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Nordic Council
The Nordic Council
Nordic Council
is the official body for formal inter-parliamentary co-operation between the Nordic countries. Formed in 1952, it has 87 members from Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway
Norway
and Sweden
Sweden
as well as from the autonomous areas of the Faroe Islands, Greenland
Greenland
and the Åland
Åland
Islands. The representatives are members of parliament in their respective country/area and are elected by those parliaments. The Council holds ordinary sessions each year in October/November and usually one extra session per year with a specific theme. [1] In 1971, the Nordic Council
Nordic Council
of Ministers, an intergovernmental forum, was established to complement the Council
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Norse Mythology
Norse mythology
Norse mythology
is the body of myths of the North Germanic peoples, stemming from Norse paganism
Norse paganism
and continuing after the Christianization of Scandinavia, and into the Scandinavian folklore
Scandinavian folklore
of the modern period
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Copenhagen
Copenhagener [3]Time zone CET (UTC+1) • Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2)Postal code 1050–1778, 2100, 2150, 2200, 2300, 2400, 2450, 2500Area code(s) (+45) 3Website www.kk.dkCopenhagen[a] (Danish: København [købm̩ˈhɑwˀn] ( listen); Latin: Hafnia) is the capital and most populous city of Denmark. The city has a population of 775,033 (as of January 2018[update]), of whom 613,288 live in the Municipality of Copenhagen.[6][7] Copenhagen
Copenhagen
is situated on the eastern coast of the island of Zealand; another small portion of the city is located on Amager, and is separated from Malmö, Sweden, by the strait of Øresund
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Denmark–Norway
As territory Denmark  ∟  Faroe Islands  ∟  Greenland  Iceland  Norway  Sweden  Estonia  Latvia   United States
United States
(1600–1680)  GermanyAs colonies United States
United States
(1754–)  India  Ghanaa: Frederick VI was regent for his father, so ruled as de facto king from April 14, 1784; he continued to rule Denmark
Denmark
after the Treaty of Kiel until his death on December 3, 1839. b: Denmark
Denmark
(43,094 km2 or 16,639 sq mi), Schleswig-Holstein
Schleswig-Holstein
(15,763 km2 or 6,086 sq mi), Norway (mainland: 324,220 km2 or 125,180 sq mi), Faroes (1,399 km2 or 540 sq mi), Iceland
Iceland
(103,000 km2 or 40,000 sq mi)
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German Language
German (Deutsch [dɔʏtʃ] (listen)) is a West Germanic language that is mainly spoken in Central Europe. It is the most widely spoken and official or co-official language in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, South Tyrol
South Tyrol
in Italy, the German-speaking Community
German-speaking Community
of Belgium, and Liechtenstein. It is also one of the three official languages of Luxembourg
Luxembourg
and a co-official language in the Opole Voivodeship
Opole Voivodeship
in Poland. The languages which are most similar to German are the other members of the West Germanic language branch: Afrikaans, Dutch, English, the Frisian languages, Low German/Low Saxon, Luxembourgish, and Yiddish. There are also strong similarities in vocabulary with Danish, Norwegian and Swedish, although those belong to the North Germanic group
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Martin Kolberg
Martin Kolberg
Martin Kolberg
(born 24 February 1949) is a Norwegian politician for the Labour Party. He served as the party secretary from 2002 until 2009. He was elected to the Parliament of Norway
Norway
in 2009 and since 2013 serves as leader of the Standing Committee on Scrutiny and Constitutional Affairs. Early life and education[edit] Kolberg was born in the city of Drammen, Buskerud. He is the son of railroad worker Kjell O. J. Kolberg (1921-) and homemaker Ruth Utengen (1921-2006). After finishing primary school, Kolberg attended Oslo Technical College, but later dropped out. He since completed training as an electrician. He held a variety of jobs, including mailman, Lab assistant at a cable wire factory and also as assistant at the local shoe-factory. Political career[edit] Kolberg served as a deputy representative in the Norwegian Parliament from 1977 to 1981
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Danish Krone
The krone (Danish pronunciation: [ˈkʁoːnə]; plural: kroner; sign: kr.; code: DKK) is the official currency of Denmark, Greenland and the Faroe Islands, introduced on 1 January 1875.[3] Both the ISO code "DKK" and currency sign "kr." are in common use; the former precedes the value, the latter in some contexts follows it. The currency is sometimes referred to as the Danish crown in English, since krone literally means crown. Historically, krone coins have been minted in Denmark
Denmark
since the 17th century. One krone is subdivided into 100 øre (Danish pronunciation: [ˈøːɐ]; singular and plural), the name øre possibly deriving from Latin aureus meaning "gold coin".[4] Altogether there are eleven denominations of the krone, with the smallest being the 50 øre coin, which is valued at one half of a krone
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Euro
The single currency[1]local namesЕвро (Bulgarian) Eυρώ (Greek) Euró (Hungarian) Eiro (Latvian) Euras (Lithuanian) Ewro (Maltese) Evro (Slovene)Banknotes €5, €10, €20, €50, €100, €200, €500 (until the end of 2018)Coins 1c, 2c, 5c, 10c, 20c, 50c, €1, €2DemographicsOfficial user(s) Eurozone
Eurozone
(19) Austria  Belgium  Cyprus[note 1]  Estonia  Finland  France[note 2]  Germany  Greece  Ireland  Italy[note 3]  Latvia  Lithuania  Luxembourg  Malta  Netherlands[n
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Intergovernmental Organisation
An intergovernmental organization or international governmental organisation (IGO) is an organization composed primarily of sovereign states (referred to as member states), or of other intergovernmental organizations. Intergovernmental organizations are called international organizations, although that term may also include international non-governmental organization such as international nonprofit organizations or multinational corporations. Intergovernmental organizations are an important aspect of public international law. IGOs are established by a treaty that acts as a charter creating the group. Treaties are formed when lawful representatives (governments) of several states go through a ratification process, providing the IGO with an international legal personality. Intergovernmental organizations in a legal sense should be distinguished from simple groupings or coalitions of states, such as the G8 or the Quartet
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Working Language
A working language (also procedural language) is a language that is given a unique legal status in a supranational company, society, state or other body or organization as its primary means of communication. It is primarily the language of the daily correspondence and conversation, since the organization usually has members with various differing language backgrounds. Most international organizations have working languages for their bodies. For a given organization, a working language may or may not also be an official language.[clarification needed]Contents1 United Nations working languages 2 Examples of common international organizations2.1 English and French 2.2 Other groups with one or two working languages 2.3 English, French and Spanish 2.4 Other groups with three or more working languages3 See also 4 ReferencesUnited Nations working languages[edit] Originally English and French were established as working languages at the UN
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Icelandic Króna
The króna (Icelandic pronunciation: ​[ˈkʰrou:na]; plural krónur) (sign: kr; code: ISK) is the currency of Iceland. Iceland
Iceland
is the smallest country to have its own currency and monetary policy.[2][3][4][5] Like the Nordic currencies (such as the Danish krone, Swedish krona and Norwegian krone) that participated in the historical Scandinavian Monetary Union, the name króna (meaning crown) comes from the Latin word corona ("crown"). The name "Icelandic crown" is sometimes used, for example in the financial markets
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Norwegian Krone
The krone [ˈkruːnə] (sign: kr; code: NOK), plural kroner, is the currency of Norway
Norway
and its dependent territories. It is subdivided into 100 øre, which have existed only electronically since 2012. The name translates into English as crown. The krone was the thirteenth most traded currency in the world by value in April 2010, down three positions from 2007.[1]Contents1 History 2 Coins2.1 Use of 10 Syrian pound
Syrian pound
coins in Norway3 Banknotes 4 Summary of denominations issued 5 Exchange rates5.1 Current NOK exchange rates6 Usage 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] A 20-crown gold coin. The text '124 Stk. 1 Kil. f. G.' means that 124 pieces gave one kilogram of pure gold The krone was introduced in 1875, replacing the Norwegian speciedaler/spesidaler at a rate of 4 kroner = 1 speciedaler
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Swedish Krona
The krona (Swedish: [²kruːna]; plural: kronor; sign: kr; code: SEK) has been the currency of Sweden
Sweden
since 1873. Both the ISO code "SEK" and currency sign "kr" are in common use; the former precedes or follows the value, the latter usually follows it but, especially in the past, it sometimes preceded the value. In English, the currency is sometimes referred to as the Swedish crown, as krona literally means crown in Swedish. The Swedish krona
Swedish krona
was the 9th most traded currency in the world by value in April 2016.[3] One krona is subdivided into 100 öre (singular and plural; when referring to the currency unit itself, however, the plural definite form is ören)
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Old Norse
Old Norse
Old Norse
was a North Germanic language that was spoken by inhabitants of Scandinavia
Scandinavia
and their overseas settlements from about the 9th to the 13th centuries. The Proto-Norse language
Proto-Norse language
developed into Old Norse
Old Norse
by the 8th century, and Old Norse
Old Norse
began to develop into the modern North Germanic languages in the mid- to late 14th century, ending the language phase known as Old Norse. These dates, however, are not absolute, since written Old Norse
Old Norse
is found well into the 15th century.[2] Old Norse
Old Norse
was divided into three dialects: Old West Norse, Old East Norse, and Old Gutnish. Old West and East Norse formed a dialect continuum, with no clear geographical boundary between them
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History Of Sweden
During the 11th and 12th centuries, Sweden
Sweden
gradually became a unified Christian kingdom that later included what is today Finland. During the early Middle Ages, the Swedish state also expanded to control Norrland
Norrland
and Finland. Modern Sweden
Sweden
started out of the Kalmar Union formed in 1397 and by the unification of the country by King Gustav Vasa in the 16th century. Vasa fought for an independent Sweden
Sweden
and broke with the papacy, establishing the Lutheran Church in Sweden. In the 17th century Sweden
Sweden
expanded its territories to form the Swedish empire. Most of these conquered territories had to be given up during the 18th century. During the 17th century, after winning wars against Denmark, Russia, and Poland, Sweden
Sweden
emerged as a great power by taking direct control of the Baltic region
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Latvian Language
Latvian (latviešu valoda [ˈlatviɛʃu ˈvaluɔda])[tones?] is a Baltic language
Baltic language
spoken in the Baltic region. It is the language of Latvians
Latvians
and the official language of Latvia
Latvia
as well as one of the official languages of the European Union. It was previously known in English as Lettish, and cognates of the word remain the most commonly used name for the Latvian language
Latvian language
in Germanic languages
Germanic languages
other than English. There are about 1.3 million native Latvian speakers in Latvia and 100,000 abroad
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