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Okazaki, Aichi
Okazaki (岡崎市, Okazaki-shi) is a city located in Aichi Prefecture, Japan. In 2010, the city had an estimated population of 372,357 and a population density of 991.88 persons per km2. The total area was 387.20 km2 (149.50 sq mi).Contents1 Geography1.1 Surrounding municipalities2 History 3 Demographics3.1 Language4 Transportation4.1 Railway 4.2 Expressways 4.3 Japan
Japan
National Route5 Education5.1 Universities and colleges 5.2 Primary and secondary schools6 Local attractions6.1 Okazaki Castle 6.2 Fireworks 6.3 Hatchō miso 6.4 Takisan7 Twin towns/sister cities 8 Noted people from Okazaki 9 References 10 External linksGeography[edit] Okazaki is in the coastal plains of southeastern Aichi Prefecture. The ground rises to undulating hills in the former Nukata area to the northeast
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Typhoon Vera
Typhoon Vera, also known as the Isewan Typhoon (伊勢湾台風, Ise-wan Taifū), was an exceptionally intense tropical cyclone that struck Japan in September 1959, becoming the strongest and deadliest typhoon on record to make landfall on the country. The storm's intensity resulted in damage of unparalleled severity and extent, and was a major setback to the Japanese economy, which was still recovering from World War II. In the aftermath of Vera, Japan's disaster management and relief systems were significantly reformed, and the typhoon's effects would set a benchmark for future storms striking the country. Vera developed on September 20 between Guam
Guam
and Chuuk State, and initially tracked westward before taking a more northerly course, reaching tropical storm strength the following day
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Daimyō
The daimyō (大名, IPA: [daimʲoː] ( listen)) were powerful Japanese feudal lords[1] who, until their decline in the early Meiji period, ruled most of Japan from their vast, hereditary land holdings. In the term, dai (大) means "large", and myō stands for myōden (名田), meaning private land.[2] Subordinate only to the shōgun, daimyōs were the most powerful feudal rulers from the 10th century to the middle 19th century in Japan. From the Shugo of the Muromachi period
Muromachi period
through the Sengoku to the daimyōs of the Edo
Edo
period, the rank had a long and varied history
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Kofun Period
The Kofun
Kofun
period (古墳時代, Kofun
Kofun
jidai) is an era in the history of Japan
Japan
from around 250 to 538 AD. It follows the Yayoi
Yayoi
period. The word kofun is Japanese for the type of burial mounds dating from this era. The Kofun
Kofun
and the subsequent Asuka periods are sometimes referred to collectively as the Yamato period
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Kofun
Kofun
Kofun
(古墳, from Sino-Japanese "ancient grave") are megalithic tombs or tumuli in Japan, constructed between the early 3rd century and the early 7th century AD. The term Kofun
Kofun
is the origin of the name of the Kofun
Kofun
period, which indicates the middle 3rd century to early-middle 6th century. Many Kofun
Kofun
have distinctive keyhole-shaped mounds (zenpō-kōen fun (前方後円墳)), which are unique to ancient Japan
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Sengoku Period
The Sengoku period
Sengoku period
(戦国時代, Sengoku Jidai, "Age of Warring States"; c. 1467 – c. 1603) is a period in Japanese history marked by social upheaval, political intrigue and near-constant military conflict
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Matsudaira Clan
The Matsudaira clan
Matsudaira clan
(松平氏, Matsudaira-shi) was a Japanese samurai clan that claimed descent from the Minamoto clan. It originated in and took its name from Matsudaira village, in Mikawa Province
Mikawa Province
(modern-day Aichi Prefecture). Over the course of its history, the clan produced many branches, most of which are also in Mikawa Province. In the 16th century, the main Matsudaira line experienced a meteoric rise to success during the direction of Matsudaira Motoyasu, who changed his name to Tokugawa Ieyasu
Tokugawa Ieyasu
and became the first Tokugawa shogun. Ieyasu's line formed what became the Tokugawa clan; however, the branches retained the Matsudaira surname. Other branches were formed in the decades after Ieyasu, which bore the Matsudaira surname
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Edo Period
The Edo
Edo
period (江戸時代, Edo
Edo
jidai) or Tokugawa period (徳川時代) is the period between 1603 and 1868 in the history of Japan, when Japanese society was under the rule of the Tokugawa shogunate and the country's 300 regional daimyō. The period was characterized by economic growth, strict social order, isolationist foreign policies, a stable population, "no more wars", and popular enjoyment of arts and culture. The shogunate was officially established in Edo
Edo
on March 24, 1603, by Tokugawa Ieyasu
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Han (administrative Division)
The han (藩, han) or domain is the Japanese historical term for the estate of a warrior after the 12th century or of a daimyō in the Edo period (1603–1868) and early Meiji period
Meiji period
(1868–1912).[1]Contents1 History 2 Edo period 3 Meiji period 4 See also 5 Notes 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] In the Sengoku period
Sengoku period
(1467 – 1603), Toyotomi Hideyoshi
Toyotomi Hideyoshi
caused a transformation of the han system. The feudal system based on land became an abstraction based on periodic cadastral surveys and projected agricultural yields.[2] In Japan, a feudal domain was defined in terms of projected annual income. This was different from the feudalism of the West
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Hatago
Hatago (旅籠) were Edo period lodgings for travelers at shukuba (post stations) along the national highways, including the Edo Five Routes and the subroutes. In addition to a place to rest, hatago also offered meals and other foods to the travelers. They were also called hatagoya (旅籠屋).Contents1 Name Origin 2 Preserved Hatago2.1 Lodgings 2.2 Museums3 See also 4 ReferencesName Origin[edit] Hatago means "traveling basket." The word itself originally derived from baskets that contained food for horses and were carried by travelers. From there, it became a tool with which travelers were carry their own food and goods
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Jōmon Period
The Jōmon period
Jōmon period
(縄文時代, Jōmon jidai) is the time in Japanese prehistory, traditionally dated between c. 14,000–300 BCE,[1][2] recently refined to about 1000 BCE,[1][3][4] during which Japan
Japan
was inhabited by a hunter-gatherer culture, which reached a considerable degree of sedentism and cultural complexity
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Tōkaidō (road)
The Tōkaidō road (東海道) was the most important of the Five Routes of the Edo period
Edo period
in Japan, connecting Kyoto
Kyoto
to Edo
Edo
(modern-day Tokyo). Unlike the inland and less heavily travelled Nakasendō, the Tōkaidō travelled along the sea coast of eastern Honshū, hence the route's name.[2]Contents1 Travelling the Tōkaidō 2 The Tōkaidō in art and literature 3 Ōsaka Kaidō 4 Modern-day Tōkaidō 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksTravelling the Tōkaidō[edit] The standard method of travel was by foot, as wheeled carts were almost nonexistent and heavy cargo was usually sent by boat. Members of the higher class, however, travelled by kago. Women were forbidden to travel alone and had to be accompanied by men
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Edo
Edo
Edo
(江戸, "bay-entrance" or "estuary"), also romanized as Jedo, Yedo or Yeddo, is the former name of Tokyo.[2] It was the seat of power for the Tokugawa shogunate, which ruled Japan
Japan
from 1603 to 1868. During this period, it grew to become one of the largest cities in the world and home to an urban culture centered on the notion of a "floating world".[1]Contents1 History1.1 Magistrate2 Government and administration 3 Geography 4 Gallery 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External links8.1 HistoricHistory[edit] Main article: Edo
Edo
period From the establishment of the Tokugawa bakufu headquarters at Edo, the town became the de facto capital and center of political power, although Kyoto
Kyoto
remained the formal capital of the country
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Meiji Restoration
The Meiji Restoration
Meiji Restoration
(明治維新, Meiji Ishin), also known as the Meiji Ishin, Renovation, Revolution, Reform, or Renewal, was an event that restored practical imperial rule to the Empire of Japan
Empire of Japan
in 1868 under Emperor Meiji. Although there were ruling Emperors before the Meiji Restoration, the events restored practical abilities and consolidated the political system under the Emperor of Japan.[2] The goals of the restored government were expressed by the new Emperor in the Charter Oath
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1944 Tōnankai Earthquake
The 1944 Tōnankai earthquake
1944 Tōnankai earthquake
occurred at 13:35 local time (04:35 UTC) on 7 December. It had an estimated magnitude of 8.1 on the moment magnitude scale (making it the strongest known earthquake of 1944) and a maximum felt intensity of greater than 5 shindo (about VIII (Severe) on the Mercalli intensity scale). It triggered a large tsunami that caused serious damage along the coast of Wakayama Prefecture
Wakayama Prefecture
and the Tōkai region. Together the earthquake and tsunami caused 1,223 casualties.Contents1 Tectonic setting 2 Damage 3 Characteristics3.1 Earthquake 3.2 Tsunami4 Future seismic hazard 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksTectonic setting[edit] The southern coast of Honshū runs parallel to the Nankai Trough, which marks the subduction of the Philippine Sea Plate
Philippine Sea Plate
beneath the Eurasian Plate
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1945 Mikawa Earthquake
The 1945 Mikawa earthquake
1945 Mikawa earthquake
(三河地震, Mikawa jishin) occurred off Aichi prefecture, Japan
Japan
at 03:38 AM on January 13. As it occurred during World War II, information about the disaster was censored,[1] and efforts at keeping the disaster secret hampered relief efforts and contributed to a high death toll.Contents1 Earthquake 2 Damage 3 Previous events 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksEarthquake[edit] The Mikawa earthquake's epicenter was offshore in Mikawa Bay
Mikawa Bay
at a depth of eleven kilometers
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