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No Game No Life
No Game
Game
No Life (Japanese: ノーゲーム・ノーライフ, Hepburn: Nōgēmu Nōraifu) is a light novel series by Yū Kamiya. It is published under the MF Bunko J imprint with nine novels released between April 25, 2012 and August 25, 2016. The author and his wife, Mashiro Hiiragi, adapted the novels into a manga series for Monthly Comic Alive in 2013. Later that year, an anime adaptation of No Game No Life by Madhouse was announced. It premiered on AT-X between April and July 2014, and was simulcast outside Japan by Crunchyroll. An anime film adaptation of the sixth volume, No Game
Game
No Life: Zero, premiered on July 15, 2017. A spinoff manga, No Game
Game
No Life, Please!, focusing on the character Izuna, ran from May 27, 2015 to November 27, 2017
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Adventure
An adventure is an exciting experience that is typically a bold, sometimes risky, undertaking.[1] Adventures may be activities with some potential for physical danger such as traveling, exploring, skydiving, mountain climbing, scuba diving, river rafting or participating in extreme sports.Contents1 Motivation 2 Mythology and fiction2.1 Outdoors 2.2 Questing 2.3 Video games3 Nonfiction works 4 Adventure
Adventure
sports 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksMotivation[edit] Adventurous experiences create psychological arousal,[2] which can be interpreted as negative (e.g. fear) or positive (e.g. flow)
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Hikikomori
In Japan, hikikomori (Japanese: ひきこもり or 引き籠り, lit. "pulling inward, being confined", i.e., "acute social withdrawal") are reclusive adolescents or adults who withdraw from social life, often seeking extreme degrees of isolation and confinement. Hikikomori
Hikikomori
refers to both the phenomenon in general and the recluses themselves
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Madman Entertainment
Madman Entertainment
Entertainment
is an Australian company that distributes Australian and foreign films as well as television series, children's content, sports, Japanese anime and manga, graphic novels in Australia, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Fiji
Fiji
and the rest of Australasia. Madman is one of the major entertainment companies in Australia. It employs approx 100 people and has an annual turnover of around A$50 million.[1] Its headquarters is in Richmond, Victoria.[2][3] Madman has secured the local release rights to popular titles including Sailor Moon, One Piece, Dragon Ball, Neon Genesis Evangelion, Akira, Steins;Gate
Steins;Gate
and almost all of Studio Ghibli's catalogue
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Japanese Language
Japanese (日本語, Nihongo, [ɲihoŋɡo] or [ɲihoŋŋo] ( listen)) is an East Asian language spoken by about 126 million people, primarily in Japan, where it is the national language. It is a member of the Japonic (or Japanese-Ryukyuan) language family, and its relation to other languages, such as Korean, is debated. Japanese has been grouped with language families such as Ainu, Austroasiatic, and the now-discredited Altaic, but none of these proposals has gained widespread acceptance. Little is known of the language's prehistory, or when it first appeared in Japan. Chinese documents from the 3rd century recorded a few Japanese words, but substantial texts did not appear until the 8th century. During the Heian period
Heian period
(794–1185), Chinese had considerable influence on the vocabulary and phonology of Old Japanese
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Hepburn Romanization
Hepburn romanization
Hepburn romanization
(ヘボン式ローマ字, Hebon-shiki Rōmaji, 'Hepburn-type Roman letters')[1] is a system for the romanization of Japanese, that uses the Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
to write the Japanese language. It is used by most foreigners learning to spell Japanese in the Latin alphabet[2] and by the Japanese for romanizing personal names, geographical locations, and other information such as train tables, road signs, and official communications with foreign countries.[3] Largely based on English writing conventions, consonants closely correspond to the English pronunciation and vowels approximate the Italian pronunciation.[1] The Hepburn style (Hebon-shiki) was developed in the late 19th century by an international commission that was formed to develop a unified system of romanization
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Imprint (trade Name)
An imprint of a publisher is a trade name under which it publishes a work. A single publishing company may have multiple imprints, often using the different names as brands to market works to various demographic consumer segments.[1] Description[edit] An imprint of a publisher is a trade name—a name that a business uses for trading commercial products or services—under which a work is published. Imprints typically have a defining character or mission. In some cases, the diversity results from the takeover of smaller publishers (or parts of their business) by a larger company. In the case of Barnes & Noble, imprints have been used to facilitate the venture of a bookseller into publishing.[2] Use[edit] A single publishing company may have multiple imprints, with the different imprints often used by the publisher to market works to different demographic consumer segments
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Manga
Manga
Manga
(漫画, Manga) are comics created in Japan
Japan
or by creators in the Japanese language, conforming to a style developed in Japan
Japan
in the late 19th century.[1] They have a long and complex pre-history in earlier Japanese art.[2] The term manga (kanji: 漫画; hiragana: まんが; katakana: マンガ;  listen (help·info); English: /ˈmæŋɡə/ or /ˈmɑːŋɡə/) in Japan
Japan
is a word used to refer to both comics and cartooning. "Manga" as a term used outside Japan
Japan
refers to comics originally published in Japan.[3] In Japan, people of all ages read manga
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Anime
Anime
Anime
(/ˈænəˌmeɪ/ (Japanese: アニメ, [aɲime] ( listen), plural: anime))[a] is a style of hand-drawn and computer animation originating in, and commonly associated with, Japan. The word anime is the Japanese term for animation, which means all forms of animated media.[1] Outside Japan, anime refers specifically to animation from Japan
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Simulcast
Simulcast, a portmanteau of simultaneous broadcast, is the broadcasting of programs or events across more than one medium, or more than one service on the same medium, at exactly the same time (that is, simultaneously). For example, Absolute Radio
Absolute Radio
is simulcast on both AM and on satellite radio.[1][2] Likewise, the BBC's Prom concerts were formerly simulcast on both BBC
BBC
Radio 3 and BBC Television. Another application is the transmission of the original-language soundtrack of movies or TV series over local or Internet radio, with the television broadcast having been dubbed into a local language.Contents1 Early radio simulcasts 2 Simulcasting to provide stereo sound for TV broadcasts 3 Other uses3.1 Simulcasting of sporting events4 See also 5 ReferencesEarly radio simulcasts[edit] Before launching stereo radio, experiments were conducted by transmitting left and right channels on different radio channels
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Crunchyroll
Crunchyroll
Crunchyroll
is an American distributor, publisher, licensing company and international online community focused on video streaming East Asian media including anime, manga, drama, music, electronic entertainment, and content. Founded in 2006 by a group of University of California, Berkeley graduates,[3] Crunchyroll's distribution channel and partnership program delivers content to over 35 million online community members worldwide
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Game
A game is a structured form of play, usually undertaken for enjoyment and sometimes used as an educational tool.[1] Games are distinct from work, which is usually carried out for remuneration, and from art, which is more often an expression of aesthetic or ideological elements. However, the distinction is not clear-cut, and many games are also considered to be work (such as professional players of spectator sports or games) or art (such as jigsaw puzzles or games involving an artistic layout such as Mahjong, solitaire, or some video games). Games are sometimes played purely for entertainment, sometimes for achievement or reward as well. They can be played alone, in teams, or online; by amateurs or by professionals. The players may have an audience of non-players, such as when people are entertained by watching a chess championship
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Nippon BS Broadcasting
Nippon BS Broadcasting
Nippon BS Broadcasting
Corporation (日本BS放送株式会社, Nippon Bīesu Hōsō Kabushiki Gaisha) is a private satellite broadcasting station in Kanda, Tokyo, Japan. It is an independent television station and is a subsidiary of Bic Camera. Its channel name is BS11 (BS Eleven) and was BS11 Digital until March 31, 2011
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List Of The New York Times Manga Best Sellers
The New York Times
The New York Times
Best Seller list for manga published in the United States was introduced on March 5, 2009, along with two additional lists for hardcover and paperback graphic novels. The three lists were grouped under the "Graphic Books" category
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Fan Service
Fan service
Fan service
(ファンサービス, fan sābisu), fanservice, or service cut (サービスカット, sābisu katto),[1][2] is material in a work of fiction or in a fictional series which is intentionally added to please the audience.[3] The term originated in Japanese,[4][5] in the anime and manga fandom, but has been used in other languages and media. It is about "servicing" the fan[6] – giving the fans "exactly what they want."[7] Fan service
Fan service
usually refers to "gratuitous titillation", but can also refer to intertextual references to other series[3][8] or story and visual elements that audiences tend to desire.Contents1 History 2 Types 3 In translation 4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingHistory[edit] Direct and deliberate audience titillation is nearly as old as fiction itself
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Online Game
An online game is a video game that is either partially or primarily played through the Internet
Internet
or any other computer network available .[1] Online games are ubiquitous on modern gaming platforms, including PCs, consoles and mobile devices, and span many genres, including first-person shooters, strategy games and massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPG).[2] The design of online games can range from simple text-based environments to the incorporation of complex graphics and virtual worlds.[3] The existence of online components within a game can range from being minor features, such
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