HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Nonbuilding Structure
A nonbuilding structure, also referred to simply as a structure, refers to any body or system of connected parts used to support a load that was not designed for continuous human occupancy
[...More...]

"Nonbuilding Structure" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Eiffel Tower
The Eiffel Tower
Eiffel Tower
(/ˈaɪfəl/ EYE-fəl; French: tour Eiffel [tuʁ‿ɛfɛl] ( listen)) is a wrought iron lattice tower on the Champ de Mars
Champ de Mars
in Paris, France. It is named after the engineer Gustave Eiffel, whose company designed and built the tower. Constructed from 1887–89 as the entrance to the 1889 World's Fair, it was initially criticized by some of France's leading artists and intellectuals for its design, but it has become a global cultural icon of France
France
and one of the most recognisable structures in the world.[3] The Eiffel Tower
Eiffel Tower
is the most-visited paid monument in the world; 6.91 million people ascended it in 2015. The tower is 324 metres (1,063 ft) tall, about the same height as an 81-storey building, and the tallest structure in Paris. Its base is square, measuring 125 metres (410 ft) on each side
[...More...]

"Eiffel Tower" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fortification
Fortifications are military constructions, or buildings, designed for the defense of territories in warfare and also used to solidify rule in a region during peace time. For many thousands of years, humans have constructed defensive works in a variety of increasingly complex designs. The term is derived from the Latin
Latin
fortis ("strong") and facere ("to make"). From very early history to modern times, walls have often been necessary for cities to survive in an ever-changing world of invasion and conquest. Some settlements in the Indus Valley Civilization
Indus Valley Civilization
were the first small cities to be fortified. In ancient Greece, large stone walls had been built in Mycenaean Greece, such as the ancient site of Mycenae
Mycenae
(famous for the huge stone blocks of its 'cyclopean' walls)
[...More...]

"Fortification" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Coke Oven
Coke is a fuel with few impurities and a high carbon content, usually made from coal. It is the solid carbonaceous material derived from destructive distillation of low-ash, low-sulphur bituminous coal. Cokes made from coal are grey, hard, and porous. While coke can be formed naturally, the commonly used form is synthetic. The form known as petroleum coke, or pet coke, is derived from oil refinery coker units or other cracking processes. Coke is used in preparation of producer gas which is a mixture of carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrogen (N2). Producer gas is produced by passing air over red-hot coke
[...More...]

"Coke Oven" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Communications Tower
Radio
Radio
masts and towers are, typically, tall structures designed to support antennas (also known as aerials) for telecommunications and broadcasting, including television. There are two main types: guyed and self-supporting structures
[...More...]

"Communications Tower" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Covered Bridge
A covered bridge is a timber-truss bridge with a roof and siding which, in most covered bridges, create an almost complete enclosure.[1] The purpose of the covering is to protect the wooden structural members from the weather
[...More...]

"Covered Bridge" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Crane (machine)
A crane is a type of machine, generally equipped with a hoist rope, wire ropes or chains, and sheaves, that can be used both to lift and lower materials and to move them horizontally. It is mainly used for lifting heavy things and transporting them to other places. The device uses one or more simple machines to create mechanical advantage and thus move loads beyond the normal capability of a human. Cranes are commonly employed in the transport industry for the loading and unloading of freight, in the construction industry for the movement of materials, and in the manufacturing industry for the assembling of heavy equipment. The first known construction cranes were invented by the Ancient Greeks and were powered by men or beasts of burden, such as donkeys. These cranes were used for the construction of tall buildings. Larger cranes were later developed, employing the use of human treadwheels, permitting the lifting of heavier weights
[...More...]

"Crane (machine)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dam
A dam is a barrier that stops or restricts the flow of water or underground streams. Reservoirs created by dams not only suppress floods but also provide water for activities such as irrigation, human consumption, industrial use, aquaculture, and navigability. Hydropower is often used in conjunction with dams to generate electricity. A dam can also be used to collect water or for storage of water which can be evenly distributed between locations. Dams generally serve the primary purpose of retaining water, while other structures such as floodgates or levees (also known as dikes) are used to manage or prevent water flow into specific land regions. The word dam can be traced back to Middle English,[1] and before that, from Middle Dutch, as seen in the names of many old cities.[2] The first known appearance of dam occurs in 1165. However, there is one village, Obdam, that is already mentioned in 1120
[...More...]

"Dam" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dock (maritime)
A dock (from Dutch dok) is the area of water between or next to one or a group of human-made structures that are involved in the handling of boats or ships (usually on or near a shore) or such structures themselves
[...More...]

"Dock (maritime)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Electricity Grid
An electrical grid is an interconnected network for delivering electricity from producers to consumers. It consists of generating stations that produce electrical power, high voltage transmission lines that carry power from distant sources to demand centers, and distribution lines that connect individual customers.[1] Power stations may be located near a fuel source, at a dam site, or to take advantage of renewable energy sources, and are often located away from heavily populated areas. They are usually quite large to take advantage of economies of scale
[...More...]

"Electricity Grid" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ferry Slip
A ferry slip is a specialized docking facility that receives a ferryboat or train ferry. A similar structure called a barge slip receives a barge or car float that is used to carry wheeled vehicles across a body of water. Often a ferry intended for motor vehicle transport will carry its own adjustable ramp - when elevated it acts as a wave guard and is lowered to a horizontal position at the terminus to meet a permanent road segment that extends under water. In other cases, the ramp is installed at the ferry slip and is called a linkspan or apron. Such a ramp is adjustable to accommodate varying water heights and ferry loadings and to move it out of the way during approach and exit
[...More...]

"Ferry Slip" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Flume
A flume is a human-made channel for water in the form of an open declined gravity chute whose walls are raised above the surrounding terrain, in contrast to a trench or ditch.[1][2] Flumes are not to be confused with aqueducts, which are built to transport water, rather than transporting materials using flowing water as a flume does.[citation needed] Flumes route water from a diversion dam or weir to a desired materiel collection location. Many flumes took[when?] the form of wooden troughs elevated on trestles, often following the natural contours of the land. Originating as a part of a mill race, they were later used in the transportation of logs in the logging industry, known as a log flume. They were also extensively used in hydraulic mining and working placer deposits for gold, tin and other heavy minerals.Contents1 Etymology 2 Types of flumes2.1 Millrace 2.2 Log flume 2.3 Flow measurement flume 2.4 Navigable canal flume 2.5 Recreational flumes3 See also
[...More...]

"Flume" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fractionating Column
A fractionating column is an essential item used in distillation of liquid mixtures so as to separate the mixture into its component parts, or fractions, based on the differences in volatilities. Fractionating columns are used in small scale laboratory distillations as well as for large-scale industrial distillations.Contents1 Laboratory fractionating columns 2 Industrial fractionating columns 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksLaboratory fractionating columns[edit]Figure 1: Fractional distillation
Fractional distillation
apparatus using a Liebig condenser. Vigreux column
Vigreux column
in a laboratory setupA laboratory fractionating column is a piece of glassware used to separate vaporized mixtures of liquid compounds with close volatility. It can also be called a fractional column
[...More...]

"Fractionating Column" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Golden Gate Bridge
The Golden Gate
Golden Gate
Bridge is a suspension bridge spanning the Golden Gate, the one-mile-wide (1.6 km) strait connecting San Francisco Bay and the Pacific Ocean. The structure links the American city of San Francisco, California
California
– the northern tip of the San Francisco Peninsula – to Marin County, carrying both U.S. Route 101
U.S. Route 101
and California State Route 1
California State Route 1
across the strait. The bridge is one of the most internationally recognized symbols of San Francisco, California, and the United States
[...More...]

"Golden Gate Bridge" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gate
A gate or gateway is a point of entry to a space which is enclosed by walls. Gates may prevent or control the entry or exit of individuals, or they may be merely decorative. Other terms for gate include yett and port. The word derives from the old Norse "gata", meaning road or path, and originally referred to the gap in the wall or fence, rather than the barrier which closed it. The moving part or parts of a gateway may be called "doors", but used for the whole point of entry door usually refers to the entry to a building, or an internal opening between different rooms. A gate may have a latch to keep it from swinging and a lock for security. Larger gates can be used for a whole building, such as a castle or fortified town, or the actual doors that block entry through the gatehouse
[...More...]

"Gate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Handrail
A handrail is a rail that is designed to be grasped by the hand so as to provide stability or support.[1] Handrails are commonly used while ascending or descending stairways and escalators in order to prevent injurious falls. Handrails are typically supported by posts or mounted directly to walls. Similar items not covered in this article include bathroom handrails—which help to prevent falls on slippery, wet floors—other grab bars, used, for instance, in ships' galleys, and barres, which serve as training aids for ballet dancers
[...More...]

"Handrail" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.