HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Nonbuilding Structure
A NONBUILDING STRUCTURE, also referred to simply as a STRUCTURE, refers to any body or system of connected parts used to support a load that was not designed for continuous human occupancy . The term is used by architects , structural engineers , and mechanical engineers to distinctly identify built structures that are not buildings
[...More...]

"Nonbuilding Structure" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Eiffel Tower
The EIFFEL TOWER (/ˈaɪfəl ˈtaʊ.ər/ _EYE-fəl TOW-ər_ ; French : _tour Eiffel_, pronounced listen ) is a wrought iron lattice tower on the Champ de Mars
Champ de Mars
in Paris
Paris
, France
France
. It is named after the engineer Gustave Eiffel , whose company designed and built the tower. Constructed from 1887–89 as the entrance to the 1889 World\'s Fair , it was initially criticized by some of France's leading artists and intellectuals for its design, but it has become a global cultural icon of France
France
and one of the most recognisable structures in the world. The Eiffel Tower
Eiffel Tower
is the most-visited paid monument in the world; 6.91 million people ascended it in 2015. The tower is 324 metres (1,063 ft) tall, about the same height as an 81-storey building, and the tallest structure in Paris
Paris

[...More...]

"Eiffel Tower" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Golden Gate Bridge
The GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE is a suspension bridge spanning the Golden Gate , the one-mile-wide (1.6 km) strait connecting San Francisco
San Francisco
Bay and the Pacific Ocean
Pacific Ocean
. The structure links the American city of San Francisco , California
California
– the northern tip of the San Francisco Peninsula – to Marin County , carrying both U.S. Route 101 and California State Route 1 across the strait. The bridge is one of the most internationally recognized symbols of San Francisco, California, and the United States. It has been declared one of the Wonders of the Modern World by the American Society of Civil Engineers
[...More...]

"Golden Gate Bridge" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Transmission Tower
A TRANSMISSION TOWER or POWER TOWER (ELECTRICITY PYLON in the United Kingdom, Canada and parts of Europe) is a tall structure , usually a steel lattice tower , used to support an overhead power line . They are used in high-voltage AC and DC systems, and come in a wide variety of shapes and sizes. Typical height ranges from 15 to 55 m (49 to 180 ft), though the tallest are the 370 m (1,214 ft) towers of a 2,700 m (8,858 ft) span of Zhoushan Island Overhead Powerline Tie . In addition to steel, other materials may be used, including concrete and wood. There are four major categories of transmission towers: suspension , terminal, tension , and transposition . Some transmission towers combine these basic functions. Transmission towers and their overhead power lines are often considered to be a form of visual pollution . Methods to reduce the visual effect include undergrounding
[...More...]

"Transmission Tower" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Occupancy
Within the context of building construction and building codes , "OCCUPANCY" refers to the use, or intended use, of a building, or portion of a building, for the shelter or support of persons, animals or property. A closely related meaning is the number of units in such a building that are rented , leased , or otherwise in use. Lack of occupancy, in this sense, is a vacancy. CONTENTS * 1 Building
Building
codes * 2 Building
Building
utilization * 3 Other meanings * 4 See also * 5 References BUILDING CODESIt is possible to have multiple occupancies (or building uses) within one building. For example, a high-rise building can have retail stores occupying the lower levels, while the upper levels are residential. Different occupancies within a building are separated by a fire barrier with a defined fire-resistance rating
[...More...]

"Occupancy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Architect
An ARCHITECT is someone who plans, designs, and reviews the construction of buildings . To _practice architecture_ means to provide services in connection with the design of buildings and the space within the site surrounding the buildings, that have as their principal purpose human occupancy or use. Etymologically, _architect_ derives from the Latin _architectus_, which derives from the Greek _(_arkhi-_, chief +_ tekton_, builder), i.e., CHIEF BUILDER. _ Professionally, an architect's decisions affect public safety, and thus an architect must undergo specialized training consisting of advanced education and a _practicum_ (or _internship_) for practical experience to earn a license to practice architecture . Practical, technical, and academic requirements for becoming an architect vary by jurisdiction (see below)
[...More...]

"Architect" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Structural Engineer
STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS analyze, design, plan, and research structural components and structural systems to achieve design goals and ensure the safety and comfort of users or occupants. Their work takes account mainly of safety, technical, economic and environmental concerns, but they may also consider aesthetic and social factors. Structural engineering
Structural engineering
is usually considered a specialty discipline within civil engineering , but it can also be studied in its own right. In the United States, most practicing structural engineers are currently licensed as civil engineers , but the situation varies from state to state. Some states have a separate license for structural engineers which is required to design special or high risk structures such as schools, hospitals, or skyscrapers
[...More...]

"Structural Engineer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mechanical Engineering
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING is the discipline that applies engineering , physics , and materials science principles to design , analyze, manufacture, and maintain mechanical systems . It is the branch of engineering that involves the design, production, and operation of machinery . It is one of the oldest and broadest of the engineering disciplines . The mechanical engineering field requires an understanding of core areas including mechanics , dynamics , thermodynamics , materials science , structural analysis , and electricity . In addition to these core principles, mechanical engineers use tools such as computer-aided design (CAD), and product life cycle management to design and analyze manufacturing plants , industrial equipment and machinery , heating and cooling systems , transport systems, aircraft , watercraft , robotics , medical devices , weapons , and others
[...More...]

"Mechanical Engineering" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Structure
STRUCTURE is an arrangement and organization of interrelated elements in a material object or system , or the object or system so organized. Material structures include man-made objects such as buildings and machines and natural objects such as biological organisms , minerals and chemicals . Abstract structures include data structures in computer science and musical form . Types of structure include a hierarchy (a cascade of one-to-many relationships), a network featuring many-to-many links , or a lattice featuring connections between components that are neighbors in space
[...More...]

"Structure" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Building
A BUILDING or EDIFICE is a structure with a roof and walls standing more or less permanently in one place, such as a house or factory . Buildings come in a variety of sizes, shapes and functions, and have been adapted throughout history for a wide number of factors, from building materials available, to weather conditions, to land prices, ground conditions, specific uses and aesthetic reasons. To better understand the term _building_ compare the list of nonbuilding structures . Buildings serve several needs of society – primarily as shelter from weather, security, living space, privacy, to store belongings, and to comfortably live and work. A building as a shelter represents a physical division of the human habitat (a place of comfort and safety) and the _outside_ (a place that at times may be harsh and harmful). Ever since the first cave paintings , buildings have also become objects or canvasses of much artistic expression
[...More...]

"Building" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aerial Lift Pylon
An AERIAL LIFT PYLON is a pylon -like construction bearing the cables of an aerial lift such as an aerial tramway or gondola lift . Large pylons of aerial tramways usually consist of a steel framework construction, smaller pylons of gondola lifts are made of tubular steel. Early aerial tramways often had pylons of reinforced concrete and ropeway conveyors had timber pylons, if they were cheaper than steel pylons. Pylons are not designed as a stopping-off point for passengers or goods, but some are designed to allow maintenance staff access to the cars. Some pylons have built-in ladders or stairs for maintenance access, and some taller examples have an elevator. The best-known and second-tallest pylon is the Torre Jaume I
Torre Jaume I
in Barcelona
Barcelona
. The tallest pylon is on the Gletscherbahn 1 at Kaprun , Austria
Austria
, with a height of 113.7 metres
[...More...]

"Aerial Lift Pylon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aqueduct (water Supply)
An AQUEDUCT is a watercourse constructed to convey water. In modern engineering, the term aqueduct is used for any system of pipes, ditches, canals, tunnels, and other structures used for this purpose. The term aqueduct also often refers specifically to a bridge on an artificial watercourse. The word is derived from the Latin aqua ("water") and ducere ("to lead"). Aqueducts were used in ancient Greece
Greece
, ancient Egypt , and ancient Rome . In modern times, the largest aqueducts of all have been built in the United States to supply the country's biggest cities. The simplest aqueducts are small ditches cut into the earth. Much larger channels may be used in modern aqueducts. Aqueducts sometimes run for some or all of their path through tunnels constructed underground. Modern aqueducts may also use pipelines. Historically, agricultural societies have constructed aqueducts to irrigate crops and supply large cities with drinking water
[...More...]

"Aqueduct (water Supply)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Arena
An ARENA, also known as INDOOR STADIUM, is an enclosed area, often circular or oval-shaped, designed to showcase theater , musical performances , or sporting events . The word derives from Latin _harena_, a particularly fine/smooth sand used to absorb blood in ancient arenas such as the Colosseum in Rome . It is composed of a large open space surrounded on most or all sides by tiered seating for spectators. The key feature of an arena is that the event space is the lowest point, allowing for maximum visibility. Arenas are usually designed to accommodate a large number of spectators. The term _arena_ is sometimes used as a synonym for a very large venue such as Pasadena's Rose Bowl , but such a facility is typically called a _stadium _, especially if it does not have a roof
[...More...]

"Arena" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Barricade
BARRICADE, from the French barrique (barrel), is any object or structure that creates a barrier or obstacle to control, block passage or force the flow of traffic in the desired direction. Adopted as a military term, a barricade denotes any improvised field fortification , such as on city streets during urban warfare . Barricades also include temporary traffic barricades designed with the goal of dissuading passage into a protected or hazardous area or large slabs of cement whose goal is to prevent forcible passage by a vehicle. Stripes on barricades and panel devices slope downward in the direction traffic must travel. There are also pedestrian barricades - sometimes called bike rack barricades for their resemblance to a now obsolete form of bicycle stand , or police barriers. They originated in France approximately 50 years ago and are now produced around the world. They were first produced in the U.S
[...More...]

"Barricade" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Blast Furnace
A BLAST FURNACE is a type of metallurgical furnace used for smelting to produce industrial metals, generally iron , but also others such as lead or copper . In a blast furnace, fuel, ores , and flux (limestone) are continuously supplied through the top of the furnace, while a hot blast of air (sometimes with oxygen enrichment) is blown into the lower section of the furnace through a series of pipes called tuyeres , so that the chemical reactions take place throughout the furnace as the material moves downward. The end products are usually molten metal and slag phases tapped from the bottom, and flue gases exiting from the top of the furnace. The downward flow of the ore and flux in contact with an upflow of hot, carbon monoxide-rich combustion gases is a countercurrent exchange and chemical reaction process. In contrast, air furnaces (such as reverberatory furnaces ) are naturally aspirated