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Hostel
A hostel is a form of low-cost, short-term shared sociable lodging where guests can rent a bed, usually a bunk bed in a dormitory, with shared use of a lounge and sometimes a kitchen. Rooms can be mixed or single-sex and have private or shared bathrooms. Private rooms may also be available, but the property must offer dormitories to be considered a hostel.[1][2] Hostels are popular forms of lodging for backpackers, cycle tourists, and gap year travelers. They are part of the sharing economy.[3] Benefits of hostels include lower costs and opportunities to meet people from all over the world, find travel partners, and share travel ideas.[4] Each hostel, hostel chain or hostel association, such as Zostel in India or Hostelling International, caters to a niche market of travelers
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Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor
Henry III (28 October 1016 – 5 October 1056), called the Black or the Pious, was Holy Roman Emperor from 1046 until his death in 1056. A member of the Salian Dynasty, he was the eldest son of Emperor Conrad II of Germany and Gisela of Swabia.[1][2][3] Henry was raised by his father, who made him Duke of Bavaria in 1026, appointed him co-ruler in 1028 and bestowed him with the duchy of Swabia and the Kingdom of Burgundy ten years later in 1038.[4] The emperor's death the following year ended a remarkably smooth and harmonious transition process towards Henry's sovereign rule, that was rather uncharacteristic for the Ottonian and Salian monarchs.[4] Henry succeeded Conrad II as Duke of Carinthia and King of Italy and continued to pursue his father's political course on the basis of virtus et probitas (courage and honesty), which led to an unprecedented sacral exaltation of the kingship
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Conrad II, Holy Roman Emperor
Conrad II (c. 989/990 – 4 June 1039), also known as Conrad the Elder and Conrad the Salic, was Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire from 1027 until his death in 1039. The first of a succession of four Salian emperors, who reigned for one century until 1125, Conrad also served as King of Germany from 1024, King of Italy from 1026, and King of Burgundy (Arelat) from 1033. The son of Franconian count Henry of Speyer (also Henry of Worms) and Adelaide of Metz of the Matfriding dynasty, that had ruled the Duchy of Lorraine from 959 until 972, Conrad inherited the titles of count of Speyer and Worms during childhood after his father had died around the year 990. He extended his influence beyond his inherited lands, as he came into favor of the princes of the kingdom
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Regensburg
Regensburg [nb 1] is a city in south-east Germany, at the confluence of the Danube, Naab and Regen rivers. With more than 150,000 inhabitants, Regensburg is the fourth-largest city in the State of Bavaria after Munich, Nuremberg and Augsburg. The city is the political, economic and cultural centre and capital of the Upper Palatinate. During portions of the Holy Roman Empire rule it housed the Perpetual Diet of Regensburg. The medieval centre of the city is a UNESCO World Heritage Site
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Pegnitz (river)
The Pegnitz (German: [ˈpeːɡnɪt͡s] (listen)) is a river in Franconia in the German federal state of Bavaria. The Pegnitz has its source in the town of the same name at an altitude of 425 m (1,394 ft) and meets the Rednitz at 283 m (928 ft) in Fürth. From that point on the river is called Regnitz. But often esp. by local people the 15 km (9.3 mi) long Fichtenohe is regarded as upper course of the Pegnitz
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Saint Othmar
St. Othmar, O.S.B., (also Audomar, c. 689 – c. 759) was a monk and priest appointed as the first abbot of the Abbey of St. Gall, a Benedictine monastery around which grew up the town of St. Gallen, Switzerland. Othmar rebuilt the hermitage in which the Irish monk Saint Gall had lived and he is called the founder of the monastery at that site. As part of the reform movement of Church institutions pushed in Alamannia under the sons of Charles Martel, Carloman and Pepin, he introduced the Benedictine Rule in 747, which was to remain in effect until the secularization and closure of the monastery in 1805. It is also assumed that he founded the monastery school of the abbey, which was to become the foundation upon which the famous Stiftsbibliothek (Monastery library) was built
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Hungary

Hungary is a historically Christian country. Hungarian historiography identifies the foundation of the Hungarian state with Stephen I's baptism and coronation with the Holy Crown in A.D. 1000. Stephen promulgated Roman Catholicism as the state religion, and his successors were traditionally known as the Apostolic Kings. The Catholic Church in Hungary remained strong through the centuries, and the Archbishop of Esztergom was granted extraordinary temporal privileges as prince-primate (hercegprímás) of Hungary
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