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Nylon
Nylon
Nylon
is a generic designation for a family of synthetic polymers, based on aliphatic or semi-aromatic polyamides. Nylon
Nylon
is a thermoplastic silky material[1] that can be melt-processed into fibers, films or shapes.[2]:2 Nylon
Nylon
was the first commercially successful synthetic thermoplastic polymer.[3] DuPont
DuPont
began its research project in 1930
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World War I
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
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American Chemical Society
The American Chemical Society
Chemical Society
(ACS) is a scientific society based in the United States
United States
that supports scientific inquiry in the field of chemistry. Founded in 1876 at New York University, the ACS currently has more than 158,000 members at all degree levels and in all fields of chemistry, chemical engineering, and related fields. It is the world's largest scientific society by membership.[2] The ACS is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization and holds a congressional charter under Title 36 of the United States
United States
Code. Its headquarters are located in Washington, D.C., and it has a large concentration of staff in Columbus, Ohio. The ACS is a leading source of scientific information through its peer-reviewed scientific journals, national conferences, and the Chemical Abstracts Service
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Peptide Bonds
A peptide bond, also known as an amide bond, is a covalent chemical bond linking two consecutive amino acid monomers along a peptide or protein chain.[1][2][3][4][5]Contents1 Synthesis 2 Degradation 3 Spectra 4 Cis/trans isomers of the peptide group 5 Chemical reactions 6 See also 7 ReferencesSynthesis[edit] Peptide
Peptide
bond formation Glycine
Glycine
condensationWhen two amino acids form a dipeptide through a peptide bond it is called condensation. In condensation, two amino acids approach each other, with the acid moiety of one coming near the amino moiety of the other. One loses a hydrogen and oxygen from its carboxyl group (COOH) and the other loses a hydrogen from its amino group (NH2). This reaction produces a molecule of water (H2O) and two amino acids joined by a peptide bond (-CO-NH-)
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World's Fair
A world's fair, world fair, world expo, or universal exposition (sometimes expo or Expo for short) is a large international exhibition designed to showcase achievements of nations. These exhibitions vary in character and are held in different parts of the world. The most recent international exhibition, Expo 2017, was held in Astana, Kazakhstan. Since the 1928 Convention Relating to International Exhibitions came into force, the Bureau International des Expositions
Bureau International des Expositions
(BIE; English: International Bureau of Exhibitions) has served as an international sanctioning body for world's fairs
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IG Farben
IG Farben
IG Farben
was a German chemical and pharmaceutical industry conglomerate. Its name was taken from Interessen-Gemeinschaft Farbenindustrie AktienGesellschaft (Plc Syndicate [literally, "community of interests"] of dye-making corporations). The company was formed in 1925 from a number of major chemical companies that had been working together closely since World War I; as a monopoly-seeking conglomerate it was largely modeled after the American company Standard Oil, and it was closely connected to Standard Oil's successor companies. During its heyday, IG Farben
IG Farben
was both the largest company in Europe overall and the largest chemical and pharmaceutical company in the world.[1] IG Farben
IG Farben
scientists made fundamental contributions to all areas of chemistry and the pharmaceutical industry
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Ammonia
Trihydrogen nitride Nitrogen
Nitrogen
trihydrideIdentifiersCAS Number7664-41-7 Y3D model (JSmol)Interactive image3DMet B00004Beilstein Reference3587154ChEBICHEBI:16134 YChEMBLChEMBL1160819 YChemSpider217 YECHA InfoCard 100.028.760EC Number 231-635-3Gmelin Reference79KEGGD02916 YMeSH Ammonia PubChem CID222
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Great Depression
The Great Depression
Great Depression
was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression
Great Depression
varied across nations; in most countries it started in 1929 and lasted until the late-1930s.[1] It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century.[2] In the 21st century, the Great Depression
Great Depression
is commonly used as an example of how far the world's economy can decline.[3] The Great Depression
Great Depression
started in the United States
United States
after a major fall in stock prices that began around September 4, 1929, and became worldwide news with the stock market crash of October 29, 1929 (known as Black Tuesday). Between 1929 and 1932, worldwide gross domestic product (GDP) fell by an estimated 15%
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Chemical Engineering
Chemical engineering
Chemical engineering
is a branch of engineering that uses principles of chemistry, applied physics, life sciences (microbiology and biochemistry), applied mathematics and economics to efficiently use, produce, transform, and transport chemicals, materials and energy
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Thin Film
A thin film is a layer of material ranging from fractions of a nanometer (monolayer) to several micrometers in thickness. The controlled synthesis of materials as thin films (a process referred to as deposition) is a fundamental step in many applications. A familiar example is the household mirror, which typically has a thin metal coating on the back of a sheet of glass to form a reflective interface. The process of silvering was once commonly used to produce mirrors, while more recently the metal layer is deposited using techniques such as sputtering. Advances in thin film deposition techniques during the 20th century have enabled a wide range of technological breakthroughs in areas such as magnetic recording media, electronic semiconductor devices, LEDs, optical coatings (such as antireflective coatings), hard coatings on cutting tools, and for both energy generation (e.g. thin-film solar cells) and storage (thin-film batteries)
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DuPont Experimental Station
Station
Station
may refer to:Contents1 Agriculture and geography 2 Communications 3 Infrastructure 4 Military and government 5 Music, film, and entertainment 6 Places 7 Transport 8 Other uses 9 See alsoAgriculture and geography[edit]Cattle station, an Australian term for a large farm Gauging station, a location along a river or stream used for gauging or other measurements Hill station, a town which is high enough to be relatively cool in summer Sheep station, a large property (equivalent of a ranch) in Australia and New Zealand
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Aliphatic
In organic chemistry, hydrocarbons (compounds composed of carbon and hydrogen) are divided into two classes: aromatic compounds and aliphatic compounds (/ˌælɪˈfætɪk/; G. aleiphar, fat, oil) also known as non-aromatic compounds. Aliphatics can be cyclic, but only aromatic compounds contain an especially stable ring of atoms, such as benzene.[1] Aliphatic compounds can be saturated, like hexane, or unsaturated, like hexene and hexyne. Open-chain compounds (whether straight or branched) contain no rings of any type, and are thus aliphatic.Contents1 Structure 2 Properties 3 Examples of aliphatic compounds / non-aromatic 4 ReferencesStructure[edit] Aliphatic compounds can be saturated, joined by single bonds (alkanes), or unsaturated, with double bonds (alkenes) or triple bonds (alkynes)
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Electrical Conductivity
Electrical resistivity (also known as resistivity, specific electrical resistance, or volume resistivity) is a fundamental property that quantifies how strongly a given material opposes the flow of electric current. A low resistivity indicates a material that readily allows the flow of electric current. Resistivity is commonly represented by the Greek letter ρ (rho). The SI unit of electrical resistivity is the ohm-metre (Ω⋅m).[1][2][3] As an example, if a 1 m × 1 m × 1 m solid cube of material has sheet contacts on two opposite faces, and the resistance between these contacts is 1 Ω, then the resistivity of the material is 1 Ω⋅m. Electrical conductivity or specific conductance is the reciprocal of electrical resistivity, and measures a material's ability to conduct an electric current. It is commonly represented by the Greek letter σ (sigma), but κ (kappa) (especially in electrical engineering) or γ (gamma) are also occasionally used
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Siemens (unit)
The siemens (symbol: S) is the derived unit of electric conductance, electric susceptance and electric admittance in the International System of Units (SI). Conductance, susceptance, and admittance are the reciprocals of resistance, reactance, and impedance respectively; hence one siemens is redundantly equal to the reciprocal of one ohm, and is also referred to as the mho. The 14th General Conference on Weights and Measures approved the addition of the siemens as a derived unit in 1971. The unit is named after Ernst Werner von Siemens
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Fahrenheit
The Fahrenheit
Fahrenheit
scale is a temperature scale based on one proposed in 1724 by Dutch-German-Polish physicist Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686–1736).[1] It uses the degree Fahrenheit
Fahrenheit
(symbol: °F) as the unit
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