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Comparison
Comparison
or comparing is the act of evaluating two or more things by determining the relevant characteristics of each thing to be compared, and then determining which characteristics of each are similar to the other, which are different, and to what degree. Where characteristics are different, the differences may then be evaluated to determine which thing is best suited for a particular purpose. The description of similarities and differences found between the two things is also called a comparison
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Comparison (other)
Comparison
Comparison
is the one for which things compare
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Much Ado About Nothing
Much Ado
Much Ado
About Nothing is a comedy by William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare
thought to have been written in 1598 and 1599, as Shakespeare was approaching the middle of his career. The play was included in the First Folio, published in 1623. By means of "noting" (which, in Shakespeare's day, sounded similar to "nothing" as in the play's title,[1][2] and which means gossip, rumour, and overhearing), Benedick
Benedick
and Beatrice are tricked into confessing their love for each other, and Claudio is tricked into rejecting Hero at the altar on the erroneous belief that she has been unfaithful
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Émile Durkheim
David Émile Durkheim
Émile Durkheim
(French: [emil dyʁkɛm] or [dyʁkajm];[1] April 15, 1858 – November 15, 1917) was a French sociologist. He formally established the academic discipline and—with Karl Marx
Karl Marx
and Max Weber—is commonly cited as the principal architect of modern social science.[2][3] Much of Durkheim's work was concerned with how societies could maintain their integrity and coherence in modernity; an era in which traditional social and religious ties are no longer assumed, and in which new social institutions have come into being. His first major sociological work was The Division of Labour in Society
The Division of Labour in Society
(1893)
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Simile
A simile (/ˈsɪməli/) is a figure of speech that directly compares two things.[1][2] Although similes and metaphors are similar, similes explicitly use connecting words (such as like, as, so, than, or various verbs such as resemble),[1] though these specific words are not always necessary.[3] While similes are mainly used in forms of poetry that compare the inanimate and the living, there are also terms in which similes and personifications are used for humorous purposes and comparison.Contents1 Uses1.1 In literature 1.2 In comedy2 In languages other than English2.1 Arabic 2.2 Vietnamese3 See also 4 ReferencesUses[edit] In literature[edit]"O My Luve's like a red, red rose." "A Red, Red Rose," by Robert Burns.[1][4] John Milton, Paradise Lost, a Homeric simile:[5]As when a prowling Wolf, Whom hunger drives to seek new haunt for prey, Watching where Shepherds pen thir Flocks at eve In hurdl'd Cotes amid the field secure, Le
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Figure Of Speech
A figure of speech or rhetorical figure[1] is figurative language in the form of a single word or phrase. It can be a special repetition, arrangement or omission of words with literal meaning, or a phrase with a specialized meaning not based on the literal meaning of the words.[dubious – discuss] Figures of speech often provide emphasis, freshness of expression, or clarity
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Metaphor
A metaphor is a figure of speech that directly refers to one thing by mentioning another for rhetorical effect.[1] It may provide clarity or identify hidden similarities between two ideas. Antithesis, hyperbole, metonymy and simile are all types of metaphor.[2] One of the most commonly cited examples of a metaphor in English literature is the "All the world's a stage" monologue from As You Like It:All the world's a stage, And all the men and women merely players; They have their exits and their entrances ... —William Shakespeare, As You Like It, 2/7[3]This quotation expresses a metaphor because the world is not literally a stage. By asserting that the world is a stage, Shakespeare uses points of comparison between the world and a stage to convey an understanding about the mechanics of the world and the behavior of the people within it. The Philosophy of Rhetoric
Rhetoric
(1937) by rhetorician I. A
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John Lydgate
John Lydgate
John Lydgate
of Bury (c. 1370 – c. 1451)[1] was a monk and poet, born in Lidgate, near Haverhill, Suffolk, England. Lydgate's poetic output is prodigious, amounting, at a conservative count, to about 145,000 lines. He explored and established every major Chaucerian
Chaucerian
genre, except such as were manifestly unsuited to his profession, like the fabliau. In the Troy Book
Troy Book
(30,117 lines), an amplified translation of the Trojan history of the thirteenth-century Latin writer Guido delle Colonne, commissioned by Prince Henry (later Henry V), he moved deliberately beyond Chaucer's Knight's Tale
Knight's Tale
and his Troilus, to provide a full-scale epic. The Siege of Thebes (4716 lines) is a shorter excursion in the same field of chivalric epic
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William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare
Shakespeare
(/ˈʃeɪkspɪər/; 26 April 1564 (baptised) – 23 April 1616)[a] was an English poet, playwright and actor, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre-eminent dramatist.[2][3][4] He is often called England's national poet and the "Bard of Avon".[5][b] His extant works, including collaborations, consist of approximately 39 plays,[c] 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems and a few other verses, some of uncertain authorship. His plays have been translated into every major living language and are performed more often than those of any other playwright.[7] Shakespeare
Shakespeare
was born and brought up in Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwickshire. At the age of 18, he married Anne Hathaway, with whom he had three children: Susanna and twins Hamnet and Judith
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Miguel De Cervantes
Miguel de Cervantes
Miguel de Cervantes
Saavedra[b] (/sərˈvæntiːz/;[3] Spanish: [miˈɣel de θerˈβantes saaˈβeðɾa]; 29 September 1547 (assumed) – 23 April 1616 N.S.)[4] was a Spanish writer who is widely regarded as the greatest writer in the Spanish language and one of the world's pre-eminent novelists. His masterpiece Don Quixote has been translated into more languages than any other book except the Bible. His major work, Don Quixote, sometimes considered the first modern novel,[5] is a classic of Western literature, regarded among the best works of fiction ever written.[6] His influence on the Spanish language has been so great that the language is often called la lengua de Cervantes ("the language of Cervantes").[7] He has also been dubbed El príncipe de los ingenios ("The Prince of Wits").[8] In 1569, in forced exile from Castile, Cervantes moved to Rome, where he worked as chamber assistant of a cardinal
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Sociology
Sociology
Sociology
is the study of society, patterns of social relationships, social interaction and culture of everyday life.[1][2][3][4] It is a social science that uses various methods of empirical investigation[5] and critical analysis[6] to develop a body of knowledge about social order, acceptance, and change or social evolution. While some sociologists conduct research that may be applied directly to social policy and welfare, others focus primarily on refining the theoretical understanding of social processes. Subject matter ranges from the micro-sociology level of individual agency and interaction to the macro level of systems and the social structure.[7] The different traditional focuses of sociology include social stratification, social class, social mobility, religion, secularization, law, sexuality, gender, and deviance
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Don Quixote
Don Quixote
Don Quixote
(/ˌdɒn kiːˈhoʊti, ˌdɒn ˈkwɪksoʊt/;[1] Spanish: [doŋ kiˈxote] ( listen)), fully titled The Ingenious Nobleman Sir Quixote of La Mancha
La Mancha
(Early Modern Spanish: El Ingenioso Hidalgo Don Quixote
Don Quixote
de la Mancha or EL INGENIOSO HIDALGO DON QVIXOTE DE LA MANCHA; Modern Spanish: El Ingenioso Hidalgo Don Quijote de la Mancha, pronounced [el iŋxeˈnjoso iˈðalɣo ðoŋ kiˈxote ðe la ˈmantʃa]), is a Spanish novel by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra. Published in two volumes, in 1605 and 1615, Don Quixote
Don Quixote
is considered the most influential work of literature from the Spanish Golden Age and the entire Spanish literary canon
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a digital object identifier (DOI) is a persistent identifier or handle used to identify objects uniquely, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to identify their referents uniquely
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PubMed Central
PubMed
PubMed
Central (PMC) is a free digital repository that archives publicly accessible full-text scholarly articles that have been published within the biomedical and life sciences journal literature. As one of the major research databases within the suite of resources that have been developed by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), PubMed
PubMed
Central is much more than just a document repository
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PubMed Identifier
PubMed
PubMed
is a free search engine accessing primarily the MEDLINE database of references and abstracts on life sciences and biomedical topics. The United States National Library of Medicine
United States National Library of Medicine
(NLM) at the National Institutes of Health
National Institutes of Health
maintains the database as part of the Entrez
Entrez
system of information retrieval.[1] From 1971 to 1997, MEDLINE online access to the MEDLARS Online computerized database primarily had been through institutional facilities, such as university libraries
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International Standard Book Number
The International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique.[a][b] Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each separate edition and variation (except reprintings) of a publication. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book will each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is ten digits long if assigned before 2007, and thirteen digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-specific and varies between countries, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book
Book
Numbering (SBN) created in 1966
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