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Non-metropolitan County
A non-metropolitan county, or colloquially, shire county, is a county-level entity in England
England
that is not a metropolitan county. The counties typically have populations of 300,000 to 1.4 million.[1] The term shire county is, however, an unofficial usage. Many of the non-metropolitan counties bear historic names and most end in the suffix "-shire" such as Wiltshire
Wiltshire
or Staffordshire. Of the remainder, some counties had the -shire ending and have lost it over time; such as Devon
Devon
and Somerset
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Peterborough, Cambridgeshire
Peterborough (/ˈpiːtərbrə, -bərə, -ˌbʌrə/ ( listen)) is a cathedral city in Cambridgeshire, England, with a population of 183,631 in 2011.[5] Historically part of Northamptonshire, it is 75 miles (121 km) north of London, on the River Nene which flows into the North Sea 30 miles (48 km) to the north-east. The railway station is an important stop on the East Coast Main Line between London and Edinburgh. The local topography is flat and in some places lies below sea level, for example in the Fens that lie to the east of Peterborough. Human settlement in the area began before the Bronze Age, as can be seen at the Flag Fen archaeological site to the east of the current city centre, also with evidence of Roman occupation
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Unitary Authority
A unitary authority is a type of local authority that has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area or performs additional functions which elsewhere in the relevant country are usually performed by national government or a higher level of sub-national government. Typically unitary authorities cover towns or cities which are large enough to function independently of county or other regional administration. Sometimes they consist of national sub-divisions which are distinguished from others in the same country by having no lower level of administration.Contents1 Canada 2 Central Europe 3 Denmark 4 New Zealand 5 Poland 6 United Kingdom6.1 England 6.2 Northern Ireland 6.3 Scotland 6.4 Wales7 United States 8 See also 9 ReferencesCanada[edit] In Canada, each province creates its own system of local government, so terminology varies substantially. In certain provinces (e.g
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Luton
Luton
Luton
(/ˈluːtən/ ( listen) LOOT-ən)[4] is a large town in Bedfordshire, England,[5][6] 20 miles (30 km) east of Aylesbury, 14 miles (20 km) west of Stevenage, 30 miles (50 km) northwest of London, and 22 miles (40 km) southeast of Milton Keynes. London
London
Luton
Luton
Airport, opened in 1938, is one of Britain's major airports. The University of Bedfordshire
Bedfordshire
is also based in the town. Luton
Luton
is home to League Two team Luton
Luton
Town Football Club, whose history includes several spells in the top flight of the English league as well as a Football League Cup
Football League Cup
triumph in 1988
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Lord-Lieutenant
The Lord-Lieutenant (/lɛfˈtɛnənt/[1]) is the British monarch's personal representative in each county of the United Kingdom. Historically, the lieutenant was responsible for organising the county's militia. In 1871, the lieutenant's responsibility over the local militia was removed
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High Sheriff
A high sheriff is a ceremonial officer for each shrieval county of England and Wales
England and Wales
and Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
or the chief sheriff of a number of paid sheriffs in U.S. states who outranks and commands the others in their court-related functions. In Canada, the High Sheriff provides administrative services to the supreme and provincial courts. The office existed in what is now the Republic of Ireland
Republic of Ireland
but was abolished there in 1926. In England and Wales, the offices of high sheriff arose at the direction of the Local Government Act 1972
Local Government Act 1972
incepting on 1 April 1974. The purpose was to distinguish sheriffs of counties proper from sheriffs of cities and boroughs designated counties corporate
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Royal Mail
Royal Mail
Mail
plc (Welsh: Post Brenhinol; Scottish Gaelic: a' Phuist Rìoghail) is a postal service and courier company in the United Kingdom, originally established in 1516. The company's subsidiary, Royal Mail
Mail
Group Limited, operates the brands Royal Mail
Mail
(letters) and Parcelforce
Parcelforce
Worldwide (parcels). General Logistics Systems, an international logistics company, is a wholly owned subsidiary of Royal Mail
Mail
Group. The company provides mail collection and delivery services throughout the UK. Letters are deposited in a pillar or wall box, taken to a post office, or collected in bulk from businesses. Deliveries are made at least once every day except Sundays and bank holidays at uniform charges for all UK destinations
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Postal Counties Of The United Kingdom
The postal counties of the United Kingdom, now known as former postal counties,[1] were postal subdivisions in routine use by the Royal Mail until 1996.[2] The purpose of the postal county – as opposed to any other kind of county – was to aid the sorting of mail by differentiating between like-sounding post towns. Since 1996 this has been done by using the outward code (first half) of the postcode instead. For operational reasons the former postal counties, although broadly based on the counties of the United Kingdom, did not match up with their boundaries: in some cases there were significant differences. The boundaries changed over time as post towns were created or amended. According to the Royal Mail, the former postal county data no longer forms part of postal addresses
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Local Government Commission For England (1992)
A government is the system or group of people governing an organized community, often a state.[1] In the case of its broad associative definition, government normally consists of legislature, executive, and judiciary. Government
Government
is a means by which state policies are enforced, as well as a mechanism for determining the policy. Each government has a kind of constitution, a statement of its governing principles and philosophy. Typically the philosophy chosen is some balance between the principle of individual freedom and the idea of absolute state authority (tyranny). While all types of organizations have governance, the word government is often used more specifically to refer to the approximately 200 independent national governments on Earth, as well as subsidiary organizations.[2] Historically prevalent forms of government include aristocracy, timocracy, oligarchy, democracy, theocracy and tyranny
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Statutory Instrument
In many countries, a statutory instrument is a form of delegated legislation.Contents1 United Kingdom1.1 England
England
and Wales 1.2 Scotland 1.3 Northern Ireland2 Republic of Ireland 3 United States 4 Other countries 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksUnited Kingdom[edit] Statutory instruments are the principal form of delegated or secondary legislation in the United Kingdom. England
England
and Wales[edit] Main article: Statutory instrument (UK) In England
England
and Wales, statutory instruments (or "regulations")[1] are primarily governed by the Statutory Instruments Act 1946,[2] which replaced the system of statutory rules and orders governed by the Rules Publication Act 1893. Wales
Wales
Statutory Instruments are published as a subseries of the UK statutory instrument series—for example, the Environment (Wales) Act 2016 (Commencement No
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Administrative Counties Of England
Administrative counties were a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government from 1889 to 1974. They were created by the Local Government Act 1888
Local Government Act 1888
as the areas for which county councils were elected. Some large counties were divided into several administrative counties, each with its own county council
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Lieutenancies Act 1997
The Lieutenancies Act 1997
Lieutenancies Act 1997
(1997 c. 23) is an Act of Parliament
Act of Parliament
in the United Kingdom, that defines areas that Lord-Lieutenants are appointed to in Great Britain. It came into force on 1 July 1997.Contents1 Creation of modern local government 2 Local government re-organisation 3 Passage through Parliament 4 Lieutenancy areas 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksCreation of modern local government[edit] Prior to the Local Government Act 1888, a Lord-Lieutenant
Lord-Lieutenant
was appointed to each of the counties. However this Act redefined the areas to be combinations of the new administrative counties and county boroughs
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2009 Structural Changes To Local Government In England
Structural changes to local government in England were effected on 1 April 2009, whereby a number of new unitary authorities were created in parts of the country which previously operated a 'two-tier' system of counties and districts. In five shire counties the functions of the county and district councils were combined into a single authority; and in two counties the powers of the county council were absorbed into a significantly reduced number of districts. Elections to the new authorities took place on 1 May 2008 for some of the new authorities, which took up their powers on 1 April 2009
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Local Government And Public Involvement In Health Act 2007
The Local Government and Public Involvement in Health Act 2007 (c 28) is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. The Act allows for the implementation of many provisions outlined in the Government white paper Strong and Prosperous Communities including changes to local government in England
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Bristol
Urban Chris Skidmore
Chris Skidmore
(Con) Jack Lopresti
Jack Lopresti
(Con)Area • City and county 40 sq mi (110 km2)Elevation[1] 36&#
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Bedfordshire
Bedfordshire
Bedfordshire
(/ˈbɛdfərdʃər, -ʃɪər/; abbreviated Beds.) is a county in the East of England. It is a ceremonial county and a historic county, covered by three unitary authorities: Bedford, Central Bedfordshire, and Luton. Bedfordshire
Bedfordshire
is bordered by Cambridgeshire
Cambridgeshire
to the east/northeast, Northamptonshire
Northamptonshire
to the north, Buckinghamshire
Buckinghamshire
to the west and Hertfordshire
Hertfordshire
to the east/southeast
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