HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

Nondenominational Christianity
Nondenominational (or non-denominational) Christianity
Christianity
consists of churches which typically distance themselves from the confessionalism or creedalism of other Christian
Christian
communities[1] by calling themselves non-denominational. Often founded by individual pastors, they have little affiliation with historic denominations, but typically adhere to evangelical Protestantism.[2][3][4] There is no identifiable standard among such congregations. Nondenominational church congregations may establish a functional denomination by means of mutual recognition of or accountability to other congregations and leaders with commonly held doctrine, policy, and worship without formalizing external direction or oversight in such matters. Some nondenominational churches explicitly reject the idea of a formalized denominational structure as a matter of principle, holding that each congregation is better off being autonomous
[...More...]

picture info

Minersville, Pennsylvania
Minersville is a borough in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, United States, located four miles (6 km) west of Pottsville. Anthracite coal deposits are plentiful in the region
[...More...]

picture info

Worship
Worship
Worship
is an act of religious devotion usually directed towards a deity
[...More...]

picture info

Jesus In Christianity
In Christianity, Jesus
Jesus
is believed to be the Messiah
Messiah
(Christ) and through his crucifixion and resurrection, humans can be reconciled to God and thereby are offered salvation and the promise of eternal life.[2] These teachings emphasize that as the willing Lamb of God, Jesus
Jesus
chose to suffer on the cross at Calvary
Calvary
as a sign of his full obedience to the will of God the Father, as an "agent and servant of God".[3][4] The choice Jesus
Jesus
made thus counter-positions him as a new man of morality and obedience, in contrast to Adam's disobedience.[5] Christians believe that Jesus
Jesus
was both human and divine—the Son of God
[...More...]

picture info

Christ (title)
In Christianity, Christ[Notes 1] (Greek Χριστός, Christós, meaning "the anointed one") is a title for the saviour and redeemer who would bring salvation to the Jewish people
Jewish people
and mankind. Christians believe Jesus
Jesus
is the Jewish messiah called Christ in both the Hebrew Bible
Bible
and the Christian
Christian
Old Testament. Christ, used by Christians
Christians
as both a name and a title, is synonymous with Jesus.[5][6][7] The role of the Christ in Christianity
Christianity
originated from the concept of the messiah in Judaism
[...More...]

picture info

Simple Church
The simple church is an Evangelical Christian movement that reinterprets the nature and practice of church.Contents1 Simple 2 Origins and influences 3 Values 4 Practices 5 Media and popular attention 6 Criticism 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksSimple[edit] A simple church may meet anywhere with or without trained leaders, formal liturgy, programs or structures.[1] To facilitate relationship, discipleship (spiritual formation), multiplication, mobility, and member ownership, a simple church is usually a small group of no more than 20-25 persons. Most Church "programs" privately meet during some days of the week and discuss troubles that they are having with their faith, and personal life. Church "programs" are virtually nonexistent and small group participation is essential
[...More...]

picture info

Gallup (company)
Gallup, Inc. is an American analytics and advisory company based in Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
Founded by George Gallup
George Gallup
in 1935, the company became known for its public opinion polls conducted worldwide
[...More...]

Congregational Polity
Congregationalist polity, or Congregational polity, often known as congregationalism, is a system of church governance ("ecclesiastical polity") in which every local church congregation is independent, ecclesiastically sovereign, or "autonomous". Its first articulation in writing is the Cambridge Platform of 1648 in New England. Among those major Protestant Christian traditions that employ congregationalism are those Congregational Churches
Congregational Churches
known by the "Congregationalist" name that descended from the Independent Reformed wing of the Anglo-American Puritan
Puritan
movement of the 17th century, Quakerism, the Baptist churches, and most of the groups brought about by the Anabaptist
Anabaptist
movement in Germany
Germany
that migrated to the U.S. in the late 18th century, as well as the Congregational Methodist
Methodist
Church
[...More...]

picture info

Son Of God (Christianity)
The terms "son of God" and "son of the LORD" are found in several passages of the Old Testament. In Christianity, the title Son of God refers to the status of Jesus
Jesus
as the divine son of God
God
the Father
[...More...]

Policy
A policy is a deliberate system of principles to guide decisions and achieve rational outcomes. A policy is a statement of intent, and is implemented as a procedure or protocol. Policies are generally adopted by a governance body within an organization. Policies can assist in both subjective and objective decision making. Policies to assist in subjective decision making usually assist senior management with decisions that must be based on the relative merits of a number of factors, and as a result are often hard to test objectively, e.g. work-life balance policy. In contrast policies to assist in objective decision making are usually operational in nature and can be objectively tested, e.g. password policy.[1] The term may apply to government, private sector organizations and groups, as well as individuals. Presidential executive orders, corporate privacy policies, and parliamentary rules of order are all examples of policy. Policy differs from rules or law
[...More...]

Confessionalism (religion)
Confessionalism, in a religious (and particularly Christian) sense, is a belief in the importance of full and unambiguous assent to the whole of a religious teaching. Confessionalists believe that differing interpretations or understandings, especially those in direct opposition to a held teaching, cannot be accommodated within a church communion. Confessionalism can become a matter of practical relevance in fields such as Christian education and Christian politics. For example, there is a question over whether Christian schools should attempt to enforce a specific religious doctrine, or whether they should simply teach general "Christian values"
[...More...]

picture info

Creed
A creed (also known as a confession, symbol, or statement of faith) is a statement of the shared beliefs of a religious community in the form of a fixed formula summarizing core tenets. One of the most widely used creeds in Christianity
Christianity
is the Nicene Creed, first formulated in AD 325 at the First Council of Nicaea. It was based on Christian understanding of the Canonical Gospels, the letters of the New Testament
New Testament
and to a lesser extent the Old Testament. Affirmation of this creed, which describes the Trinity, is generally taken as a fundamental test of orthodoxy for most Christian denominations.[1] The Apostles' Creed
Apostles' Creed
is also broadly accepted
[...More...]

Doctrine
Doctrine (from Latin: doctrina) is a codification of beliefs or a body of teachings or instructions, taught principles or positions, as the essence of teachings in a given branch of knowledge or belief system. The Greek analogue is the etymology of catechism.[1] Often doctrine specifically suggests a body of religious principles as it is promulgated by a church, but not necessarily; doctrine is also used to refer to a principle of law, in the common law traditions, established through a history of past decisions, such as the doctrine of self-defense, or the principle of fair use, or the more narrowly applicable first-sale doctrine
[...More...]

picture info

Arminianism
Arminianism
Arminianism
is based on theological ideas of the Dutch Reformed theologian Jacobus Arminius
Jacobus Arminius
(1560–1609) and his historic supporters known as Remonstrants. His teachings held to the five solae of the Reformation, but they were distinct from particular teachings of Martin Luther, Huldrych Zwingli, John Calvin, and other Protestant Reformers. Jacobus Arminius
Jacobus Arminius
(Jakob Harmenszoon) was a student of Theodore Beza
Theodore Beza
(Calvin's successor) at the Theological University of Geneva
[...More...]

picture info

Waldensians
The Waldensians
Waldensians
(also known variously as Waldenses (/wɔːlˈdɛnsiːz, wɒl-/), Vallenses, Valdesi or Vaudois) are a pre- Protestant
Protestant
Christian movement founded by Peter Waldo
Peter Waldo
in Lyon around 1173. In the era of the Reformation, the Waldensians
Waldensians
influenced early Swiss reformer Heinrich Bullinger. Upon finding the ideas of other reformers similar to their own, they quickly merged into the larger Protestant movement, becoming a part of the Calvinist
Calvinist
tradition.[citation needed] The Waldensian movement first appeared in Lyon
Lyon
in the late 1170s[citation needed] and quickly spread to the Cottian Alps
Cottian Alps
between what is today France
France
and Italy
[...More...]

picture info

Plymouth Brethren
The Plymouth Brethren
Plymouth Brethren
are a conservative, low church, nonconformist, evangelical Christian
Christian
movement whose history can be traced to Dublin, Ireland, in the late 1820s, originating from Anglicanism.[1][2] Among other beliefs, the group emphasizes sola scriptura, the belief that the Bible
Bible
is the supreme authority for church doctrine and practice over and above any other source of authority. Plymouth Brethren
Plymouth Brethren
generally see themselves as a network of like-minded independent churches, not as a denomination. They would generally prefer that their gatherings be referred to as "assemblies" rather than "churches" but, in the interests of simplicity, this article uses both terms interchangeably. An influential figure among the early Plymouth Brethren
Plymouth Brethren
was John Nelson Darby (1800–82)
[...More...]