HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

Nitroglycerin (drug)
Nitroglycerin, also known as glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), is a medication used for heart failure, high blood pressure, and to treat and prevent chest pain from not enough blood flow to the heart (angina) or due to cocaine.[1] This includes chest pain from a heart attack.[1] It is taken by mouth, under the tongue, applied to the skin, or by injection into a vein.[1] Common side effects include headache and low blood pressure.[1] The low blood pressure can be severe.[1] It is unclear if use in pregnancy is safe for the baby.[1] It should not be used together with medications within the sildenafil (PDE5 inhibitor) family due to the risk of low blood pressure.[1] Nitroglycerin
[...More...]

picture info

JSmol
Jmol
Jmol
is computer software for molecular modelling chemical structures in 3-dimensions.[2] Jmol
Jmol
returns a 3D representation of a molecule that may be used as a teaching tool,[3] or for research e.g., in chemistry and biochemistry. It is written in the programming language Java, so it can run on the operating systems Windows, macOS, Linux, and Unix, if Java is installed. It is free and open-source software released under a GNU Lesser General Public License
GNU Lesser General Public License
(LGPL) version 2.0. A standalone application and a software development kit (SDK) exist that can be integrated into other Java applications, such as Bioclipse and Taverna. A popular feature is an applet that can be integrated into web pages to display molecules in a variety of ways
[...More...]

Sublingual Administration
Sublingual (abbreviated SL), from the Latin
Latin
for "under the tongue", refers to the pharmacological route of administration by which substances diffuse into the blood through tissues under the tongue. Many drugs are designed for sublingual administration, including cardiovascular drugs, steroids, barbiturates, benzodiazepines,[1] opioid analgesics, enzymes and, increasingly, vitamins and minerals.Contents1 Principle 2 Forms 3 Substance 4 Psychoactives 5 Allergens 6 Therapeutic peptides and proteins 7 Vaccines 8 Footnotes 9 External linksPrinciple[edit] When a chemical comes in contact with the mucous membrane beneath the tongue, it is absorbed. Because the connective tissue beneath the epithelium contains a profusion of capillaries, the substance then diffuses into them and enters the venous circulation
[...More...]

picture info

American Society Of Health-System Pharmacists
The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists
Pharmacists
(ASHP) is a professional organization representing the interests of pharmacists who practice in hospitals, health maintenance organizations, long-term care facilities, home care, and other components of health care. Previously it was known as the American Society of Hospital Pharmacists. As of 2018[update], ASHP has 45,000 members and a staff of more than 200.Contents1 History 2 Aim 3 Publications 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] By 1939 a subsection of hospital pharmacists was formed in the American Pharmaceutical Association (APhA), and for the first time, hospital pharmacists had a voice in a national organization. In 1942, hospital pharmacists established the American Society of Hospital Pharmacists, affiliated with APhA
[...More...]

picture info

Simplified Molecular-input Line-entry System
The simplified molecular-input line-entry system (SMILES) is a specification in form of a line notation for describing the structure of chemical species using short ASCII
ASCII
strings. SMILES strings can be imported by most molecule editors for conversion back into two-dimensional drawings or three-dimensional models of the molecules. The original SMILES specification was initiated in the 1980s. It has since been modified and extended. In 2007, an open standard called OpenSMILES was developed in the open-source chemistry community
[...More...]

picture info

International Chemical Identifier
The IUPAC
IUPAC
International Chemical Identifier
Identifier
(InChI /ˈɪntʃiː/ IN-chee or /ˈɪŋkiː/ ING-kee) is a textual identifier for chemical substances, designed to provide a standard way to encode molecular information and to facilitate the search for such information in databases and on the web
[...More...]

picture info

Heart Failure
Heart
Heart
failure (HF), often referred to as congestive heart failure (CHF), is when the heart is unable to pump sufficiently to maintain blood flow to meet the body's needs.[9][10][11] Signs and symptoms commonly include shortness of breath, excessive tiredness, and leg swelling.[2] The shortness of breath is usually worse with exercise, while lying down, and may wake the person at night.[2] A limited ability to exercise is also a common feature.[12] Chest pain, including angina, does not typically occur due to heart failure.[13] Common causes of heart failure include coronary artery disease including a previous myocardial infarction (heart attack), h
[...More...]

picture info

High Blood Pressure
Hypertension
Hypertension
(HTN or HT), also known as high blood pressure (HBP), is a long-term medical condition in which the blood pressure in the arteries is persistently elevated.[10] High blood pressure usually does not cause symptoms.[1] Long-term high blood pressure, however, is a major risk factor for coronary artery disease, stroke, heart failure, atrial fibrillation, peripheral vascular disease, vision loss, chronic kidney disease, and dementia.[2][3][4][11] High blood pressure is classified as either primary (essential) high blood pressure or secondary high blood pressure.[5] About
[...More...]

picture info

Angina Pectoris
Angina, also known as angina pectoris, is chest pain or pressure, usually due to not enough blood flow to the heart muscle. Angina
Angina
is usually due to obstruction or spasm of the coronary arteries.[1] Other causes include anemia, abnormal heart rhythms, and heart failure. The main mechanism of coronary artery obstruction is an atherosclerosis. The term derives from the Latin
Latin
angere ("to strangle") and pectus ("chest"), and can therefore be translated as "a strangling feeling in the chest". There is a weak relationship between severity of pain and degree of oxygen deprivation in the heart muscle (i.e., there can be severe pain with little or no risk of a myocardial infarction (heart attack) and a heart attack can occur without pain). In some cases, angina can be quite severe, and in the early 20th century this was a known sign of impending death.[2] However, given current medical therapies, the outlook has improved substantially
[...More...]

picture info

Cocaine
Cocaine, also known as coke, is a strong stimulant mostly used as a recreational drug.[10] It is commonly snorted, inhaled as smoke, or as a solution injected into a vein.[9] Mental effects may include loss of contact with reality, an intense feeling of happiness, or agitation.[9] Physical symptoms may include a fast heart rate, sweating, and large pupils.[9] High doses can result in very high blood pressure or body temperature.[11] Effects begin within seconds to minutes of use and last between five and ninety minutes.[9] Cocaine has a small number of accepted medical uses such as numbing and decreasing bleeding during nasal surgery.[12] Cocaine
[...More...]

Coronary Artery Spasm
Coronary vasospasm is a sudden, intense vasoconstriction of an epicardial coronary artery that causes occlusion (stoppage) or near-occlusion of the vessel. It can cause Prinzmetal's angina. It can occur in multiple vessels.[1][2] Atropine
Atropine
has been used to treat the condition.[3] See also[edit]Angiography Cardiac CT Myocardial bridgeReferences[edit]^ Ahooja V, Thatai D (July 2007). "Multivessel coronary vasospasm mimicking triple-vessel obstructive coronary artery disease". J Invasive Cardiol. 19 (7): E178–81. PMID 17620681. Archived from the original on 2009-01-16.  ^ Miwa K, Ishii K, Makita T, Okuda N (May 2004). "Diagnosis of multivessel coronary vasospasm by detecting postischemic regional left ventricular delayed relaxation on echocardiography using color kinesis". Circ. J. 68 (5): 483–7. doi:10.1253/circj.68.483. PMID 15118293
[...More...]

picture info

Intravenous
Intravenous therapy
Intravenous therapy
(IV) is a therapy that delivers liquid substances directly into a vein (intra- + ven- + -ous). The intravenous route of administration can be used for injections (with a syringe at higher pressures) or infusions (typically using only the pressure supplied by gravity). Intravenous infusions are commonly referred to as drips
[...More...]

picture info

Chemical Formula
A chemical formula is a way of presenting information about the chemical proportions of atoms that constitute a particular chemical compound or molecule, using chemical element symbols, numbers, and sometimes also other symbols, such as parentheses, dashes, brackets, commas and plus (+) and minus (−) signs. These are limited to a single typographic line of symbols, which may include subscripts and superscripts. A chemical formula is not a chemical name, and it contains no words. Although a chemical formula may imply certain simple chemical structures, it is not the same as a full chemical structural formula. Chemical formulas can fully specify the structure of only the simplest of molecules and chemical substances, and are generally more limited in power than are chemical names and structural formulas. The simplest types of chemical formulas are called empirical formulas, which use letters and numbers indicating the numerical proportions of atoms of each type
[...More...]

picture info

Headache
Headache
Headache
is the symptom of pain anywhere in the region of the head or neck. It occurs in migraines (sharp, or throbbing pains), tension-type headaches, and cluster headaches.[1] Frequent headaches can affect relationships and employment.[1] There is also an increased risk of depression in those with severe headaches.[1] Headaches can occur as a result of many conditions whether serious or not. There are a number of different classification systems for headaches. The most well-recognized is that of the International Headache
Headache
Society. Causes of headaches may include fatigue, sleep deprivation, stress, the effects of medications, the effects of recreational drugs, viral infections, loud noises, common colds, head injury, rapid ingestion of a very cold food or beverage, and dental or sinus issues. Treatment of a headache depends on the underlying cause, but commonly involves pain medication
[...More...]

Low Blood Pressure
Hypotension is low blood pressure, especially in the arteries of the systemic circulation.[1] Blood pressure
Blood pressure
is the force of blood pushing against the walls of the arteries as the heart pumps out blood. A systolic blood pressure of less than 90 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) or diastolic of less than 60 mm Hg is generally considered to be hypotension.[2][3] However, in practice, blood pressure is considered too low only if noticeable symptoms are present.[4] Hypotension is the opposite of hypertension, which is high blood pressure. It is best understood as a physiological state, rather than a disease
[...More...]

picture info

Pregnancy
Pregnancy, also known as gestation, is the time during which one or more offspring develops inside a woman.[4] A multiple pregnancy involves more than one offspring, such as with twins.[13] Pregnancy
Pregnancy
can occur by sexual intercourse or assisted reproductive technology.[6] Childbirth
[...More...]

.