of Robin Hood
The Adventures of Robin Hood
(1938) and Gone with the Wind (1939), and her later award-winning performances in To Each His Own (1946), The Snake Pit
The Snake Pit
(1948), and The Heiress
The Heiress
(1949). Born in Tokyo
Tokyo
to British parents, de Havilland and her younger sister, actress Joan Fontaine, moved with their mother to California in 1919. They were brought up by their mother Lilian, a former stage actress who taught them drama, music, and elocution
[...More...]

"Olivia De Havilland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

George W. Bush
Governor of TexasGovernorship43rd President of the United StatesPresidencyTimelinePoliciesDomestic Economic ForeignBush Doctrine International tripsLegislation & Programs Pardons SpaceAppointmentsCabinet Judicial AppointmentsFirst termCampaign for the Presidency2000 General election Primaries Bush v. Gore Florida1st inaugurationSeptember 11 attacks War on TerrorismWar in Afghanistan Invasion of IraqEmail controversySecond termRe-election campaign2004 General election Primaries2nd inaugurationWar in Iraq State of the Union, 2006 2007 Iraq
Iraq
surgeDismissal of U.S
[...More...]

"George W. Bush" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Candida (play)
Candida, a comedy by playwright George Bernard Shaw, was written in 1894 and first published in 1898, as part of his Plays Pleasant. The central characters are clergyman James Morell, his wife Candida and a youthful poet, Eugene Marchbanks, who tries to win Candida's affections. The play questions Victorian notions of love and marriage, asking what a woman really desires from her husband. The cleric is a Christian
Christian
Socialist, allowing Shaw—himself a Fabian Socialist—to weave political issues, current at the time, into the story. Shaw attempted but failed to have a London
London
production of the play put on in the 1890s, but there were two small provincial productions. However, in late 1903 actor Arnold Daly
Arnold Daly
had such a great success with the play that Shaw would write by 1904 that New York was seeing "an outbreak of Candidamania"
[...More...]

"Candida (play)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Romantic Comedy Film
Romantic comedy
Romantic comedy
(also known as the portmanteaus romedy or romcom) is a genre with light-hearted, humorous plotlines, centered on romantic ideals such as that true love is able to surmount most obstacles.[1] One dictionary definition is "a funny movie, play, or television program about a love story that ends happily".[2] Another definition states that its "primary distinguishing feature is a love plot in which two sympathetic and well-matched lovers are united or reconciled".[3]
[...More...]

"Romantic Comedy Film" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Western (genre)
The Western is a genre of various arts which tell stories set primarily in the later half of the 19th century in the American Old West, often centering on the life of a nomadic cowboy or gunfighter[1] armed with a revolver and a rifle who rides a horse. Cowboys and gunslingers typically wear Stetson
Stetson
hats, bandannas, spurs, cowboy boots and buckskins. Other characters include Native Americans, bandits, lawmen, bounty hunters, outlaws, soldiers (especially mounted cavalry), settlers, both farmers and ranchers, and townsfolk. Westerns often stress the harshness of the wilderness and frequently set the action in an arid, desolate landscape of deserts and mountains
[...More...]

"Western (genre)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Historical Period Drama
The term historical period drama (also historical drama, period drama, costume drama, and period piece) refers to a work set in a past time period, usually used in the context of film and television. It is an informal crossover term that can apply to several genres and is often heard in the context of historical fiction and romances, adventure films and swashbucklers. A period piece may be set in a vague or general era such as the middle ages or a specific period such as the Roaring Twenties. A religious work can qualify as period drama but not as historical drama.Contents1 Historical accuracy 2 Examples 3 See also 4 Notes 5 External linksHistorical accuracy[edit] Some works attempt to accurately portray historical events or persons, to the degree that the available historical research will allow. These types of works are also known as docudrama, examples being Cinderella Man, Schindler’s List, and Lincoln
[...More...]

"Historical Period Drama" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Romance Film
Romance films or romance movies are romantic love stories recorded in visual media for broadcast in theaters and on TV that focus on passion, emotion, and the affectionate romantic involvement of the main characters and the journey that their genuinely strong, true and pure romantic love takes them through dating, courtship or marriage. Romance films make the romantic love story or the search for strong and pure love and romance the main plot focus. Occasionally, romance lovers face obstacles such as finances, physical illness, various forms of discrimination, psychological restraints or family that threaten to break their union of love
[...More...]

"Romance Film" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Broadway Theatre
Broadway theatre,[nb 1] commonly known as Broadway, refers to the theatrical performances presented in the 41 professional theatres with 500 or more seats located in the Theater District and Lincoln Center along Broadway, in Midtown Manhattan, New York City.[1] Along with London's West End theatre, Broadway theatre
Broadway theatre
is widely considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre in the English-speaking world. The Theater District is a popular tourist attraction in New York City. According to The Broadway League, for the 2016–2017 season (which ended May 21, 2017), total attendance was 13,270,343 and Broadway shows had US$1,449,399,149 in grosses, with attendance down 0.4%, grosses up 5.5%, and playing weeks down 4.1%.[2] The great majority of Broadway shows are musicals
[...More...]

"Broadway Theatre" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Romeo And Juliet
Romeo
Romeo
and Juliet
Juliet
is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare
early in his career about two young star-crossed lovers whose deaths ultimately reconcile their feuding families. It was among Shakespeare's most popular plays during his lifetime and along with Hamlet, is one of his most frequently performed plays. Today, the title characters are regarded as archetypal young lovers. Romeo
Romeo
and Juliet
Juliet
belongs to a tradition of tragic romances stretching back to antiquity. The plot is based on an Italian tale translated into verse as The Tragical History of Romeus and Juliet
The Tragical History of Romeus and Juliet
by Arthur Brooke in 1562 and retold in prose in Palace of Pleasure
Palace of Pleasure
by William Painter in 1567
[...More...]

"Romeo And Juliet" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Roots
In vascular plants, the root is the organ of a plant that typically lies below the surface of the soil. Roots can also be aerial or aerating, that is, growing up above the ground or especially above water. Furthermore, a stem normally occurring below ground is not exceptional either (see rhizome). Therefore, the root is best defined as the non-leaf, non-nodes bearing parts of the plant's body
[...More...]

"Roots" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ingenue (stock Character)
The ingénue /ˈɑːnʒeɪnuː/ is a stock character in literature, film, and a role type in the theatre; generally a girl or a young woman who is endearingly innocent and wholesome. Ingénue
Ingénue
may also refer to a new young actress or one typecast in such roles. The term comes from the feminine form of the French adjective ingénu meaning "ingenuous" or innocent, virtuous, and candid. The term may also imply a lack of sophistication and cunning. Typically, the ingénue is beautiful, kind, gentle, sweet, virginal, and often naïve, in mental or emotional danger, or even physical danger, usually a target of the Cad; whom she may have mistaken for the Hero. Due to lack of independence, the ingénue usually lives with her father, husband, or a father figure. The vamp (femme fatale) is often a foil for the ingénue (or the damsel in distress). The ingénue is often accompanied with a romantic side plot
[...More...]

"Ingenue (stock Character)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Anastasia
Anastasia
Anastasia
(from Greek Ἀναστασία) is a feminine given name and the female equivalent of the male name Anastasius. The name is of Greek origin, coming from the Greek word anastasis (ἀνάστασις), meaning "resurrection". It is a popular name in Eastern Europe, particularly in Russia, where it was the most used name for decades until 2008, when its place was taken by Sophia
[...More...]

"Anastasia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Primetime Emmy Award
The Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
is an American award bestowed by the Academy of Television
Television
Arts & Sciences (ATAS) in recognition of excellence in American primetime television programming. First given out in 1949, the award was originally referred to as simply the "Emmy Awards" until the first Daytime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
ceremony was held in 1974 and the word "prime time" was added to distinguish between the two. The Primetime Emmy Awards generally air in mid-September, on the Sunday before the official start of the fall television season. They are currently seen in rotation among the four major networks (ABC, CBS, Fox, and NBC)
[...More...]

"Primetime Emmy Award" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Academy Awards
MoonlightBest Picture The Shape of WaterThe Academy Awards, also known as the Oscars,[1] are a set of 24 awards for artistic and technical merit in the American film industry, given annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), to recognize excellence in cinematic achievements as assessed by the Academy's voting membership. The various category winners are awarded a copy of a golden statuette, officially called the "Academy Award of Merit", which has become commonly known by its nickname "Oscar". The sculpture was created by George Stanley.[2] The awards, first presented in 1929 at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel, are overseen by AMPAS.[3][4] The awards ceremony was first broadcast on radio in 1930 and televised for the first time in 1953. It is now seen live in more than 200 countries and can be streamed live online.[5] The Academy Awards ceremony is the oldest worldwide entertainment awards ceremony
[...More...]

"Academy Awards" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Golden Globe Award
Golden Globe Awards are accolades bestowed by the 93 members of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association
Hollywood Foreign Press Association
beginning in January 1944, recognizing excellence in film and television, both domestic and foreign. The annual ceremony at which the awards are presented is a major part of the film industry's awards season, which culminates each year in the Academy Awards.[1] The eligibility period for the Golden Globes corresponds to the calendar year (i.e. January 1 through December 31). The most recent ceremony, the 75th Golden Globe Awards, honoring the best in film and television in 2017, was held on January 7, 2018
[...More...]

"Golden Globe Award" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

New York Film Critics Circle
The New York Film Critics Circle (NYFCC) is an American film critic organization founded in 1935
[...More...]

"New York Film Critics Circle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.