HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Novel
A novel is a relatively long work of narrative fiction, normally in prose, which is typically published as a book. The genre has been described as having "a continuous and comprehensive history of about two thousand years,"[1] with its origins in classical Greece and Rome, in medieval and early modern romance, and in the tradition of the novella. The latter, an Italian word for a short story to distinguish it from a novel, has been used in English since the 18th century for a work that falls somewhere in between. Ian Watt, in The Rise of the Novel, suggested in 1957 that the novel first came into being in the early 18th century. Miguel de Cervantes
Miguel de Cervantes
author of Don Quixote
Don Quixote
(the first part of which was published in 1605), is frequently cited as the first significant European novelist of the modern era.[2] The romance is a closely related long prose narrative
[...More...]

"Novel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Classical Greece
Classical Greece
Greece
was a period of around 200 years (5th and 4th centuries BC) in Greek culture.[1] This Classical period saw the annexation of much of modern-day Greece
Greece
by the Persian Empire[2] and its subsequent independence. Classical Greece
Greece
had a powerful influence on the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and on the foundations of western civilization. Much of modern Western politics, artistic thought (architecture, sculpture), scientific thought, theatre, literature, and philosophy derives from this period of Greek history. In the context of the art, architecture, and culture of Ancient Greece, the Classical period[3] corresponds to most of the 5th and 4th centuries BC (the most common dates being the fall of the last Athenian
Athenian
tyrant in 510 BC and the death of Alexander the Great
Alexander the Great
in 323 BC)
[...More...]

"Classical Greece" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Media (communication)
Media are the collective communication outlets or tools used to store and deliver information or data.[1][2] It is either associated with communication media, or the specialized mass media communication businesses such as print media and the press, photography, advertising, cinema, broadcasting (radio and television), publishing[3] and point of sale.Contents1 Origin and definition 2 Electronic media 3 Social impact 4 Games as a medium for communication 5 See also 6 References 7 Further readingOrigin and definition[edit] The term media is defined as "one of the means or channels of general communication in society, as newspapers, radio, television etc.."[4] The beginning of human communication through designed channels, i.e. not vocalization or gestures, dates back to ancient cave paintings, drawn maps, and writing. The Persian Empire (centred on present-day Iran) played an important role in the field of communication
[...More...]

"Media (communication)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Classical Rome
Classical may refer to:Contents1 European antiquity 2 Music and arts 3 Language 4 Science and mathematics 5 Other uses 6 See alsoEuropean antiquity[edit] Classical antiquity, a period of history from roughly the 7th or 8th century B.C.E. to the 5th century C.E
[...More...]

"Classical Rome" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Critical Theory
Critical Theory is a school of thought that stresses the reflective assessment and critique of society and culture by applying knowledge from the social sciences and the humanities. As a term, Critical Theory has two meanings with different origins and histories: the first originated in sociology and the second originated in literary criticism, whereby it is used and applied as an umbrella term that can describe a theory founded upon critique; thus, the theorist Max Horkheimer described a theory as critical insofar as it seeks "to liberate human beings from the circumstances that enslave them".[1] In sociology and political philosophy, the term Critical Theory describes the neo- Marxist philosophy
Marxist philosophy
of the Frankfurt School, which was developed in Germany in the 1930s
[...More...]

"Critical Theory" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Medieval
In the history of Europe, the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
(or Medieval Period) lasted from the 5th to the 15th century. It began with the fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and merged into the Renaissance
Renaissance
and the Age of Discovery. The Middle Ages
Middle Ages
is the middle period of the three traditional divisions of Western history: classical antiquity, the medieval period, and the modern period. The medieval period is itself subdivided into the Early, High, and Late Middle Ages. Population decline, counterurbanisation, invasion, and movement of peoples, which had begun in Late Antiquity, continued in the Early Middle Ages. The large-scale movements of the Migration Period, including various Germanic peoples, formed new kingdoms in what remained of the Western Roman Empire
[...More...]

"Medieval" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Performance
Performance
Performance
is completion of a task with application of knowledge, skills and abilities.[1] In work place, performance or job performance means good ranking with the hypothesized conception of requirements of a task role, whereas citizenship performance means a set of individual activity/contribution (prosocial organizational behavior) that supports the organizational culture.[2][3] In the performing arts, a performance generally comprises an event in which a performer or group of performers present one or more works of art to an audience. Usually the performers participate in rehearsals beforehand. An effective performance is determined by competency of the performer - level of skill and knowledge
[...More...]

"Performance" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Modern Era
Modern history, the modern period or the modern era, is the linear, global, historiographical approach to the time frame after post-classical history.[1][2] This view stands in contrast to the "organic," or non-linear, view of history first put forward by the renowned philosopher and historian, Oswald Spengler, early in the 20th century.[3] Modern history
Modern history
can be further broken down into periods :The early modern period began approximately in the early 16th century; notable historical milestones included the European Renaissance, the Age of Discovery, and the Protestant Reformation.[4][5] The late modern period began approximately in the mid-18th century; notable historical milestones included the French Revolution, the American Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, the Great Divergence, and the Russian Revolution
[...More...]

"Modern Era" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Modern History
Modern history, the modern period or the modern era, is the linear, global, historiographical approach to the time frame after post-classical history.[1][2] This view stands in contrast to the "organic," or non-linear, view of history first put forward by the renowned philosopher and historian, Oswald Spengler, early in the 20th century.[3] Modern history
Modern history
can be further broken down into periods :The early modern period began approximately in the early 16th century; notable historical milestones included the European Renaissance, the Age of Discovery, and the Protestant Reformation.[4][5] The late modern period began approximately in the mid-18th century; notable historical milestones included the French Revolution, the American Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, the Great Divergence, and the Russian Revolution
[...More...]

"Modern History" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Epic Poetry
An epic poem, epic, epos, or epopee is a lengthy narrative poem, ordinarily concerning a serious subject containing details of heroic deeds and events significant to a culture or nation.[1] The ancient Indian Mahabharata
Mahabharata
is the longest epic written[2][3]. The Mahabharat is comprised of 100,000 śloka or over 200,000 verse lines (each shloka is a couplet), as well as long prose passages. At about 1.8 million words in total, the Mahābhārata is roughly ten times the length of the Iliad
Iliad
and the Odyssey
Odyssey
combined, or about four times the length of the Rāmāyaṇa[4]. Another type of epic poetry is epyllion (plural: epyllia), which is a brief narrative poem with a romantic or mythological theme. The term, which means "little epic", came into use in the nineteenth century
[...More...]

"Epic Poetry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Literary Nonsense
Literary nonsense
Literary nonsense
(or nonsense literature) is a broad categorization of literature that balances elements that make sense with some that do not, with the effect of subverting language conventions or logical reasoning.[1] Even though the most well-known form of literary nonsense is nonsense verse, the genre is present in many forms of literature. The effect of nonsense is often caused by an excess of meaning, rather than a lack of it. Its humor is derived from its nonsensical nature, rather than wit or the "joke" of a punchline.[2]Contents1 History 2 Theory 3 Distinction 4 Audience 5 Nonsense writers 6 Popular culture 7 See also 8 Notes 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksHistory[edit]John Tenniel's depiction of the nonsense creatures in Carroll's Jabberwocky.Literary nonsense, as recognized since the nineteenth century, comes from a combination of two broad artistic sources
[...More...]

"Literary Nonsense" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lyric Poetry
Lyric poetry
Lyric poetry
is a formal type of poetry which expresses personal emotions or feelings, typically spoken in the first person.[1] The term derives from a form of Ancient Greek literature, the lyric, which was defined by its musical accompaniment, usually on a stringed instrument known as a lyre.[2] The term owes its importance in literary theory to the division developed by Aristotle
Aristotle
between three broad categories of poetry: lyrical, dramatic, and epic.Contents1 Meters 2 History2.1 Antiquity2.1.1 Greece 2.1.2 Rome 2.1.3 China2.2 Medieval verse 2.3 16th century 2.4 17th century 2.5 18th century 2.6 19th century 2.7 20th century3 References 4 Further readingMeters[edit] Much lyric poetry depends on regular meter based either on number of syllables or on stress
[...More...]

"Lyric Poetry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Outline Of Literature
The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to literature: Literature
Literature
– prose, written or oral, including fiction and non-fiction, drama, and poetry
[...More...]

"Outline Of Literature" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

List Of Poetry Awards
This is a list of awards that are, or have been, given out to writers of poetry, either for a specific poem, collection of poems, or body of work. This is not intended to be an all-inclusive list of poetry awards; rather, it is a list of those awards which have entries on.Contents1 Major international awards 2 Asia 3 Africa 4 Australia 5 Austria 6 Canada 7 Chile7.1 Governor General's Awards8 Croatia 9 Germany 10 India 11 Ireland 12 Korea 13 New Zealand 14 Slovenia 15 Spanish (language) 16 United Kingdom 17 United States17.1 Awards given by the Academy of American Poets 17.2 Awards given by the Poetry
[...More...]

"List Of Poetry Awards" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Literary Magazine
A literary magazine is a periodical devoted to literature in a broad sense. Literary magazines usually publish short stories, poetry, and essays, along with literary criticism, book reviews, biographical profiles of authors, interviews and letters. Literary magazines are often called literary journals, or little magazines, terms intended to contrast them with larger, commercial magazines.[1]Contents1 History 2 Online literary magazines 3 Little magazines 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksHistory[edit] Nouvelles de la république des lettres is regarded as the first literary magazine; it was established by Pierre Bayle
Pierre Bayle
in France
France
in 1684.[2] Literary magazines became common in the early part of the 19th century, mirroring an overall rise in the number of books, magazines, and scholarly journals being published at that time
[...More...]

"Literary Magazine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tragedy
Tragedy
Tragedy
(from the Greek: τραγῳδία, tragōidia[a]) is a form of drama based on human suffering that invokes an accompanying catharsis or pleasure in audiences.[2][3] While many cultures have developed forms that provoke this paradoxical response, the term tragedy often refers to a specific tradition of drama that has played a unique and important role historically in the self-definition of Western civilisation.[2][4] That tradition has been multiple and discontinuous, yet the term has often been used to invoke a powerful effect of cultural identity and historical continuity—"the Greeks and the Elizabethans, in one cultural form; Hel
[...More...]

"Tragedy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.