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Oenochoe
An oenochoe, also spelled oinochoe (Ancient Greek: οἰνοχόη; from Ancient Greek: οἶνος oînos, "wine" and Ancient Greek: wikt:χέω khéō, "I pour"; plural oenochoai or oinochoai), is a wine jug and a key form of ancient Greek pottery. There are many different forms of oenochoe; Sir John Beazley
John Beazley
distinguished ten types. The earliest is the olpe (ὀλπή, olpḗ), with no distinct shoulder and usually a handle rising above the lip. The "type 8 oenochoe" is what one would call a mug, with no single pouring point and a slightly curved profile. The chous (χοῦς; pl. choes) was a squat rounded form, with trefoil mouth. Small examples with scenes of children, as in the example illustrated, were placed in the graves of children.[1] Oenochoai may be decorated or undecorated.[2] Oenochoai typically have only one handle at the back and may include a trefoil mouth and pouring spout
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Trefoil
Trefoil
Trefoil
(from Latin trifolium, "three-leaved plant") is a graphic form composed of the outline of three overlapping rings used in architecture and Christian symbolism. The term is also applied to other symbols of three-fold shape.Contents1 Architecture1.1 Ornamentation 1.2 Architectural layout2 Heraldry 3 Symbols 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksArchitecture[edit] Ornamentation[edit] Trefoil
Trefoil
is a term in Gothic architecture
Gothic architecture
given to the ornamental foliation or cusping introduced in the heads of window-lights, tracery, and panellings, in which the center takes the form of a three-lobed leaf (formed from three partially overlapping circles). One of the earliest examples is in the plate tracery at Winchester (1222–1235)
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Corinth
Corinth
Corinth
(/ˈkɒrɪnθ/; Greek: Κόρινθος, Kórinthos, pronounced [ˈkorinθos] ( listen)) is an ancient city and former municipality in Corinthia, Peloponnese, which is located in south-central Greece
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Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum
Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum ("corpus of ancient vases"; abbreviated CVA) is an international research project for ceramic documentation of the classical area. Overview[edit] CVA is the first and oldest research project of the Union Académique Internationale. The first project meeting was organized by Edmond Pottier in Paris
Paris
in 1919. The final decision was to publish a comprehensive catalogue of painted ancient Greek vases. He was also the publisher of the first fascicle for the Louvre
Louvre
in 1922. At that time six countries were part of the project. Today the project covers a compendium of more than 100,000 vases located in collections of 26 participating countries
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Wild-goat Style
The Wild Goat Style
Wild Goat Style
(variously capitalized and hyphenated) is a modern term describing vase painting produced in the east of Greece, namely the southern and eastern Ionian islands, between c. 650 to 550 BCE. Examples have been found notably at the sites in Chios, at Miletus
Miletus
and in Rhodes. The style owes its name to the predominant motif found on such vases: friezes of goats. The style developed the technique introduced during the Orientalizing Period
Orientalizing Period
of rendering the heads of figures in outline by applying it to the whole of a figure
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Apulia
Coordinates: 41°0′31″N 16°30′46″E / 41.00861°N 16.51278°E / 41.00861; 16.51278Apulia PugliaRegion of ItalyFlagCoat of armsCountry ItalyCapital BariGovernment • President Michele Emiliano (PD)Area • Total 19,358 km2 (7,474 sq mi)Population (31-12-2016) • Total 4,063,888 • Density 210/km2 (540/sq mi)Demonym(s) English: Apulian(s), Puglian(s) Italian: Pugliese, pl
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Pelike
A pelike (Ancient Greek: πελίκη) is a one-piece ceramic container similar to an amphora. It has two open handles that are vertical on their lateral aspects and even at the side with the edge of the belly, a narrow neck, a flanged mouth, and a sagging, almost spherical belly. Unlike the often-pointed bottom of many amphorae, the pelike's bottom is always flanged so it will stand on its own. Pelikes are often intricately painted, usually depicting a scene involving people
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Oinochoe By The Shuvalov Painter (Berlin F2414)
The Oinochoe by the Shuvalov Painter in the Antikensammlung at Berlin (inventory number F 2414) is one of the most famous erotic depictions from ancient Greek vase painting.Contents1 Description 2 References 3 Bibliography 4 See also 5 External linksDescription[edit]Complete view of the oinochoe in the current exhibition at the Altes Museum.The rather small oinochoe was found in Locri in southern Italy. The clay jug is covered with a highly glossy black clay slip almost in its entirety, thus rendering the single small painted red-figure scene particularly striking. It is positioned on the upper part of the vessel's body, directly opposite the handle. The image depicts a young man and a girl or woman immediately before sexual intercourse. The youth of the man is clearly indicated by his long curls hanging by his temple and neck. He is seated, tightly squeezed into a leather chair. Additionally, his hands are holding on to the seat
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Archaic Greece
Archaic Greece
Greece
was the period in Greek history lasting from the eighth century BC to the second Persian invasion of Greece
Greece
in 480 BC,[1] following the Greek Dark Ages
Greek Dark Ages
and succeeded by the Classical period. The period began with a massive increase in the Greek population[2] and a series of significant changes which rendered the Greek world at the end of the eighth century as entirely unrecognisable as compared to its beginning.[3] According to Anthony Snodgrass, the Archaic period in ancient Greece
Greece
was bounded by two revolutions in the Greek world
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Bronze
Bronze
Bronze
is an alloy consisting primarily of copper, commonly with about 12% tin and often with the addition of other metals (such as aluminium, manganese, nickel or zinc) and sometimes non-metals or metalloids such as arsenic, phosphorus or silicon. These additions produce a range of alloys that may be harder than copper alone, or have other useful properties, such as stiffness, ductility, or machinability. The archeological period where bronze was the hardest metal in widespread use is known as the Bronze
Bronze
Age. The beginning of the Bronze Age in Western Eurasia
Eurasia
and South Asia
Asia
is conventionally dated to the mid-4th millennium BC, and to the early 2nd millennium BC in China;[1] everywhere it gradually spread across regions
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Relief
Relief
Relief
is a sculptural technique where the sculpted elements remain attached to a solid background of the same material. The term relief is from the Latin verb relevo, to raise. To create a sculpture in relief is to give the impression that the sculpted material has been raised above the background plane.[1] What is actually performed when a relief is cut in from a flat surface of stone (relief sculpture) or wood (relief carving) is a lowering of the field, leaving the unsculpted parts seemingly raised. The technique involves considerable chiselling away of the background, which is a time-consuming exercise. On the other hand, a relief saves forming the rear of a subject, and is less fragile and more securely fixed than a sculpture in the round, especially one of a standing figure where the ankles are a potential weak point, especially in stone
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Terracotta
Terracotta, terra cotta or terra-cotta (pronounced [ˌtɛrraˈkɔtta]; Italian: "baked earth",[2] from the Latin terra cocta),[3] a type of earthenware, is a clay-based unglazed or glazed ceramic,[4] where the fired body is porous. Terracotta
Terracotta
is the term normally used for sculpture made in earthenware, and also for various utilitarian uses including vessels (notably flower pots), water and waste water pipes, roofing tiles, bricks, and surface embellishment in building construction.[5] The term is also used to refer to the natural, brownish orange color, of most terracotta, which varies considerably. This article covers the senses of terracotta as a medium in sculpture, as in the Terracotta Army
Terracotta Army
and Greek terracotta figurines, and architectural decoration. Asian and European sculpture in porcelain is not covered
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John Beazley
Sir
Sir
John Davidson Beazley, CH, FBA (/ˈbiːzli/; 13 September 1885 – 6 May 1970) was a British classical archaeologist and art historian, known for his classification of Attic vases by artistic style. He was Professor of Classical Archaeology
Archaeology
and Art at the University of Oxford from 1925 to 1956.[1]Contents1 Early life 2 Academic career 3 Later life 4 Honours 5 Personal life 6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit] Beazley was born in Glasgow, Scotland
Scotland
on 13 September 1885,[2] to Mark John Murray Beazley (died 1940) and Mary Catherine Beazley née Davidson (died 1918).[3] He was educated at King Edward VI School, Southampton and Christ's Hospital, Sussex.[2] He then attended Balliol College, Oxford
Oxford
where he read Literae Humaniores. He received firsts in both the Honour Moderations
Honour Moderations
and the Final Honour School
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Olla (Roman Pot)
In ancient Roman culture, the olla (archaic Latin: aula or aulla; Greek: χύτρα, chytra)[1][2][3] is a squat, rounded pot or jar. An olla would be used primarily to cook or store food, hence the word “olla" is still used in some Romance languages
Romance languages
for either a cooking pot or a dish in the sense of cuisine
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Jug
A jug is a type of container commonly used to hold liquid. It has an opening, often narrow, from which to pour or drink, and often has a handle. Most jugs throughout history have been made of ceramic, glass or plastic. Some Native American and other tribes created liquid holding vessels by making woven baskets lined with an asphaltum sealer.[1] In American English
American English
usage, a jug is a large container with a narrow mouth and handle for liquids, and may be used to describe thin plastic sealed shop packaging for milk and other liquids. In all other English speaking countries a jug is any container with a handle and a mouth and spout for liquid, and not used for retail packaging
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