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Nuclear Warfare
Nuclear warfare
Nuclear warfare
(sometimes atomic warfare or thermonuclear warfare) is a military conflict or political strategy in which nuclear weaponry is used to inflict damage on the enemy. Nuclear weapons are weapons of mass destruction; in contrast to conventional warfare, nuclear warfare can produce destruction in a much shorter time and can have a long-lasting radiological warfare result
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Nuclear War (other)
A Nuclear War is a war in which nuclear weapons are used. Nuclear War may also refer to:Nuclear War (card game) Nuclear War (video game) Nuclear War MUD, a text-based online role-playing game Nuclear War, an album by Sun Ra, and its title track Nuclear War, an EP by Yo La Tengo "Nuclear War (On the Dance Floor)", a song by Electric Six from FireThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Nuclear War. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the
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Atomic Wars
"Origins" is one of the longest Judge Dredd storylines to run in the pages of British comic 2000 AD. Making extensive use of flashbacks, it tells the story of how the Judges of Mega-City One rose to power. It was written by John Wagner and illustrated by Carlos Ezquerra, who between them created Judge Dredd in 1977. The story ran to 23 episodes, and was published from 2006 to 2007 to mark thirty years of the Judge Dredd strip
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Tactical Objective
A tactical objective is the immediate short-term desired result of a given activity, task, or mission. Tactical objectives are usually entrusted to the lower positioned management in a three-tier organisation's structure of field or front desk, middle and executive management. While historically the term had been applied to military operations, in the 20th century, it has been increasingly applied in the fields of public safety, such as policing, and fire-fighting, commerce, trade planning, political, and international relations policy. A tactical objective is often an intermediate step to achieving an operational objective, and, as such, requires decision making and problem solving skills applied during the execution of the tactical plan as part of the operational plan. Tactical objectives in the commercial use represent performance targets established by the middle management for achieving specific organisational outcomes
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Morale
Morale, also known as esprit de corps (French pronunciation: ​[ɛspʀi də kɔʀ]), is the capacity of a group's members to maintain belief in an institution or goal, particularly in the face of opposition or hardship. Morale is often referenced by authority figures as a generic value judgment of the willpower, obedience, and self-discipline of a group tasked with performing duties assigned by a superior. According to Alexander H. Leighton, "morale is the capacity of a group of people to pull together persistently and consistently in pursuit of a common purpose".[1] Morale is important in the military, because it improves unit cohesion. Without good morale, a force will be more likely to give up or surrender. Morale is usually assessed at a collective, rather than an individual level. In wartime, civilian morale is also important
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Defensive Fighting Position
A defensive fighting position (DFP) is a type of earthwork constructed in a military context, generally large enough to accommodate anything from one man to a small number of soldiers.Contents1 Terminology 2 History2.1 Tobruk3 Modern designs 4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksTerminology[edit] Tobruk
Tobruk
type positions are named after the system of defensive positions constructed, initially, by the Italian Army at Tobruk, Libya. After Tobruk
Tobruk
fell to the Allies in January 1941, the existing positions were modified and significantly expanded by the Australian Army which, along with other Allied forces, reused them in the Siege of Tobruk. A foxhole is one type of defensive strategic position
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Cover (military)
In military combat, the concept of cover refers to anything which is capable of physically protecting an individual from enemy fire. This differentiates it from the similar concept of concealment, in that an object or area of concealment only affords the benefit of stealth, not actual protection from small arms fire or artillery fragments. An example of "cover vs. concealment" would be sandbags vs. tall grass. Cover may be a naturally occurring feature, such as a rock or a tree stump, or it may be a constructed feature, such as a foxhole or a trench. Uniform[edit] In some military services (especially in the United States), a uniform's hat is sometimes referred to officially as a cover, as in "Hey soldier, remove your cover!" or "You're not in uniform without your cover." It is a convention in the U.S
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Counterattack
A counterattack is a tactic employed in response to an attack, with the term originating in "war games".[1] The general objective is to negate or thwart the advantage gained by the enemy during attack, while the specific objectives typically seek to regain lost ground or destroy the attacking enemy (this may take the form of an opposing sports team or military units).[1][2][3] A saying, attributed to Napoleon
Napoleon
Bonaparte illustrate the tactical importance of the counterattack : "the greatest danger occurs at the moment of victory". In the same spirit, in his Battle Studies, Ardant du Pic noticed that "he, general or mere captain, who employs every one in the storming of a position can be sure of seeing it retaken by an organised counter-attack of four men and a corporal".[4] A counterattack is a military tactic that occurs when one side successfully defends off the enemy’s attack and begins to push the enemy back with an attack of its own
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Charge (warfare)
A charge is a maneuver in battle in which combatants advance towards their enemy at their best speed in an attempt to engage in close combat. The charge is the dominant shock attack and has been the key tactic and decisive moment of many battles throughout history
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Air Combat Manoeuvring
Air combat manoeuvring
Air combat manoeuvring
(also known as ACM or dogfighting) is the tactical art of moving, turning and/or situating one's fighter aircraft in order to attain a position from which an attack can be made on another aircraft. Air combat manoeuvres rely on offensive and defensive basic fighter manoeuvring (BFM) to gain an advantage over an aerial opponent.Contents1 Historical overview 2 Tactics 3 Example manoeuvring 4 See also 5 Further reading 6 References 7 External linksHistorical overview[edit] Military aviation appeared in World War I
World War I
where aircraft were initially used to spot enemy troop concentrations, field gun positions and movements. Early aerial combat consisted of aviators shooting at one another with hand held weapons.[1] The first recorded aircraft to be shot down by another aircraft, which occurred on October 5, 1914, was a German Aviatik
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Cyberweapon
A cyberweapon is a malware agent employed for military, paramilitary, or intelligence objectives.[citation needed]Contents1 General characteristics1.1 Sponsor 1.2 Objectives 1.3 Target 1.4 Distinctions from viruses and other malware2 Probable cyberweapons 3 Control and disarmament 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksGeneral characteristics[edit] Requirements for the term vary widely; the most common criteria seem to be for a malware agent which:Is sponsored or employed by a state or non-state actor. Meets an objective which would otherwise require espionage or the use of force. Is employed against specific targets.Sponsor[edit] Part of the distinction from other malware is that the agent is sponsored—that is, commissioned, developed, and/or actually used—not by a black-hat hacker or organized criminal group, but instead by a state or a non-state actor, the latter potentially including terrorist groups and other entities proposed
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Operational Manoeuvre Group
The Operational manoeuvre group (OMG) was a Soviet Army
Soviet Army
organisational maneuver warfare concept created during the early 1950s to replace the Cavalry mechanized group which performed the deep operations on the Eastern Front during the Second World War. The deep operations theory developed in cooperation between the Red Army and Wehrmacht theorists in the 1930s later influenced the Blitzkrieg
Blitzkrieg
operations and echelon-based doctrine. In the Soviet Army
Soviet Army
doctrine the Operational Manoeuvre Groups would be inserted to exploit a breakthrough by a Front during a potential war against NATO
NATO
in Europe
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Fourth-generation Warfare
Fourth-generation warfare
Fourth-generation warfare
(4GW) is conflict characterized by a blurring of the lines between war and politics, combatants and civilians. The term was first used in 1989 by a team of United States
United States
analysts, including paleoconservative William S. Lind, to describe warfare's return to a decentralized form
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Military History
Military history
Military history
is a humanities discipline within the scope of general historical recording of armed conflict in the history of humanity, and its impact on the societies, their cultures, economies and changing local and international relationships. Professional historians normally focus on military affairs that had a major impact on the societies involved as well as the aftermath of conflicts, while amateur historians and hobbyists often take a larger interest in the details of battles, equipment and uniforms in use. The essential subjects of military history study are the causes of war, the social and cultural foundations, military doctrine on each side, the logistics, leadership, technology, strategy, and tactics used, and how these changed over time
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Battle
A battle is a combat in warfare between two or more armed forces, or combatants. A war sometimes consists of many battles. Battles generally are well defined in duration, area, and force commitment.[1] A battle with only limited engagement between the forces and without decisive results is sometimes called a skirmish. Wars and military campaigns are guided by strategy, whereas battles take place on a level of planning and execution known as operational mobility.[2] German strategist Carl von Clausewitz
Carl von Clausewitz
stated that "the employment of battles ..
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Cavalry Tactics
For much of history, humans have used some form of cavalry for war and, as a result, cavalry tactics have evolved over time. Tactically, the main advantages of cavalry over infantry troops were greater mobility, a larger impact, and a higher position.Contents1 Predecessors 2 Riding and fighting on horseback2.1 Tactics of light and medium cavalry using bows 2.2 Tactics of heavy cavalry using lances 2.3 Tactics of heavy cavalry using ranged weapons 2.4 Infantry
Infantry
countertactics 2.5 New tactics of light cavalry and mounted infantry3 Cavalry
Cavalry
in modern warfare 4 War
War
elephants 5 Dromedary and camel cavalry 6 References 7 External linksPredecessors[edit] Chariot tactics
Chariot tactics
had been the basis for using the horse in war.[citation needed] The chariot's advantage of speed was outdone by the agility of riding on horseback
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