HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

North Rhine-Westphalia
North Rhine- Westphalia
Westphalia
(German: Nordrhein-Westfalen, pronounced [ˈnɔʁtʁaɪ̯n vɛstˈfaːlən] ( listen), commonly shortened to NRW) is the most populous state of Germany, with a population of approximately 18 million, and the fourth largest by area. Its capital is Düsseldorf; the largest city is Cologne. Four of Germany's ten largest cities (Cologne, Düsseldorf, Dortmund, and Essen) are located in this state, as well as the second largest metropolitan area on the European continent, Rhine-Ruhr. North Rhine- Westphalia
Westphalia
was founded in 1946 as a merger of the provinces of North Rhine
North Rhine
and Westphalia, both formerly parts of Prussia, and the Free State of Lippe
[...More...]

"North Rhine-Westphalia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ottonian Dynasty
The Ottonian dynasty
Ottonian dynasty
(German: Ottonen) was a Saxon dynasty of German monarchs (919–1024), named after three of its kings and Holy Roman Emperors named Otto, especially its first Emperor Otto I. It is also known as the Saxon dynasty after the family's origin in the German stem duchy of Saxony. The family itself is also sometimes known as the Liudolfings (Liudolfinger), after its earliest known member Count Liudolf (d. 866) and one of its primary leading-names
[...More...]

"Ottonian Dynasty" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

UTC+2
UTC+02:00 is an identifier for a time offset from UTC of +02. In ISO 8601 the associated time would be written as 2018-04-06T10:17:05+02:00
[...More...]

"UTC+2" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ubii
The Ubii
Ubii
were a Germanic tribe[1] first encountered dwelling on the right bank of the Rhine
Rhine
in the time of Julius Caesar, who formed an alliance with them in 55 BC in order to launch attacks across the river. They were transported in 39 BC by Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa
Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa
to the left bank, apparently at their own request, as they feared the incursions of their neighbors, the Chatti.[2] A colony for Roman veterans was founded in 50 AD under the patronage of Agrippa’s granddaughter, Agrippina the Younger,[3] who had been born at Ara Ubiorum, the capital of the Ubii. The colony derived its title from the names of Agrippina and her husband, the emperor Claudius, and received the name Colonia Claudia Ara Augusta Agrippinensium, which is the origin of the city’s modern name, Cologne
[...More...]

"Ubii" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

History Of North Rhine-Westphalia
—George Santayana History
History
(from Greek ἱστορία, historia, meaning "inquiry, knowledge acquired by investigation")[2] is the study of the past as it is described in written documents.[3][4] Events occurring before written record are considered prehistory. It is an umbrella term that relates to past events as well as the memory, discovery, collection, organization, presentation, and interpretation of information about these events
[...More...]

"History Of North Rhine-Westphalia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sugambri
The Sicambri, also known as the Sugambri or Sicambrians, were a Germanic people
Germanic people
who during Roman times lived on the right bank of the Rhine
Rhine
river, in what is now Germany, near the border with the Netherlands. They were first reported by Julius Caesar. Whether or not the Sicambri
Sicambri
spoke a Germanic or Celtic language, or something else, is not certain, because they lived in the so-called Nordwestblock
Nordwestblock
zone where these two language families came into contact and were both influential. By the 3rd century the region, in which they and their neighbours had lived, had become part of the territory of the Franks, which was a new name that possibly represented a new alliance of older tribes, possibly including the Sicambri
[...More...]

"Sugambri" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Cugerni
The Cugerni (or Cuberni or Guberni) was Germanic tribal grouping with a particular territory within the Roman province
Roman province
of Germania
Germania
Inferior, which later became Germania
Germania
Secunda. More precisely they lived near modern Xanten, and the old Castra Vetera, on the Rhine. This part of Germania Secunda
Germania Secunda
was called the Civitas or Colonia Traiana (polity or colony of Trajan), and it was also inhabited by the Betasii.[1][2] The Cugerni are amongst the Germanic tribes who crossed the Rhine
Rhine
from east to west, and were settled in the Roman Empire.[2] Similarly, to their south were the Ubii
Ubii
who also lived on the Rhine, around the modern city of Cologne
Cologne
in their Colonia Agrippenses
[...More...]

"Cugerni" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tencteri
The Tencteri
Tencteri
or Tenchteri or Tenctheri (in Plutarch's Greek, Tenteritē[1] and possibly the same as the Tenkeroi mentioned by Claudius Ptolemy
Claudius Ptolemy
if these were not the Tungri[2]) were an ancient tribe, who moved into the area on the right bank (the northern or eastern bank) of the lower Rhine
Rhine
in the 1st century BC. They are known first from the surviving works of ancient authors such as Julius Caesar and Tacitus
[...More...]

"Tencteri" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Usipetes
Usipetes
Usipetes
or Usipii
Usipii
(in Plutarch's Greek, Ousipai,[1] and possibly the same as the Ouispoi of Claudius Ptolemy[2]) were an ancient tribe who moved into the area on the right bank (the northern or eastern bank) of the lower Rhine
Rhine
in the 1st century BC, putting them in contact with Gaul
Gaul
and the Roman empire. They are known first from the surviving works of ancient authors such as Julius Caesar
Julius Caesar
and Tacitus
[...More...]

"Usipetes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Merovingians
The Merovingians (/ˌmɛroʊˈvɪndʒiən/) were a Salian Frankish dynasty that ruled the Franks
Franks
for nearly 300 years in a region known as Francia
Francia
in Latin, beginning in the middle of the 5th century. Their territory largely corresponded to ancient Gaul
Gaul
as well as the Roman provinces of Raetia, Germania Superior
Germania Superior
and the southern part of Germania. Childeric I
Childeric I
(c
[...More...]

"Merovingians" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Carolingians
Non-agnatic lines:Robertian dynastyHouse of Capet Bosonid dynastyCarolingian dynastyThe Carolingian cross.PippinidsPippin the Elder (c. 580–640) Grimoald (616–656) Childebert the Adopted
Childebert the Adopted
(d. 662)Arnulfings Arnulf of Metz
Arnulf of Metz
(582–640) Ansegisel (d. 662 or 679) Chlodulf of Metz (d. 696 or 697) Pepin of Herstal
Pepin of Herstal
(635-714) Grimoald II (d. 714) Drogo of Champagne
Drogo of Champagne
(670–708) Theudoald (d. 741)Carolingians Charles Martel
Charles Martel
(686–741) Carloman (d
[...More...]

"Carolingians" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Carolingian Empire
The Carolingian Empire
Empire
(800–888) was a large empire in western and central Europe
Europe
during the early Middle Ages. It was ruled by the Carolingian dynasty, which had ruled as kings of the Franks
Franks
since 751 and as kings of the Lombards
Lombards
of Italy
Italy
from 774. In 800, the Frankish king Charlemagne
Charlemagne
was crowned emperor in Rome
Rome
by Pope Leo III in an effort to revive the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the west during a vacancy in the throne of the eastern Roman Empire. After a civil war (840–43) following the death of Emperor Louis the Pious, the empire was divided into autonomous kingdoms, with one king still recognised as emperor, but with little authority outside his own kingdom
[...More...]

"Carolingian Empire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Treaty Of Verdun
The Treaty of Verdun, signed in August 843, was the first of the treaties that divided the Carolingian Empire
Carolingian Empire
into three kingdoms among the three surviving sons of Louis the Pious, who was the son of Charlemagne. The treaty, signed in Verdun-sur-Meuse, ended the three-year Carolingian Civil War.Contents1 Background 2 Provisions 3 Legacy 4 See also 5 Notes 6 External linksBackground[edit] Following Charlemagne's death, Louis was made ruler of the Carolingian empire. During his reign, he divided the empire so that each of his sons could rule over their own kingdom under the greater rule of their father. Lothair I
Lothair I
was given the title of emperor but because of several re-divisions by his father and the resulting revolts, he became much less powerful
[...More...]

"Treaty Of Verdun" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gross Domestic Product
Gross domestic product
Gross domestic product
(GDP) is a monetary measure of the market value of all final goods and services produced in a period (quarterly or yearly) of time. Nominal GDP estimates are commonly used to determine the economic performance of a whole country or region, and to make international comparisons
[...More...]

"Gross Domestic Product" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

ISO 3166
ISO 3166 is a standard published by the International Organization for Standardization
Standardization
(ISO) that defines codes for the names of countries, dependent territories, special areas of geographical interest, and their principal subdivisions (e.g., provinces or states). The official name of the standard is Codes for the representation of names of countries and their subdivisions.Contents1 Parts 2 Editions 3 ISO 3166 Maintenance Agency3.1 Members4 See also 5 References 6 External linksParts[edit] It consists of three parts:[1]ISO 3166-1, Codes for the representation of names of countries and their subdivisions – Part 1: Country
Country
codes, defines codes for the names of countries, dependent territories, and special areas of geographical interest
[...More...]

"ISO 3166" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Central European Summer Time
Central European Summer Time
European Summer Time
(CEST), sometime referred also as Central European Daylight Time (CEDT), is the standard clock time observed during the period of summer daylight-saving in those European countries which observe Central European Time
Central European Time
(UTC+1) during the other part of the year. It corresponds to UTC+2, which makes it the same as Central Africa Time, South African Standard Time
South African Standard Time
and Kaliningrad Time in Russia.Contents1 Names 2 Period of observation 3 Usage 4 See also 5 ReferencesNames[edit] Other names which have been applied to Central European Summer Time are Middle European Summer Time
European Summer Time
(MEST), Central European Daylight Saving Time (CEDT), and Bravo Time (after the second letter of the NATO phonetic alphabet)
[...More...]

"Central European Summer Time" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.