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Numismatic Museum Of Athens
The Numismatic Museum in Athens
Athens
(Greek: Νομισματικό Μουσείο) is one of the most important museums of Greece
Greece
and houses one of the greatest collections of coins, ancient and modern, in the world. The museum itself is housed in the mansion of the archaeologist Heinrich Schliemann, formally known as Iliou Melathron (Greek: Ιλίου Μέλαθρον, "Palace of Ilion").Contents1 History 2 The Iliou Melathron 3 Collections 4 Location and visitors information 5 Gallery 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit]Façade close-up.The first tries of coin collecting by the state began shortly after the independence of Greece
Greece
in Aegina. The collection was enriched after excavations, purchases and donations
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Hoard
A hoard or "wealth deposit"[1] is an archaeological term for a collection of valuable objects or artifacts, sometimes purposely buried in the ground, in which case it is sometimes also known as a cache. This would usually be with the intention of later recovery by the hoarder; hoarders sometimes died or were unable to return for other reasons (forgetfulness or physical displacement from its location) before retrieving the hoard, and these surviving hoards might then be uncovered much later by metal detector hobbyists, members of the public, and archaeologists. Hoards provide a useful method of providing dates for artifacts through association as they can usually be assumed to be contemporary (or at least assembled during a decade or two), and therefore used in creating chronologies. Hoards can also be considered an indicator of the relative degree of unrest in ancient societies
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Ernst Ziller
The Ziller
Ziller
is an approximately 47 km long right-side tributary to the Inn River, in the Zillertal
Zillertal
in Tyrol, Austria. It springs from the ridge of the Zillertal
Zillertal
Alps, and feeds the Zillergründl Dam. In Mayrhofen
Mayrhofen
it receives the Zemmbach (that in turn receives the Tuxerbach). By Zell am Ziller
Zell am Ziller
it receives the Gerlosbach, before it flows into the Inn by Strass im Zillertal. For historical reasons, the Ziller
Ziller
for most of its course makes up the border between the Diocese of Innsbruck on the west and the Archdiocese of Salzburg on the east. The Ziller
Ziller
today shows a good presence of brown- and rainbow trout, as well as grayling
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Mycenae
Mycenae
Mycenae
(Greek: Μυκῆναι Mykēnai or Μυκήνη Mykēnē) is an archaeological site near Mikines
Mikines
in Greece, located about 90 kilometres (56 miles) southwest of Athens, in the north-eastern Peloponnese. Argos
Argos
is 11 kilometres (7 miles) to the south; Corinth, 48 kilometres (30 miles) to the north. From the hill on which the palace was located, one can see across the Argolid
Argolid
to the Saronic Gulf. In the second millennium BC, Mycenae
Mycenae
was one of the major centres of Greek civilization, a military stronghold which dominated much of southern Greece
Greece
and parts of southwest Anatolia. The period of Greek history from about 1600 BC to about 1100 BC is called Mycenaean in reference to Mycenae
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Crete
Crete
Crete
(Greek: Κρήτη, Kríti ['kriti]; Ancient Greek: Κρήτη, Krḗtē) is the largest and most populous of the Greek islands, the 88th largest island in the world and the fifth largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, after Sicily, Sardinia, Cyprus, and Corsica. Crete and a number of surrounding islands and islets constitute the region of Crete
Crete
(Greek: Περιφέρεια Κρήτης), one of the 13 top-level administrative units of Greece. The capital and the largest city is Heraklion. As of 2011[update], the region had a population of 623,065. Crete
Crete
forms a significant part of the economy and cultural heritage of Greece, while retaining its own local cultural traits (such as its own poetry and music). It was once the centre of the Minoan civilisation (c. 2700–1420 BC), which is the earliest known civilisation in Europe
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Epidaurus
Epidaurus
Epidaurus
(/ˌɛpɪˈdɔːrəs/; Ancient Greek: Ἐπίδαυρος, Epidauros) was a small city (polis) in ancient Greece, on the Argolid Peninsula at the Saronic Gulf. Two modern towns bear the name Epidavros (Greek: Επίδαυρος): Palaia Epidavros
Palaia Epidavros
and Nea Epidavros. Since 2010 they belong to the new municipality of Epidaurus, part of the regional unit of Argolis. The seat of the municipality is the town Lygourio.[2]Contents1 History 2 Theatre 3 Municipality 4 Gallery 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksHistory[edit] Epidaurus
Epidaurus
was independent of Argos
Argos
and not included in Argolis
Argolis
until the time of the Romans. With its supporting territory, it formed the small territory called Epidauria
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Ancient Corinth
Coordinates: 37°54′19″N 22°52′49″E / 37.9053455°N 22.8801924°E / 37.9053455; 22.8801924CorinthΚόρινθος700 BC–338 BCCapital CorinthLanguages Doric GreekReligion Greek PolytheismGovernment OligarchyHistorical era Classical Antiquity •  Founding 700 BC •  Cypselus 657–627 BC •  Dissolution 338 BCPreceded by Succeeded byGreek Dark AgesMacedonian Empire Corinth
Corinth
(/ˈkɔːrɪnθ/; Greek: Κόρινθος Kórinthos) was a city-state (polis) on the Isthmus of Corinth, the narrow stretch of land that joins the Peloponnese
Peloponnese
to the mainland of Greece, roughly halfway between Athens
Athens
and Sparta. The modern city of Corinth
Corinth
is located approximately 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) northeast of the ancient ruins
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Ottoman Empire
The Ottoman Empire (/ˈɒtəmən/; Devlet-i ʿAlīye-i ʿOsmānīye[dn 5]), also historically known in Western Europe
Europe
as the Turkish Empire[8] or simply Turkey,[9] was a state that controlled much of southeastern Europe, western Asia and northern Africa between the 14th and early 20th centuries. It was founded at the end of the 13th century in northwestern Anatolia
Anatolia
in the town of Söğüt (modern-day Bilecik Province) by the Oghuz Turkish tribal leader Osman.[10] After 1354, the Ottomans crossed into Europe, and with the conquest of the Balkans, the Ottoman Beylik was transformed into a transcontinental empire
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Byzantine Empire
The Byzantine
Byzantine
Empire, also referred to as the Eastern Roman Empire, was the continuation of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the East during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, when its capital city was Constantinople
Constantinople
(modern-day Istanbul, which had been founded as Byzantium). It survived the fragmentation and fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the 5th century AD and continued to exist for an additional thousand years until it fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1453.[2] During most of its existence, the empire was the most powerful economic, cultural, and military force in Europe
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Hellenistic Period
The Hellenistic
Hellenistic
period covers the period of Mediterranean
Mediterranean
history between the death of Alexander the Great
Alexander the Great
in 323 BC and the emergence of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
as signified by the Battle of Actium
Battle of Actium
in 31 BC[1] and the subsequent conquest of Ptolemaic Egypt
Egypt
the following year.[2] The Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
word Hellas (Ἑλλάς, Ellás) is the original word for Greece, from which the word "Hellenistic" was derived.[3] At this time, Greek cultural influence and power was at its peak in Europe, North Africa
North Africa
and Western Asia, experiencing prosperity and progress in the arts, exploration, literature, theatre, architecture, music, mathematics, philosophy, and science
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Polis
Polis
Polis
(/ˈpɒlɪs/; Greek: πόλις pronounced [pólis]), plural poleis (/ˈpɒleɪz/, πόλεις [póleːs]), literally means city in Greek. It can also mean a body of citizens. In modern historiography, polis is normally used to indicate the ancient Greek city-states, like Classical Athens
Classical Athens
and its contemporaries, and thus is often translated as "city-state". These cities consisted of a fortified city centre built on an acropolis or harbor and controlled surrounding territories of land (khôra). The Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
city-state developed during the Archaic period as the ancestor of city, state, and citizenship and persisted (though with decreasing influence) well into Roman times, when the equivalent Latin
Latin
word was civitas, also meaning "citizenhood", while municipium applied to a non-sovereign local entity
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Court Of Cassation (Greece)
The Supreme Civil and Criminal Court of Greece
Greece
(Greek: Άρειος Πάγος, Areopagus, i.e. the "Stone, or Hill, of Ares") is the supreme court of Greece
Greece
for civil and criminal law. The Supreme Civil and Criminal Court's decisions are irrevocable. However, Greece
Greece
being a member state of the Council of Europe, cases ruled by the Greek Άρειος Πάγος can still be brought to the European Court of Human Rights. If the Supreme Civil and Criminal Court concludes that a lower court violated the law or the principles of the procedure, then it can order the rehearing of the case by the lower court. It examines only legal and not factual issues and it is the highest degree of judicial resort. The court consists of the president and the attorney-general, ten vice-presidents, sixty five areopagites and seventeen deputy attorneys-general
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Council Of State (Greece)
In Greece, the Council of State (also Council of State; Greek: Συμβούλιο της Επικρατείας) is the Supreme Administrative Court of Greece.Contents1 Organization 2 History 3 Administrative competence 4 Litigation4.1 Acts of government 4.2 Procedure5 International relations 6 Presidents 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksOrganization[edit] The Council is headed by its president, who is chosen from among the members of the Council by the Cabinet of Greece
Greece
for a term of four years
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Neoclassicism
Neoclassicism
Neoclassicism
(from Greek νέος nèos, "new" and Latin
Latin
classicus, "of the highest rank")[1] is the name given to Western movements in the decorative and visual arts, literature, theatre, music, and architecture that draw inspiration from the "classical" art and culture of classical antiquity. Neoclassicism
Neoclassicism
was born in Rome
Rome
in the mid-18th century, at the time of the rediscovery of Pompeii
Pompeii
and Herculaneum, but its popularity spread all over Europe as a generation of European art students finished their Grand Tour
Grand Tour
and returned from Italy to their home countries with newly rediscovered Greco-Roman ideals.[2][3] The main Neoclassical movement coincided with the 18th-century Age of Enlightenment, and continued into the early 19th century, laterally competing with Romanticism
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Renaissance Revival
Renaissance
Renaissance
Revival (sometimes referred to as "Neo-Renaissance") is an all-encompassing designation that covers many 19th century architectural revival styles which were neither Grecian (see Greek Revival) nor Gothic (see Gothic Revival) but which instead drew inspiration from a wide range of classicizing Italian modes. Under the broad designation " Renaissance
Renaissance
architecture" nineteenth-century architects and critics went beyond the architectural style which began in Florence
Florence
and central Italy in the early 15th century as an expression of Humanism; they also included styles we would identify as Mannerist or Baroque
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