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Oil Field
An "oil field" or "oilfield" is a region with an abundance of oil wells extracting petroleum (crude oil) from below ground. Because the oil reservoirs typically extend over a large area, possibly several hundred kilometres across, full exploitation entails multiple wells scattered across the area. In addition, there may be exploratory wells probing the edges, pipelines to transport the oil elsewhere, and support facilities. Because an oil field may be remote from civilization, establishing a field is often an extremely complicated exercise in logistics. This goes beyond requirements for drilling, to include associated infrastructure. For instance, workers require housing to allow them to work onsite for months or years. In turn, housing and equipment require electricity and water. In cold regions, pipelines may need to be heated
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Natural Gas Field
Natural gas
Natural gas
originates by the same geological thermal cracking process that converts kerogen to petroleum. As a consequence, oil and natural gas are often found together. In common usage, deposits rich in oil are known as oil fields, and deposits rich in natural gas are called natural gas fields. In general, organic sediments buried in depths of 1,000 m to 6,000 m (at temperatures of 60 °C to 150 °C) generate oil, while sediments buried deeper and at higher temperatures generate natural gas. The deeper the source, the "drier" the gas (that is, the smaller the proportion of condensates in the gas). Because both oil and natural gas are lighter than water, they tend to rise from their sources until they either seep to the surface or are trapped by a non-permeable stratigraphic trap
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Petroleum Play
In geology, a petroleum play, or simply a play, is a group of oil fields or prospects in the same region that are controlled by the same set of geological circumstances.[1] The term is widely and heavily used in the entire realm of exploitation of hydrocarbon-based resources. The play cycle normally exhibits the following steps:initial observations of a possible oil reserve testing and adjustments to initial estimates of extraction high success in locating and extracting oil from a reserve lower success as the reserve is depleted continued decrease in further exploration of the regionA particular stratigraphic or structural geologic setting is also often known as a play. For example, in a relatively unexplored area (such as the Falkland Islands) one might speak of the " Paleozoic
Paleozoic
play" to refer to the potential oil reserves that might be found within Paleozoic
Paleozoic
strata
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Oil Reserves
Oil reserves
Oil reserves
denote the amount of crude oil that can be technically recovered at a cost that is financially feasible at the present price of oil.[1] Hence reserves will change with the price, unlike oil resources, which include all oil that can be technically recovered at any price. Reserves may be for a well, for a reservoir, for a field, for a nation, or for the world. Different classifications of reserves are related to their degree of certainty. The total estimated amount of oil in an oil reservoir, including both producible and non-producible oil, is called oil in place. However, because of reservoir characteristics and limitations in petroleum extraction technologies, only a fraction of this oil can be brought to the surface, and it is only this producible fraction that is considered to be reserves
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Barrel (unit)
A barrel is one of several units of volume applied in various contexts; there are dry barrels, fluid barrels (such as the UK beer barrel and US beer barrel), oil barrels and so on. For historical reasons the volumes of some barrel units are roughly double the volumes of others; volumes in common usage range from about 100 to 200 litres (22 to 44 imp gal; 26 to 53 US gal). In many connections the term "drum" is used almost interchangeably with "barrel". Since medieval times the term barrel as a unit of measure has had various meanings throughout Europe, ranging from about 100 litres to 1000 litres. The name was derived in medieval times from the French baril, of unknown origin, but still in use, both in French and as derivations in many other languages such as Italian, Polish and Spanish. In most countries such usage is obsolescent, increasingly superseded by SI units
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1000000000 (number)
1,000,000,000
1,000,000,000
(one billion, short scale; one thousand million or milliard, yard,[1] long scale) is the natural number following 999,999,999 and preceding 1,000,000,001. One billion can also be written as b or bn.[2][3] In scientific notation, it is written as 1 × 109. The metric prefix giga indicates 1,000,000,000
1,000,000,000
times the base unit. Its symbol is G. One billion years may be called eon/aeon in astronomy or geology. Previously in British English
British English
(but not in American English), the word "billion" referred exclusively to a million millions (1,000,000,000,000). However, this is no longer as common as earlier, and the word has been used to mean one thousand million (1,000,000,000) for some time.[4] The alternative term "one thousand million" is mainly used in the U.K., or countries such as Spain that uses "one thousand million" as one million million constitutes a billion
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Kuwait
Coordinates: 29°30′N 45°45′E / 29.500°N 45.750°E / 29.500; 45.750State of Kuwait دولة الكويت (Arabic) Dawlat al-KuwaitFlagEmblemAnthem: "Al-Nasheed Al-Watani" "National Anthem"Location of  Kuwait  (green)Capital and largest city Kuwait
Kuwait
City 29°22′N 47°58′E / 29.367°N 47.967°E / 29.367; 47.967Official languages ArabicEthnic groups60% Arab
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Subsea
Subsea is fully submerged ocean equipment, operations or applications, especially when some distance offshore, in deep ocean waters, or on the seabed
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Saudi Arabia
Saudi Arabia[c] (/ˌsɔːdi əˈreɪbiə/ ( listen), /ˌsaʊ-/ ( listen)), officially the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA),[d] is a sovereign Arab
Arab
state in Western Asia
Western Asia
constituting the bulk of the Arabian Peninsula. With a land area of approximately 2,150,000 km2 (830,000 sq mi), Saudi Arabia
Arabia
is geographically the fifth-largest state in Asia
Asia
and second-largest state in the Arab
Arab
world after Algeria
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Underground Hydrogen Storage
Underground hydrogen storage is the practice of hydrogen storage in underground caverns,[1][2] salt domes and depleted oil/gas fields.[3][4] Large quantities of gaseous hydrogen have been stored in underground caverns by ICI for many years without any difficulties.[5] The storage of large quantities of hydrogen underground in solution-mined salt domes,[6] aquifers[7] or excavated rock caverns or mines can function as grid energy storage[8] which is essential for the hydrogen economy.[9] By using a turboexpander the electricity needs for compressed storage on 200 bar amounts to 2.1% of the energy content.[10]Contents1 Chevron Phillips Clemens Terminal 2 Development 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksChevron Phillips Clemens Terminal[edit] The Chevron Phillips Clemens Terminal in Texas has stored hydrogen since the 1980s in a solution-mined salt cavern. The cavern roof is about 2,800 feet (850 m) underground
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Infrastructure
Infrastructure
Infrastructure
is the fundamental facilities and systems serving a country, city, or other area,[1] including the services and facilities necessary for its economy to function.[2] It typically characterises technical structures such as roads, bridges, tunnels, water supply, sewers, electrical grids, telecommunications (including Internet connectivity and broadband speeds), and so forth, and can be defined as "the physical components of interrelated systems providing commodities and services essential to enable, sustain, or enhance societal living conditions."[3] The word infrastructure has been used in English since 1887 and in French since 1875, originally meaning "The installations that form the basis for any operation or system".[4][5] The word was imported from French, where it means subgrade, the native material underneath a constructed pavement or railway
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OAPEC
The Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries (OAPEC) is a multi-governmental organization headquartered in Kuwait which coordinates energy policies among oil-producing Arab nations
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Oilfield Terminology
Oilfield terminology refers to the jargon used by those working in fields within and related to the upstream segment of the petroleum industry. It includes words and phrases describing professions, equipment, and procedures specific to the industry. It may also include slang terms used by oilfield workers to describe the same.Contents1 Examples 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksExamples[edit]This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. (June 2010)Bell nipple: An enlarged pipe at the top of a casing string that serves as a funnel to guide drilling tools into the top of the well. Big bear: A big bear is a hitch (see hitch) that lasts a minimum of 50 straight days. Blowout: A sudden, uncontrolled release of underground pressure from the well. Chainhand (also motorman): An experienced laborer capable of maintaining most parts of the rig. The chainhand is in charge of throwing the chain to make up or break down pipe stands during tripping pipe
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The Prize
The Prize may refer to: The Prize (novel), a 1962 novel by Irving Wallace The Prize (1963 film), a 1963 film based on the novel The Prize (1950 film), a 1950 French film The Prize (2011 film), a 2011 Mexican filmThe Prize: The Epic Quest for Oil, Money, and Power, a 1991 book by Daniel Yer
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Hill International
Hill International (NYSE: HIL) is an American construction consulting firm
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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