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Obersturmführer
Obersturmführer
Obersturmführer
([ˈoːbɐ.ʃtʊʁm.fyːʀɐ], "senior storm leader") was a Nazi Party
Nazi Party
paramilitary rank that was used in several Nazi organisations, such as the SA, SS, NSKK and the NSFK. The term is translated as “senior assault (or storm) leader”.[1] [2] The rank of Obersturmführer
Obersturmführer
was first created in 1932 as the result of an expansion of the Sturmabteilung
Sturmabteilung
(SA) and the need for an additional rank in the officer corps. Obersturmführer
Obersturmführer
also became an SS rank at that same time.[3] An SA- Obersturmführer
Obersturmführer
was typically a junior company commander in charge of fifty to a hundred men
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KZ Mauthausen
Coordinates: 48°15′25″N 14°30′04″E / 48.25694°N 14.50111°E / 48.25694; 14.50111Mauthausen–GusenConcentration campGate to the garage yard in the Mauthausen
Mauthausen
concentration campLocation of Mauthausen–Gusen in AustriaOther names Mauthausen, GusenLocation in and around Mauthausen
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Wehrmacht
The Wehrmacht (German pronunciation: [ˈveːɐ̯maxt] ( listen), lit. "defence force")[N 2] were the unified armed forces of Nazi Germany
Nazi Germany
from 1935 to 1946. It consisted of the Heer (army), the Kriegsmarine
Kriegsmarine
(navy) and the Luftwaffe
Luftwaffe
(air force).[4] The designation Wehrmacht
Wehrmacht
replaced the previously used term Reichswehr, and was the manifestation of Nazi Germany's efforts to rearm the nation to a greater extent than the Treaty of Versailles
Treaty of Versailles
permitted.[5] After the Nazi seizure of power
Nazi seizure of power
in 1933, one of Adolf Hitler's most overt and audacious moves was to establish the Wehrmacht, a modern armed force fully capable of offensive use
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SS-Stabsscharführer
SS-Stabsscharführer was a non-commissioned officer title which was used by the Waffen-SS
Waffen-SS
between the years of 1938 to 1945. SS-Stabsscharführer was not an actual SS rank, but rather a positional title held by the senior SS-NCO of a company, battalion, or regiment. Typically, those holding the position of Stabsscharführer ranked SS- Oberscharführer
Oberscharführer
(OR-6) or SS- Hauptscharführer
Hauptscharführer
(OR-7) above. Translated as "staff squad leader", the position of SS-Stabsscharführer was denoted by a special sleeve chevron, worn on the upper right shoulder of the field grey SS uniform. Those holding the function of SS-Stabsscharführer had to be addressed Stabsscharführer regardless of the actual rank title Hauptscharführer, Oberscharführe, etc
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Zugführer (military)
Zugführer is a military appointment to a sub-subunit leader, e.g. platoon leader, belonging to the Non-commissioned officer (NCO) rank group or junior officer. A Zugführer leads or commands normally a subunit that is called in German language Zug (en: platoon, platoon-size unit, or detachment).Contents1 Germany1.1 Nazi Germany2 Switzerland 3 Austria 4 ReferencesGermany[edit] Zugführer (ZgFhr) of the Bundeswehr
Bundeswehr
is an appointment. The Zugführer is a subunit leader and commands a Zug (in the following platoon) that – depending on the service, branch, or branch of service – normally contains 30 to 60 service members or soldiers. The Bundeswehr platoon consists of some groups; some platoons build a company (infantry), battery (artillery), or squadron (Air Force). To the appointment of Zugführer might be assigned normally an officer (2nd lieutenant of 1st lieutenant to the I. and II
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Gorget Patches
Gorget
Gorget
patches (collar tabs, collar patches) are an insignia, paired patches of cloth or metal on the collar (gorget) of the uniform, that is used in the military and civil service in some countries
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Shoulder Mark
A shoulder mark, also called an epaulette, shoulder board, rank slide, or slip-on ,[1] is a flat cloth sleeve worn on the shoulder strap of a uniform. It may bear rank or other insignia.Contents1 Australia 2 Canada 3 United States3.1 Military 3.2 Boy Scouts of America4 United Kingdom4.1 Royal Navy 4.2 Army 4.3 Royal Air Force 4.4 St. John Ambulance 4.5 Police5 References 6 Notes 7 External linksAustralia[edit] The newer Auscam
Auscam
uniform design lacks shoulder marks, instead opting for a vertical strap in the middle of the chest region of the uniform. Rank insignia tags are slipped onto this strap. Unlike the older uniform designs, there are slip-ons for every rank in the Australian Defence Force.[citation needed] The older Auscam
Auscam
uniform designs featured shoulder straps, upon which slip-on rank insignia of Commissioned Officers could be affixed, and non-commissioned officers in the Air Force and Navy only
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Military Camouflage
Military camouflage
Military camouflage
is the use of camouflage by a military force to protect personnel and equipment from observation by enemy forces. In practice, this means applying colour and materials to military equipment of all kinds, including vehicles, ships, aircraft, gun positions and battledress, either to conceal it from observation (crypsis), or to make it appear as something else (mimicry). The French slang word camouflage came into common English usage during World War I
World War I
when the concept of visual deception developed into an essential part of modern military tactics. In that war, long-range artillery and observation from the air combined to expand the field of fire, and camouflage was widely used to decrease the danger of being targeted or to enable surprise
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Concentration Camp
Internment
Internment
is the imprisonment or confinement[1] of people, commonly in large groups, without trial. The term is especially used for the confinement "of enemy citizens in wartime or of terrorism suspects".[2] Thus, while it can simply mean imprisonment, it tends to refer to preventive confinement, rather than confinement after having been convicted of some crime. Use of these terms is subject to debate and political sensitivities.[3] Interned persons may be held in prisons or in facilities known as internment camps
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National Socialist Motor Corps
The National Socialist Motor Corps
National Socialist Motor Corps
(German: Nationalsozialistisches Kraftfahrkorps, NSKK)[1] was a paramilitary organization of the Nazi Party (NSDAP) that officially existed from May 1931 to 1945. The group was a successor organization to the older National Socialist Automobile Corps (NSAK), which had existed since April 1930. The NSKK served as a training organization, mainly instructing members in the operation and maintenance of high-performance motorcycles and automobiles. The NSKK was further used to transport NSDAP and SA officials/members. The NSKK also served as a roadside assistance group in the mid-1930s, comparable to the modern-day American Automobile Association or the British Automobile Association. With the outbreak of World War II
World War II
NSKK ranks were recruited to serve in the transport corps of various German military branches
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Sturmabteilung
The Sturmabteilung
Sturmabteilung
(SA; German pronunciation: [ˈʃtʊɐ̯mʔapˌtaɪlʊŋ] ( listen)), literally Storm Detachment, functioned as the original paramilitary wing of the Nazi Party (NSDAP). It played a significant role in Adolf Hitler's rise to power in the 1920s and 1930s
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Female Guards In Nazi Concentration Camps
The Aufseherinnen were female guards in Nazi concentration camps during the Holocaust. Of the 55,000 guards who served in Nazi concentration camps, about 3,700 were women. In 1942, the first female guards arrived at Auschwitz
Auschwitz
and Majdanek
Majdanek
from Ravensbrück. The year after, the Nazis began conscripting women because of a guard shortage. The German title for this position, Aufseherin (plural Aufseherinnen) means female overseer or attendant
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Schutzstaffel
The Schutzstaffel
Schutzstaffel
(SS; also stylized as with Armanen runes; German pronunciation: [ˈʃʊtsˌʃtafl̩] ( listen); literally "Protection Squadron") was a major paramilitary organization under Adolf Hitler
Adolf Hitler
and the Nazi Party
Nazi Party
(NSDAP) in Nazi Germany, and later throughout German-occupied Europe
German-occupied Europe
during World War II. It began with a small guard unit known as the Saal-Schutz ("Hall Security") made up of NSDAP
NSDAP
volunteers to provide security for party meetings in Munich. In 1925 Heinrich Himmler
Heinrich Himmler
joined the unit, which had by then been reformed and given its final name. Under his direction (1929–45) it grew from a small paramilitary formation to one of the most powerful organizations in Nazi Germany
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Gestapo
The Gestapo
Gestapo
(German pronunciation: [ɡeˈstaːpo, ɡəˈʃtaːpo] ( listen)), abbreviation of Geheime Staatspolizei (Secret State Police),[2][3] was the official secret police of Nazi Germany
Nazi Germany
and German-occupied Europe. The force was created by Hermann Göring
Hermann Göring
in 1933 by combining the various security police agencies of Prussia
Prussia
into one organisation. Beginning on 20 April 1934 it passed to the administration of Schutzstaffel
Schutzstaffel
(SS) national leader Heinrich Himmler, who in 1936 was appointed Chief of German Police (Chef der Deutschen Polizei) by Hitler. The Gestapo
Gestapo
at this time becoming a national rather than a Prussian state agency as a suboffice of the Sicherheitspolizei
Sicherheitspolizei
(SiPo) (Security Police)
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