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ONE-NET
ONE-NET is an open-source standard for wireless networking.[1][2] ONE-NET was designed for low-cost, low-power (battery-operated) control networks for applications such as home automation, security & monitoring, device control, and sensor networks. ONE-NET is not tied to any proprietary hardware or software, and can be implemented with a variety of low-cost off-the-shelf radio transceivers and micro controllers from a number of different manufacturers.[3]Contents1 Wireless
Wireless
Transmission 2 Network Characteristics 3 Power Management 4 Security 5 Hardware 6 Open Source License 7 Supporting Companies 8 References 9 External links Wireless
Wireless
Transmission[edit] ONE-NET uses UHF ISM radio transceivers and currently operates in the 868 MHz and 915 MHz frequencies with 25 channels available for use in the United States
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Open-source
The open-source model is a decentralized software-development model that encourages open collaboration.[1][2] A main principle of open-source software development is peer production, with products such as source code, blueprints, and documentation freely available to the public. The open-source movement in software began as a response to the limitations of proprietary code. The model is used for projects such as in open-source appropriate technology,[3] and open-source drug discovery.[4][5] Open source
Open source
promotes universal access via an open-source or free license to a product's design or blueprint, and universal redistribution of that design or blueprint.[6][7] Before the phrase open source became widely adopted, developers and producers used a variety of other terms
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Consumer IR
Consumer IR, consumer infrared, or CIR, refers to a wide variety of devices employing the infrared electromagnetic spectrum for wireless communications. Most commonly found in television remote controls, infrared ports are equally ubiquitous in consumer electronics, such as PDAs, laptops, and computers. The functionality of CIR is as broad as the consumer electronics that carry it
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Bluetooth
Bluetooth
Bluetooth
is a wireless technology standard for exchanging data over short distances (using short-wavelength UHF
UHF
radio waves in the ISM band from 2.4 to 2.485 GHz[3]) from fixed and mobile devices, and building personal area networks (PANs). Invented by telecom vendor Ericsson
Ericsson
in 1994,[4] it was originally conceived as a wireless alternative to RS-232
RS-232
data cables. Bluetooth
Bluetooth
is managed by the Bluetooth Special Interest Group
Bluetooth Special Interest Group
(SIG), which has more than 30,000 member companies in the areas of telecommunication, computing, networking, and consumer electronics.[5] The IEEE standardized Bluetooth
Bluetooth
as IEEE 802.15.1, but no longer maintains the standard
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Bluetooth Low Energy
Bluetooth
Bluetooth
Low Energy ( Bluetooth
Bluetooth
LE, BLE, formerly marketed as Bluetooth
Bluetooth
Smart[1]) is a wireless personal area network technology designed and marketed by the Bluetooth
Bluetooth
Special
Special
Interest Group ( Bluetooth
Bluetooth
SIG) aimed at novel applications in the healthcare, fitness, beacons,[2] security, and home entertainment industries.[3] Compared to Classic Bluetooth, Bluetooth
Bluetooth
Low Energy is intended to provide considerably reduced power consumption and cost while maintaining a similar communication range. Mobile operating systems including iOS, Android, Windows Phone
Windows Phone
and BlackBerry, as well as macOS, Linux, Windows 8
Windows 8
and Windows 10, natively support Bluetooth
Bluetooth
Low Energy
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Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications
Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications
Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications
(Digital European Cordless Telecommunications), usually known by the acronym DECT, is a standard primarily used for creating cordless telephone systems. It originated in Europe, where it is the universal standard, replacing earlier cordless phone standards, such as 900 MHz CT1 and CT2.[1] Beyond Europe, it has been adopted by Australia, and most countries in Asia
Asia
and South America. North American adoption was delayed by United States radio frequency regulations. This forced development of a variation of DECT, called DECT 6.0, using a slightly different frequency range which makes these units incompatible with systems intended for use in other areas, even from the same manufacturer
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EnOcean
The EnOcean
EnOcean
technology is an energy harvesting wireless technology used primarily in building automation systems, and is also applied to other applications in industry, transportation, logistics and smart homes. Modules based on EnOcean
EnOcean
technology combine micro energy converters with ultra low power electronics, and enable wireless communications between batteryless wireless sensors, switches, controllers and gateways. In March 2012, the EnOcean
EnOcean
wireless standard was ratified as the international standard ISO/IEC 14543-3-10.[1] The standard covers the OSI (Open Systems Interconnection) layers 1-3 which are the physical, data link and networking layers. The energy harvesting wireless modules are manufactured and marketed by the company EnOcean
EnOcean
which is based in Oberhaching, Germany
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General Packet Radio Service
General Packet Radio Service
General Packet Radio Service
(GPRS) is a packet oriented mobile data service on the 2G and 3G cellular communication system's global system for mobile communications (GSM). GPRS was originally standardized by European Telecommunications Standards Institute
European Telecommunications Standards Institute
(ETSI) in response to the earlier CDPD and i-mode packet-switched cellular technologies. It is now maintained by the 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP).[1][2] GPRS usage is typically charged based on volume of data transferred, contrasting with circuit switched data, which is usually billed per minute of connection time. Sometimes billing time is broken down to every third of a minute
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MyriaNed
MyriaNed
MyriaNed
is a wireless sensor network (WSN) platform developed by DevLab. It uses an epidemic communication style based on standard radio broadcasting. This approach reflects the way humans interact, which is called gossiping.[1] Messages are sent periodically and received by adjoining neighbours. Each message is repeated and duplicated towards all nodes that span the network; it spreads like a virus (hence the term epidemic communication). This is a very efficient and robust[2][3] protocol, mainly for two reasons:First, the nodes do not need to know who is in their neighbourhood at the time of sending a message, there is no notion of an a-priori planned Routing, data is just shared instantaneously. Second, the network is implicitly reliable since messages may follow different communication routes in parallel
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Universal Mobile Telecommunications System
The Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) is a third generation mobile cellular system for networks based on the GSM standard. Developed and maintained by the 3GPP (3rd Generation Partnership Project), UMTS
UMTS
is a component of the International Telecommunications Union IMT-2000 standard set and compares with the CDMA2000
CDMA2000
standard set for networks based on the competing cdmaOne technology
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Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
or WiFi (/ˈwaɪfaɪ/) is a technology for wireless local area networking with devices based on the IEEE 802.11
IEEE 802.11
standards. Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
is a trademark of the Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
Alliance, which restricts the use of the term Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
Certified to products that successfully complete interoperability certification testing.[1] Devices that can use Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
technology include personal computers, video-game consoles, phones and tablets, digital cameras, smart TVs, digital audio players and modern printers. Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
compatible devices can connect to the Internet
Internet
via a WLAN and a wireless access point. Such an access point (or hotspot) has a range of about 20 meters (66 feet) indoors and a greater range outdoors
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Infrared
Infrared
Infrared
radiation (IR) is electromagnetic radiation (EMR) with longer wavelengths than those of visible light, and is therefore generally invisible to the human eye (although IR at wavelengths up to 1050 nm from specially pulsed lasers can be seen by humans under certain conditions [1][2][3][4]). It is sometimes called infrared light. IR wavelengths extend from the nominal red edge of the visible spectrum at 700 nanometers (frequency 430 THz), to 1 millimeter (300 GHz)[5] Most of the thermal radiation emitted by objects near room temperature is infrared
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Insteon
Insteon
Insteon
is a home automation (domotics) technology that enables light switches, lights, thermostats, leak sensors, remote controls, motion sensors, and other electrically powered devices to interoperate through power lines, radio frequency (RF) communications, or both.[1] It employs a dual-mesh networking topology[2] in which all devices are peers and each device independently transmits, receives, and repeats messages.[3] Like other home automation systems, it has been associated with the Internet of Things.[4] Insteon-based products were launched in 2005 by Smartlabs,[5] the company which holds the trademark for Insteon.[6] A Smartlabs subsidiary, also named Insteon, was created to market the technology.[7] According to a press release on June 13, SmartLabs and its Insteon technology has been acquired by Richmond Capital Partners with Rob Lilleness of Universal Electronics assuming the role of chairman and CEO
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Technical Standard
A technical standard is an established norm or requirement in regard to technical systems. It is usually a formal document that establishes uniform engineering or technical criteria, methods, processes and practices. In contrast, a custom, convention, company product, corporate standard, and so forth that becomes generally accepted and dominant is often called a de facto standard. A technical standard may be developed privately or unilaterally, for example by a corporation, regulatory body, military, etc. Standards can also be developed by groups such as trade unions, and trade associations. Standards organizations
Standards organizations
often have more diverse input and usually develop voluntary standards: these might become mandatory if adopted by a government (i.e
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KNX (standard)
KNX is a standardised (EN 50090, ISO/IEC 14543), OSI-based network communications protocol for building automation. KNX is the successor to, and convergence of, three previous standards: the European Home Systems Protocol (EHS), BatiBUS, and the European Installation Bus (EIB or Instabus)
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IEEE 1394
IEEE 1394
IEEE 1394
is an interface standard for a serial bus for high-speed communications and isochronous real-time data transfer. It was developed in the late 1980s and early 1990s by Apple, which called it FireWire. The 1394 interface is also known by the brands i.LINK (Sony), and Lynx (Texas Instruments). The copper cable it uses in its most common implementation can be up to 4.5 metres (15 ft) long. Power is also carried over this cable, allowing devices with moderate power requirements to operate without a separate power supply
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