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Novantae
The Novantae
Novantae
were a people of the late 2nd century who lived in what is now Galloway
Galloway
and Carrick, in southwestern-most Scotland. They are mentioned briefly in Ptolemy's Geography (written c. 150), and there is no other historical record of them
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Novant Health
Novant Health is a four-state integrated network of physician clinics, outpatient centers and hospitals. The Novant Health network consists of more than 1,500 physicians and 26,000 employees at more than 500 locations, including 15 medical centers and hundreds of outpatient facilities and physician clinics.[1] Headquartered in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, Novant Health serves more than 4 million patients annually.[2] In 2014, Novant Health provided more than $639 million in community benefit, including charity care and services.[citation needed] The organization was formed on July 1, 1997 by the merger of Carolina Medicorp of Winston-Salem, North Carolina and Presbyterian Health Services of Charlotte, North Carolina. [3] Novant Health's new system-wide brand launched April 17, 2013. The new logo color aubergine represented "excellence" and "warmth."[4]Contents1 History1.1 Mergers and Re-branding 1.2 Reorganization and Layoffs 1.3 St
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Trimontium (newstead)
Trimontium is the name of a Roman fort
Roman fort
at Newstead, near Melrose, Scottish Borders, Scotland, close under the three Eildon Hills
Eildon Hills
(whence the name trium montium). It was an advance post of the Romans in the Roman province of Valentia. The fort was identified by Ptolemy
Ptolemy
in his Geography.[1] Trimontium was occupied by the Romans intermittently from 80 to 211. The fort was likely abandoned from c. 100-105 AD until c. 140 AD.[2] At the height of the Roman occupation of the fort, no more than 1500 soldiers and a smaller civilian population lived in the settlement.[3]Contents1 Fort 2 Site archaeology 3 Museums 4 In fiction 5 References5.1 Footnotes6 External linksFort[edit] The fort was laid out as a standard Roman fort. It has three layers of defences, the first being the central fort itself with its earthen defences built during the 1st century
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Rheged
Rheged
Rheged
(Welsh pronunciation: [ˈr̥ɛɡɛd]) was one of the kingdoms of the Hen Ogledd
Hen Ogledd
("Old North"), the Brittonic-speaking region of what is now Northern England
Northern England
and southern Scotland, during the post-Roman era and Early Middle Ages. It is recorded in several poetic and bardic sources, although its borders are not described in any of them
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Gododdin
The Gododdin
Gododdin
(Welsh pronunciation: [ɡoˈdoðin]) were a P-Celtic speaking Brittonic people of north-eastern Britannia, the area known as the Hen Ogledd
Hen Ogledd
or Old North (modern south-east Scotland
Scotland
and north-east England), in the sub-Roman period
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Y Gododdin
Y Gododdin
Gododdin
(Welsh: [ə ɡɔˈdɔðɪn]) is a medieval Welsh poem consisting of a series of elegies to the men of the Brittonic kingdom of Gododdin
Gododdin
and its allies who, according to the conventional interpretation, died fighting the Angles
Angles
of Deira
Deira
and Bernicia
Bernicia
at a place named Catraeth in c. AD 600. It is traditionally ascribed to the bard Aneirin and survives only in one manuscript, the Book of Aneirin. The Book of Aneirin
Book of Aneirin
manuscript is from the later 13th century, but Y Gododdin
Gododdin
has been dated to anywhere between the 7th and the early 11th centuries. The text is partly written in Middle Welsh orthography and partly in Old Welsh
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Aneirin
Aneirin [aˈnɛirɪn] or Neirin was an early Medieval Brythonic poet. He is believed to have been a bard or court poet in one of the Cumbric kingdoms of the Hen Ogledd, probably that of Gododdin
Gododdin
at Edinburgh, in modern Scotland. From the 17th century, his name was often incorrectly spelled "Aneurin".Contents1 Life 2 Reputation 3 Poetry 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksLife[edit] Some records indicate that Aneirin was the son of Caunus (or Caw) and brother to Gildas.[1] According to this version of his life, he was born at Dumbarton
Dumbarton
on the River Clyde. However, some scholars debate this parentage, and contend that these records are of later invention and are erroneous. Whoever his father was, Aneirin's mother, Dwywei is mentioned in Y Gododdin
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Battle Of Catraeth
At least 300 nobles Unknown number of infantry Unknown, but far superior in numberCasualties and lossesHeavy Unknownv t eAnglo-Saxon invasions and the founding of EnglandTimelineGuoloph Aylesford Treachery of the Long Knives Wippedesfleot Mercredesburne Badon Beranburh Alclud Ford Argoed Llwyfain Deorham 1st Wodensburh Raith Catraeth Degsastan Chester Cirencester Cefn Digoll Caer-Uisc Hatfield Chase Heavenfield Maserfield Winwaed Peonnum Two Rivers Trent Nechtansmere 2nd Wodensburh Hehil Pencon Hereford Otford Bensington Ellandun Hingston Down BrunanburhThe Battle of Catraeth was fought around AD 600 between a force raised by the Gododdin, a Brythonic people of the Hen Ogledd
Hen Ogledd
or "Old North" of Britain, and the Angles
Angles
of Bernicia
Bernicia
and Deira
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Angles
The Angles
Angles
(Latin: Angli) were one of the main Germanic peoples
Germanic peoples
who settled in Great Britain
Great Britain
in the post-Roman period. They founded several of the kingdoms of Anglo- Saxon
Saxon
England, and their name is the root of the name England. The name comes from Anglia (Angeln), a peninsula located on the Baltic shore of what is now Schleswig-Holstein.Contents1 Name 2 Greco-Roman historiography2.1 Tacitus 2.2 Ptolemy3 Medieval historiography 4 Archaeology 5 Anglian kingdoms in England 6 See also 7 Notes 8 References 9 Further readingName[edit] The name of the Angles
Angles
may have been first recorded in Latinised form, as Anglii, in the Germania
Germania
of Tacitus
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Bernicia
Bernicia
Bernicia
(Old English: Bernice, Bryneich, Beornice; Latin: Bernicia) was an Anglo-Saxon kingdom established by Anglian settlers of the 6th century in what is now southeastern Scotland
Scotland
and North East England. The Anglian territory of Bernicia
Bernicia
was approximately equivalent to the modern English counties of Northumberland
Northumberland
and Durham, and the Scottish counties of Berwickshire
Berwickshire
and East Lothian, stretching from the Forth to the Tees
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William Roy
Major-General
Major-General
William Roy
William Roy
FRS, AS (4 May 1726 – 1 July 1790) was a Scottish military engineer, surveyor, and antiquarian. He was an innovator who applied new scientific discoveries and newly emerging technologies to the accurate geodetic mapping of Great Britain. It was Roy's advocacy and leadership that led to the creation of the Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
in 1791, the year after his death. His technical work in the establishment of a surveying baseline won him the Copley Medal in 1785. His maps and drawings of Roman archaeological sites in Scotland
Scotland
were the first accurate and systematic study of the subject, and have not been improved upon even today
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Newstead, Scottish Borders
Newstead is a village in the Scottish Borders, about 1.3 miles (2.1 km) east of Melrose. It has a population of approximately 260, according to the 2001 census.Contents1 Location and history 2 Places of interest 3 Notable residents 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksLocation and history[edit] It is situated in the valley of the River Tweed, at a crossing point for the Roman Dere Street. Newstead was of great strategic importance throughout history. This was principally due to the proximity of the prominent Eildon Hill. Former inhabitants include: the ancient Selgovae; the Roman army at Trimontium (Newstead); monks and masons, builders of nearby Melrose Abbey
Melrose Abbey
and, more recently, navvies working on the impressive railway viaduct at Leaderfoot. It is reputedly the oldest continually-inhabited settlement in Scotland
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Tacitus
Publius (or Gaius) Cornelius Tacitus
Tacitus
(/ˈtæsɪtəs/; Classical Latin: [ˈtakɪtʊs]; c. 56 – c. 120 AD) was a senator and a historian of the Roman Empire. The surviving portions of his two major works—the Annals and the Histories—examine the reigns of the Roman emperors Tiberius, Claudius, Nero, and those who reigned in the Year of the Four Emperors
Year of the Four Emperors
(69 AD). These two works span the history of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
from the death of Augustus, in 14 AD, to the years of the First Jewish–Roman War, in 70 AD
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De Situ Britanniae
The Description of Britain, also known by its Latin
Latin
name De Situ Britanniae ("On the Situation of Britain"), was a literary forgery perpetrated by Charles Bertram
Charles Bertram
on the historians of England. It purported to be a 15th-century manuscript by the English monk Richard of Westminster, including information from a lost contemporary account of Britain by a Roman general (dux), new details of the Roman roads in Britain in the style of the Antonine Itinerary, and "an antient map" as detailed as (but improved upon) the works of Ptolemy. Bertram disclosed the existence of the work through his correspondence with the antiquarian William Stukeley
William Stukeley
by 1748, provided him "a copy" which was made available in London
London
by 1749, and published it in Latin
Latin
in 1757
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William Forbes Skene
William Forbes Skene
William Forbes Skene
(7 June 1809 – 29 August 1892), was a Scottish historian and antiquary.Contents1 Life 2 See also 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksLife[edit] He was the second son of Sir Walter Scott's friend, James Skene (1775–1864), of Rubislaw, near Aberdeen. He was educated at Edinburgh Academy
Edinburgh Academy
in Edinburgh
Edinburgh
and at the University of St Andrews, taking an especial interest in the study of Celtic philology and literature. In 1832, he became a Writer to the Signet (WS), and shortly afterwards obtained an official appointment in the bill department of the Court of Session, which he held until 1865
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John Rhys
Sir John Rhys, PC, FBA (also spelled Rhŷs;[1] 21 June 1840 – 17 December 1915) was a Welsh scholar, fellow of the British Academy, Celticist and the first Professor of Celtic at Oxford University.[2]Contents1 Early years and education 2 Career 3 Awards 4 Bibliography 5 References 6 External linksEarly years and education[edit] He was born John Rees at Ponterwyd
Ponterwyd
in Ceredigion, to a lead miner and farmer, Hugh Rees, and his wife. Rhys was educated at schools in Pantyffynnon
Pantyffynnon
and Ponterwyd
Ponterwyd
before moving to the British School, a recently opened institution at Penllwyn, in 1855. Here Rhys was enrolled as a pupil and teacher, and after leaving studied at Bangor Normal College from 1860 to 1861. Upon leaving Bangor Normal College, Rhys gained employment as headmaster at Rhos-y-bol, Anglesey
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