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North American F-100 Super Sabre
The North American F-100 Super Sabre
North American F-100 Super Sabre
was an American supersonic jet fighter aircraft that served with the United States Air Force
United States Air Force

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Super Sabre (comics)
Super Sabre (Martin Fletcher) is a fictional character, a mutant in the Marvel Comics Universe. His first appearance was in Uncanny X-Men #215.Contents1 Fictional character biography 2 Powers and abilities 3 References 4 External linksFictional character biography[edit] Martin Fletcher was born in Massachusetts. During World War II, as Super Sabre he fought against the Axis powers which dominated Europe. He fought alongside three other heroes during this time: Stonewall, Crimson Commando, and Yankee Clipper. Following the war Super Sabre along with the Commando and Stonewall continued to fight crime. They even hoped to join the Human Torch in fighting communists, but government officials were concerned that the over enthusiastic heroes would cause a real war. The government requested that the trio retired, which they reluctantly did. Fletcher, Crimson Commando, and Stonewall returned to America
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Berlin Wall
The Berlin
Berlin
Wall (German: Berliner Mauer, pronounced [bɛʁˈliːnɐ ˈmaʊ̯ɐ] ( listen)) was a guarded concrete barrier that physically and ideologically divided Berlin
Berlin
from 1961 to 1989.[1] Constructed by the German Democratic Republic (GDR, East Germany), starting on 13 August 1961, the Wall cut off (by land) West Berlin from virtually all of surrounding East Germany
East Germany
and East Berlin
East Berlin
until government officials opened it in November 1989.[2] Its demolition officially began on 13 June 1990 and finished in 1992.[3] The barrier included guard towers placed along large concrete walls,[4] accompanied by a wide area (later known as the "death strip") that contained anti-vehicle trenches, "fakir beds" and other defenses
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Edwards Air Force Base
Edwards Air Force Base
Edwards Air Force Base
(AFB) (IATA: EDW, ICAO: KEDW, FAA
FAA
LID: EDW) is a United States Air Force
United States Air Force
installation located in Kern County
Kern County
in southern California, about 22 miles (35 km) northeast of Lancaster and 15 miles (24 km) east of Rosamond. It is the home of the Air Force Test Center, Air Force Test Pilot School, and NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center. It is the Air Force Materiel Command center for conducting and supporting research and development of flight, as well as testing and evaluating aerospace systems from concept to combat
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Fighter Aircraft
A fighter aircraft is a military aircraft designed primarily for air-to-air combat against other aircraft,[1] as opposed to bombers and attack aircraft, whose main mission is to attack ground targets. The hallmarks of a fighter are its speed, maneuverability, and small size relative to other combat aircraft. Many fighters have secondary ground-attack capabilities, and some are designed as dual-purpose fighter-bombers; often aircraft that do not fulfill the standard definition are called fighters. This may be for political or national security reasons, for advertising purposes, or other reasons.[2] A fighter's main purpose is to establish air superiority over a battlefield
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Angle Of Attack
In fluid dynamics, angle of attack (AOA, or α displaystyle alpha (Greek letter alpha)) is the angle between a reference line on a body (often the chord line of an airfoil) and the vector representing the relative motion between the body and the fluid through which it is moving.[1] Angle
Angle
of attack is the angle between the body's reference line and the oncoming flow. This article focuses on the most common application, the angle of attack of a wing or airfoil moving through air. In aerodynamics, angle of attack specifies the angle between the chord line of the wing of a fixed-wing aircraft and the vector representing the relative motion between the aircraft and the atmosphere. Since a wing can have twist, a chord line of the whole wing may not be definable, so an alternate reference line is simply defined. Often, the chord line of the root of the wing is chosen as the reference line
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Stall (flight)
In fluid dynamics, a stall is a reduction in the lift coefficient generated by a foil as angle of attack increases.[1] This occurs when the critical angle of attack of the foil is exceeded. The critical angle of attack is typically about 15 degrees, but it may vary significantly depending on the fluid, foil, and Reynolds number. Stalls in fixed-wing flight are often experienced as a sudden reduction in lift as the pilot increases the wing's angle of attack and exceeds its critical angle of attack (which may be due to slowing down below stall speed in level flight). A stall does not mean that the engine(s) have stopped working, or that the aircraft has stopped moving — the effect is the same even in an unpowered glider aircraft
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Lift (force)
A fluid flowing past the surface of a body exerts a force on it. Lift is the component of this force that is perpendicular to the oncoming flow direction.[1] It contrasts with the drag force, which is the component of the force parallel to the flow direction. Lift conventionally acts in an upward direction in order to counter the force of gravity, but it can act in any direction at right angles to the flow. If the surrounding fluid is air, the force is called an aerodynamic force. In water or any other liquid, it is called a hydrodynamic force. Dynamic lift is distinguished from other kinds of lift in fluids. Aerostatic lift or buoyancy, in which an internal fluid is lighter than the surrounding fluid, does not require movement and is used by balloons, blimps, dirigibles, boats, and submarines
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Nuclear Bomb
A nuclear weapon is an explosive device that derives its destructive force from nuclear reactions, either fission (fission bomb) or from a combination of fission and fusion reactions (thermonuclear bomb). Both bomb types release large quantities of energy from relatively small amounts of matter. The first test of a fission ("atomic") bomb released an amount of energy approximately equal to 20,000 tons of TNT (84 TJ). The first thermonuclear ("hydrogen") bomb test released energy approximately equal to 10 million tons of TNT (42 PJ).[1] A thermonuclear weapon weighing little more than 2,400 pounds (1,100 kg) can release energy equal to more than 1.2 million tons of TNT (5.0 PJ).[2] A nuclear device no larger than traditional bombs can devastate an entire city by blast, fire, and radiation
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Southern California Logistics Airport
Southern California Logistics Airport (IATA: VCV, ICAO: KVCV), also known as Victorville Airport, is a public airport located in the city of Victorville in San Bernardino County, California, approximately 20 mi (32 km) north of San Bernardino. Prior to its civil usage, the facility was George Air Force Base, from 1941 to 1992 a United States Air Force flight training facility. The airport is home to Southern California Aviation, a large transitional facility for commercial aircraft.[1] As a logistics airport, it is designed for business, military, and freight use
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Compressor Stall
A compressor stall is a local disruption of the airflow in a gas turbine or turbocharger compressor. It is related to compressor surge, which is a complete disruption of the flow through the compressor. Stalls range in severity from a momentary power drop (occurring so quickly it is barely registered on engine instruments) to a complete loss of compression (surge), requiring a reduction in the fuel flow to the engine. Stall was a common problem on early jet engines with simple aerodynamics and manual or mechanical fuel control units, but has been virtually eliminated by better design and the use of hydromechanical and electronic control systems such as Full Authority Digital Engine Controls
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Mach Number
In fluid dynamics, the Mach number
Mach number
(M or Ma) (/mɑːx/; German: [maχ]) is a dimensionless quantity representing the ratio of flow velocity past a boundary to the local speed of sound.[1][2] M = u c , displaystyle mathrm M = frac u c , where:M is the Mach number, u is the local flow velocity with respect to the boundaries (either internal, such as an object immersed in the flow, or external, like a channel), and c is the speed of sound in the medium.By definition, at Mach 1 the local flow velocity u is equal to the speed of sound
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Toss Bombing
Toss bombing
Toss bombing
(sometimes known as loft bombing, and by the U.S. Air Force as the Low Altitude
Altitude
Bombing
Bombing
System, LABS) is a method of bombing where the attacking aircraft pulls upward when releasing its bomb load, giving the bomb additional time of flight by starting its ballistic path with an upward vector. The purpose of toss bombing is to compensate for the gravity drop of the bomb in flight, and allow an aircraft to bomb a target without flying directly over it
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Directional Stability
Directional stability
Directional stability
is stability of a moving body or vehicle about an axis which is perpendicular to its direction of motion. Stability of a vehicle concerns itself with the tendency of a vehicle to return to its original direction in relation to the oncoming medium (water, air, road surface, etc.) when disturbed (rotated) away from that original direction. If a vehicle is directionally stable, a restoring moment is produced which is in a direction opposite to the rotational disturbance
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Cluster Bomb
A cluster munition is a form of air-dropped or ground-launched explosive weapon that releases or ejects smaller submunitions. Commonly, this is a cluster bomb that ejects explosive bomblets that are designed to kill personnel and destroy vehicles. Other cluster munitions are designed to destroy runways or electric power transmission lines, disperse chemical or biological weapons, or to scatter land mines. Some submunition-based weapons can disperse non-munitions, such as leaflets. Because cluster bombs release many small bomblets over a wide area, they pose risks to civilians both during attacks and afterwards. Unexploded bomblets can kill or maim civilians and/or unintended targets long after a conflict has ended, and are costly to locate and remove. Cluster munitions
Cluster munitions
are prohibited for those nations that ratify the Convention on Cluster Munitions, adopted in Dublin, Ireland in May 2008
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AIM-9 Sidewinder
The AIM-9 Sidewinder
AIM-9 Sidewinder
is a short-range air-to-air missile developed by the United States Navy
United States Navy
at China Lake, California, in the 1950s, and subsequently adopted by the United States
United States
Air Force. Since its entry into service in 1956, the Sidewinder has proved to be an enduring international success, and its latest variants are still standard equipment in most western-aligned air forces.[3] The Soviet K-13, a reverse-engineered copy of the AIM-9, was also widely adopted by a number of nations. The majority of Sidewinder variants utilize infrared homing for guidance; the AIM-9C variant used semi-active radar homing and served as the basis of the AGM-122 Sidearm
AGM-122 Sidearm
anti-radar missile. The Sidewinder is the most widely used missile in the West, with more than 110,000 missiles produced for the U.S
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