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North Dakota State University
North Dakota
North Dakota
State University of Agriculture
Agriculture
and Applied Sciences, more commonly known as North Dakota
North Dakota
State University (NDSU), is a public research university that sits on a 258-acre campus (~1 km2) in Fargo, North Dakota, U.S. The institution was founded as North Dakota
North Dakota
Agricultural College in 1890 as the research land-grant institution for the state of North Dakota. NDSU is a comprehensive doctoral research university with programs involved in very high research activity.[10] NDSU offers 102 undergraduate majors, 170 undergraduate degree programs, 6 undergraduate certificate programs, 79 undergraduate minors, 81 master’s degree programs, 47 doctoral degree programs of study and 10 graduate certificate programs
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Public University
A public university is a university that is predominantly funded by public means through a national or subnational government, as opposed to private universities
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Casselton, North Dakota
Casselton is a city in Cass County, North Dakota, United States.[1] The population was 2,329 at the 2010 census.[5] making it the twentieth largest city in North Dakota. Casselton was founded in 1876. The city is named in honor of George Washington Cass, a president of the Northern Pacific Railway, which established a station there in 1876 to develop a town for homesteaders. Casselton is the hometown of five North Dakota
North Dakota
governors.Contents1 History1.1 2013 train derailment2 Geography 3 Climate 4 Demographics4.1 2010 census 4.2 2000 census5 Area attractions 6 Transportation 7 Notable people 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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Land-grant University
A land-grant university (also called land-grant college or land-grant institution) is an institution of higher education in the United States designated by a state to receive the benefits of the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890. The Morrill Acts funded educational institutions by granting federally controlled land to the states for them to sell, to raise funds, to establish and endow "land-grant" colleges. The mission of these institutions as set forth in the 1862 Act is to focus on the teaching of practical agriculture, science, military science and engineering (though "without excluding... classical studies"), as a response to the industrial revolution and changing social class.[1][2] This mission was in contrast to the historic practice of higher education to focus on an abstract liberal arts curriculum
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National Register Of Historic Places
The National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
(NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property. The passage of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) in 1966 established the National Register and the process for adding properties to it. Of the more than one million properties on the National Register, 80,000 are listed individually
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Nano Technologies
Nanotechnology
Nanotechnology
("nanotech") is manipulation of matter on an atomic, molecular, and supramolecular scale. The earliest, widespread description of nanotechnology[1][2] referred to the particular technological goal of precisely manipulating atoms and molecules for fabrication of macroscale products, also now referred to as molecular nanotechnology. A more generalized description of nanotechnology was subsequently established by the National Nanotechnology
Nanotechnology
Initiative, which defines nanotechnology as the manipulation of matter with at least one dimension sized from 1 to 100 nanometers
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RFID
Radio-frequency
Radio-frequency
identification (RFID) uses electromagnetic fields to automatically identify and track tags attached to objects. The tags contain electronically-stored information. Passive tags collect energy from a nearby RFID reader's interrogating radio waves. Active tags have a local power source (such as a battery) and may operate hundreds of meters from the RFID reader. Unlike a barcode, the tag need not be within the line of sight of the reader, so it may be embedded in the tracked object
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Polymers
A polymer (/ˈpɒlɪmər/;[2][3] Greek poly-, "many" + -mer, "parts") is a large molecule, or macromolecule, composed of many repeated subunits. Because of their broad range of properties,[4] both synthetic and natural polymers play essential and ubiquitous roles in everyday life.[5] Polymers range from familiar synthetic plastics such as polystyrene to natural biopolymers such as DNA
DNA
and proteins that are fundamental to biological structure and function. Polymers, both natural and synthetic, are created via polymerization of many small molecules, known as monomers
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Coatings
A coating is a covering that is applied to the surface of an object, usually referred to as the substrate. The purpose of applying the coating may be decorative, functional, or both. The coating itself may be an all-over coating, completely covering the substrate, or it may only cover parts of the substrate
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High Performance Computing
A supercomputer is a computer with a high level of performance compared to a general-purpose computer. Performance of a supercomputer is measured in floating-point operations per second (FLOPS) instead of million instructions per second (MIPS)
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Carrington, North Dakota
Carrington is a city in Foster County, North Dakota, United States. It is the county seat of Foster County.[5] The population was 2,065 at the 2010 census.[6] Carrington was founded in 1883. Carrington is home to Dakota Growers Pasta Company, Inc.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Demographics3.1 2010 census 3.2 2000 census4 Local media4.1 Print4.1.1 AM Radio4.2 Television5 Education 6 Transportation6.1 Major roads and streets6.1.1 North and south 6.1.2 East and west7 Notable people 8 Climate 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit] Carrington was platted in 1882 by M. D. Carrington, and named for him.[7] Carrington has been the county seat since 1883.[8] A post office has been in operation at Carrington since 1883.[9] Geography[edit] According to the United States Census
Census
Bureau, the city has a total area of 2.11 square miles (5.46 km2), all of it land.[1] Carrington's zip code is 58421
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Dickinson, North Dakota
Dickinson is a city in Stark County, North Dakota, United States. It is the county seat of Stark County.[6] The population was 17,787 at the 2010 census.[7] The U.S. Census
Census
Bureau estimated 2015 population is 23,765.[8] Since the North Dakota
North Dakota
oil boom the city has become one of the fastest growing cities in the United States
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Doctoral
A doctorate (from Latin
Latin
docere, "to teach") or doctor's degree (from Latin
Latin
doctor, "teacher") or doctoral degree (from the ancient formalism licentia docendi) is an academic degree awarded by universities that is, in most countries, a research degree that qualifies the holder to teach at the university level in the degree's field, or to work in a specific profession. There are a variety of doctoral degrees, with the most common being the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), which is awarded in many different fields, ranging from the humanities to the scientific disciplines. In the United States and some other countries, there are also some types of vocational, technical, or professional degrees that are referred to as doctorates in their home countries, though they are not technically doctoral level as they are not research degrees and no defense of any dissertation or thesis is performed
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Minot, North Dakota
Minot (/ˈmaɪnɒt/ ( listen) MY-not) is a city in and the county seat of Ward County, North Dakota, United States,[5] in the state's north-central region. It is most widely known for the Air Force base located approximately 15 miles (24 km) north of the city. With a population of 40,888 at the 2010 census,[6] Minot is the fourth largest city in the state and a trading center for a large portion of northern North Dakota, southwestern Manitoba, and southeastern Saskatchewan. Founded in 1886 during the construction of the Great Northern Railway, Minot is also known as "Magic City", commemorating its remarkable growth in size over a short time. Minot is the principal city of the Minot micropolitan area, a micropolitan area that covers McHenry, Renville, and Ward counties[7] and had a combined population of 69,540 at the 2010 census
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Streeter, North Dakota
Streeter is a city in Stutsman County, North Dakota, United States. The population was 170 at the 2010 census.[5] Founded in 1905, Streeter celebrated its centennial in July 2005 with a weekend festival.[6] The city is at one end of what is considered the straightest road in America, with the other end being Hickson, North Dakota. The road consists of Highway 30 in the west to Highway 46 in the east.[7]Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Demographics3.1 2010 census 3.2 2000 census4 NotesHistory[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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