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October Revolution
Bolshevik victoryEnd of Russian Provisional Government, Russian Republic
Russian Republic
and dual power Creation of Soviet Russia The Second All-Russian Congress of Soviets
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Vaga River Front
The Vaga River
Vaga River
front (Vaga front) was a front of the engagament of the Red Army
Red Army
and the Allied forces during the Allied intervention in the Russian Civil War. Established along the Vaga River, a tributary of Northern Dvina, it was the southernmost line of advance of the Allied in the North Russia Campaign. Initially its purpose was to outflank the retreating Red Army, but when the tide turned it was vital to secure the Allied right flank on the Northern Dvina
Northern Dvina
front.[1] References[edit]^ , John W. Long, " Vaga River
Vaga River
Front, Northern Russia (1918-1919)", in: Beede, 1994Beede, Benjamin R. (1994). The War of 1898, and U.S. Interventions, 1898-1934: An Encyclopedia
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Battle Of Bolshie Ozerki
The Battle of Bolshie Ozerki
Battle of Bolshie Ozerki
was a major engagement fought during the Allied intervention in the Russian Civil War. Beginning on March 31, 1919, a force of British, American, Polish, and White Russian troops engaged several Red Army
Red Army
partisan regiments at the village of Bolshie Ozerki. Although the initial Allied attacks were repelled, the outnumbered Allies managed to repel the Soviet flanking attempts that followed and the Red Army
Red Army
was later ordered to withdraw
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Old Style
Old Style (O.S.) and New Style (N.S.) are terms sometimes used with dates to indicate that the calendar convention used at the time described is different from that in use at the time the document was being written. There were two calendar changes in Great Britain and its colonies, which may sometimes complicate matters: the first change was to change the start of the year from Lady Day
Lady Day
(25 March) to 1 January; the second was to discard the Julian calendar
Julian calendar
in favour of the Gregorian calendar.[2][3][4] Closely related is the custom of dual dating, where writers gave two consecutive years to reflect differences in the starting date of the year, or to include both the Julian and Gregorian dates. Beginning in 1582, the Gregorian calendar
Gregorian calendar
replaced the Julian in Roman Catholic countries
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Red Army Invasion Of Azerbaijan
The Red Army
Red Army
invasion of Azerbaijan, also known as the Sovietization or Soviet invasion of Azerbaijan, was a military campaign carried out by the 11th Army of Soviet Russia
Russia
in April 1920
1920
to install a new Soviet government in the Azerbaijan
Azerbaijan
Democratic Republic. [1][2][3] The invasion coincided with the anti-government insurrection staged by the local Azerbaijani Bolsheviks
Bolsheviks
in the capital, Baku. The invasion led to the dissolution of the Azerbaijan Democratic Republic
Azerbaijan Democratic Republic
and the establishment of the Azerbaijan
Azerbaijan
Soviet Socialist Republic
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Polish–Ukrainian War
PolandRegional support: Romania (in Bukovina
Bukovina
and Pokuttia)  Hungary  CzechoslovakiaStrategic support:  France Ukraine WUPR (before 1919) Hutsul Republic (in Maramureș) Komancza Republic (in Lemkivshchyna
Lemkivshchyna

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Polish–Soviet War
Polish victoryPeace of RigaTerritorial changes Poland
Poland
re-takes control of present-day western Ukraine
Ukraine
and we
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Heimosodat
The term in Finnish historiography heimosodat (German: Kriege verwandter Völker[1]) has been translated literally into English as "Kindred Nations Wars", "Wars for kindred peoples" or "Kinship Wars," specifically Finnic kinship. It is sometimes erroneously translated as "Tribal Wars".[citation needed] It refers to conflicts in territories inhabited by other Baltic Finnic peoples, often in Russia
Russia
or in borders of Russia. Finnish volunteers took part in these conflicts either to assert Finnish control over the areas inhabited by related Finnic peoples or to help them to gain their independence. Many of the volunteer soldiers were inspired by the idea of Greater Finland. Some of the conflicts were incursions from Finland
Finland
and some were local uprisings, where volunteers wanted either to help the people in their fight for independence or to annex the areas to Finland
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Estonian War Of Independence
Independence of Estonia Vidzeme
Vidzeme
gained by the Republic of LatviaBelligerents Estonia  Latvia  United Kingdom White Movement Finnish, Danish, and Swedish volunteers Soviet Russia Estonian Workers' Commune Baltische LandeswehrCommanders and leaders Johan Laidoner Jukums Vācietis Rüdiger von der GoltzStrength7 January 1919: 4,450[1]Including2,000 Finnish volunteers + respective number of Finnish officers,[2] Baltic Battalion Bibikov squadron, 25 assault guns, 128 machine guns, 4 armoured trains 6th Light Cruiser Squadron of the Royal Navy[1]May 1919: 86,000Including Nor
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Latvian War Of Independence
Latvian Army merged from the:Latvian Independent Brigade[nb 1] North Latvian Brigade[nb 2] in July 1919 Estonia Lieven detachment[nb 3]  Poland  Lithuania Supported by the Allied Powers VI Reserve Corps:[1] Baltische Landeswehr Freikorpsmerged into the West Russian Volunteer Army
West Russian Volunteer Army
in September 1919  Russian SFSR  Latvian SSRCommanders and leaders Jānis Balodis Ernst Põdder Edward Rydz-Śmigły Rüdiger von der Goltz Alfred Fletcher Pavel Bermondt-Avalov Jukums Vācietis Dmitry Nadyozhny Pēteris Slavens<
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Lithuanian Wars Of Independence
The Lithuanian Wars of Independence, also known as the Freedom Struggles (Lithuanian: Laisvės kovos), refer to three wars Lithuania fought defending its independence at the end of World War I: with Bolshevik forces (December 1918 – August 1919), Bermontians
Bermontians
(June 1919 – December 1919), and Poland
Poland
(August 1920 – November 1920). The wars delayed international recognition of independent Lithuania and the formation of civil institutions.Contents1 Background 2 Formation of the army 3 War against the Bolsheviks 4 War against the Bermontians 5 War against Poland 6 Żeligowski's Mutiny 7 See also 8 References 9 Further readingBackground[edit] After the Partitions of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth
Partitions of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth
in 1795, the Grand Duchy of Lithuania
Lithuania
was annexed by the Russian Empire
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Red October (other)
Red October is another name for the October Revolution
October Revolution
of 1917 in Russia. Red October may also refer to:Red October (submarine), a fictitious submarine in the Tom Clancy novel and film The Hunt for Red October Oktober Guard, a fictional special operations unit in G.I
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Georgian–Ossetian Conflict (1918–20)
The Georgian–Ossetian conflict
Georgian–Ossetian conflict
of 1918–1920 comprised a series of uprisings, which took place in the Ossetian-inhabited areas of what is now South Ossetia, a breakaway republic in Georgia, against the Transcaucasian Democratic Federative Republic
Transcaucasian Democratic Federative Republic
and then the Menshevik-dominated Democratic Republic of Georgia
Democratic Republic of Georgia
which claimed several thousand lives and left painful memories among the Georgian and Ossetian communities of the region. During its brief tenure, the Menshevik government of Georgia came across significant problems with ethnic Ossetians
Ossetians
who largely sympathized with the Bolsheviks
Bolsheviks
and Soviet Russia. The reasons behind the conflict were complicated
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April Crisis
This page uses old style dates. The April Crisis, which occurred in Russia
Russia
in April 1917, broke out in response to a series of political and public controversies. Conflict over Russia's foreign policy goals tested the Dual Power arrangement between the Petrograd Soviet
Petrograd Soviet
and the Russian Provisional Government. The Executive Committee and the full Soviet endorsed N.N. Sukhanov's "An Appeal to All the Peoples of the World," which renounced war and "acquisitionist ambitions." This appeal conflicted with the Provisional Government's position on annexations, and Foreign Minister Pavel Milyukov
Pavel Milyukov
responded with the Milyukov note on 18 April, declaring Russia's right to Constantinople
Constantinople
and the Dardanelles. Newspapers printed Milyukov's note on 20 April
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Armenian–Azerbaijani War
The Armenian–Azerbaijani War, which started after the Russian Revolution, was a series of brutal and hard-to-classify conflicts in 1918, then from 1920–22 that occurred during the brief independence of Armenia
Armenia
and Azerbaijan
Azerbaijan
and afterwards. Most of the conflicts did not have a principal pattern with a standard armed structure. The Ottoman Empire
Ottoman Empire
and British Empire
British Empire
were involved in different capacities: the Ottoman Empire
Ottoman Empire
left the region after the Armistice of Mudros but British influence continued until Dunsterforce
Dunsterforce
was pulled back in the 1920s
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Tambov Rebellion
Mikhail Tukhachevsky Vladimir Antonov-Ovseyenko Alexander Schlichter Ieronim Uborevich Grigory Kotovsky Sergey KamenevStrengthProbably 20,000 regular and 20,000 militiamen [1]14,000 (August 1920) [2] 50,000 (October 1920) [3] 40,000 [4] - 70,000 [5] (February 1921) 1,000 (September 1921) [4] 5,000 (November 1920) [3] 50,000 [6] - 100,000 [7] (March 1921)Casualties and losses50,000 civilian internees in fields[4] 140,000 dead.[8]v t eTheaters of the Russian Civil WarOctober Revolution Left-wing uprisings Allied Intervention (Siberia, North Russia)NorthernVaga River Bolshie OzerkiWesternFinland Heimosodat Estonia Latvia LithuaniaSouthernUkraine West Ukraine Poland Ossetia Georgia Armenia and AzerbaijanSoviet invasion of AzerbaijanTambovEasternYakutiaCentral AsianBasmachiv t eSouthern Front of the Russian Civil WarKharkiv (1
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