HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Nihilism
Related concepts and fundamentals:Agnosticism Epistemology Presupposition Probabilityv t e Nihilism
Nihilism
(/ˈnaɪ(h)ɪlɪzəm, ˈniː-/; from Latin nihil, meaning 'nothing') is the philosophical viewpoint that suggests the denial or lack of belief towards the reputedly meaningful aspects of life
[...More...]

"Nihilism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Paul Merwart
Paul Merwart, or Paweł Merwart (25 March 1855, Marianivka, Kherson Governorate, Ukraine - 8 May 1902, Saint-Pierre, Martinique) was a French-Polish illustrator and painter; mostly of portraits and genre scenes, inspired by the literature, the Bible and music. Biography[edit] His mother was Polish and his father was a French soldier who was serving in the Crimean War. He was raised in Lwów, then Poland, now Ukraine. At first, he studied technical subjects in Graz. After being wounded in a duel, he went to recuperate in Italy.[1] While there, he decided to pursue an artistic career instead. He began his studies in Vienna and Munich (1876), then went to Düsseldorf (1877), and finally to Paris, where he enrolled at the École des Beaux-Arts (1877–1884), completing his studies with Henri Lehmann and Isidore Pils.[1] He had his first showing at the Salon in 1879. During his time there, he worked for Le Monde Illustré, L'Illustration and L'Univers illustré
[...More...]

"Paul Merwart" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Theism
Theism
Theism
is broadly defined as the belief in the existence of the Supreme Being
Supreme Being
or deities.[1][2] In common parlance, or when contrasted with deism, the term often describes the classical conception of God that is found in monotheism (also referred to as classical theism) or gods found in polytheistic religions—a belief in God
God
or in gods without the rejection of revelation as is characteristic of deism. [3][4] Atheism
Atheism
is commonly understood as rejection of theism in the broadest sense of theism, i.e
[...More...]

"Theism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jean Baudrillard
Jean Baudrillard
Jean Baudrillard
(/ˌboʊdriːˈɑːr/; French: [ʒɑ̃ bodʁijaʁ]; 27 July 1929 – 6 March 2007) was a French sociologist, philosopher, cultural theorist, political commentator, and photographer. He is best known for his analyses of media, contemporary culture, and technological communication, as well as his formulation of concepts such as simulation and hyperreality. He wrote about diverse subjects, including consumerism, gender relations, economics, social history, art, Western foreign policy, and popular culture. Among his best known works are Simulacra and Simulation
Simulation
(1981), America (1986), and The Gulf War Did Not Take Place
The Gulf War Did Not Take Place
(1991)
[...More...]

"Jean Baudrillard" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Theology
Theology
Theology
is the critical study of the nature of the divine
[...More...]

"Theology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Latin Language
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
[...More...]

"Latin Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Modernity
Modernity, a topic in the humanities and social sciences, is both a historical period (the modern era), as well as the ensemble of particular socio-cultural norms, attitudes and practices that arose in the wake of Renaissance, in the "Age of Reason" of 17th-century thought and the 18th-century "Enlightenment". While it includes a wide range of interrelated historical processes and cultural phenomena (from fashion to modern warfare), it can also refer to the subjective or existential experience of the conditions they produce, and their ongoing impact on human culture, institutions, and politics (Berman 2010, 15–36). Depending on the field, "modernity" may refer to different time periods or qualities
[...More...]

"Modernity" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Doctrine
Doctrine (from Latin: doctrina) is a codification of beliefs or a body of teachings or instructions, taught principles or positions, as the essence of teachings in a given branch of knowledge or belief system. The Greek analogue is the etymology of catechism.[1] Often doctrine specifically suggests a body of religious principles as it is promulgated by a church, but not necessarily; doctrine is also used to refer to a principle of law, in the common law traditions, established through a history of past decisions, such as the doctrine of self-defense, or the principle of fair use, or the more narrowly applicable first-sale doctrine
[...More...]

"Doctrine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Psychosis
Psychosis
Psychosis
is an abnormal condition of the mind that results in difficulties telling what is real and what is not.[4] Symptoms may include false beliefs and seeing or hearing things that others do not see or hear.[4] Other symptoms may include incoherent speech and behavior that is inappropriate for the situation.[4] There may also be sleep problems, social withdrawal, lack of motivation, and difficulties carrying out daily activities.[4]
[...More...]

"Psychosis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Possible World
In philosophy and logic, the concept of a possible world is used to express modal claims. The concept of possible worlds is common in contemporary philosophical discourse but has been disputed.Contents1 Possibility, necessity, and contingency 2 Formal semantics of modal logics 3 From modal logic to philosophical tool 4 Possible-world theory in literary studies 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksPossibility, necessity, and contingency[edit] Further information: Modal logic § The ontology of possibility Those theorists who use the concept of possible worlds consider the actual world to be one of the many possible worlds. For each distinct way the world could have been, there is said to be a distinct possible world; the actual world is the one we in fact live in
[...More...]

"Possible World" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Intrinsic Value (ethics)
Instrumental and intrinsic value are technical labels for two poles of an ancient dichotomy. People seem to reason differently about what they ought to do, seeking legitimate ends, and what they are able to do, seeking efficient means. When reasoning about ends, they apply the criterion intrinsic value. It identifies legitimate rules of behavior, such as the Ten Commandments and the Second Amendment to the U.S. constitution. When reasoning about means they apply the criterion instrumental value. It identifies efficient tools, such as scientific and technological theories. Few question the existence of these two criteria, but their relative authority is in constant dispute. This article explains the meaning of and disputes about these two criteria for judging means and ends. Evidence is drawn from the work of four scholars
[...More...]

"Intrinsic Value (ethics)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Futurism
Futurism
Futurism
(Italian: Futurismo) was an artistic and social movement that originated in Italy
Italy
in the early 20th century. It emphasized speed, technology, youth, and violence, and objects such as the car, the aeroplane, and the industrial city. Although it was largely an Italian phenomenon, there were parallel movements in Russia, England, Belgium and elsewhere
[...More...]

"Futurism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Postmodernity
Postmodernity (post-modernity or the postmodern condition) is the economic or cultural state or condition of society which is said to exist after modernity. Some schools of thought hold that modernity ended in the late 20th century – in the 1980s or early 1990s – and that it was replaced by postmodernity, while others would extend modernity to cover the developments denoted by postmodernity, while some believe that modernity ended after World War II. The idea of the post-modern condition is sometimes characterised as a culture stripped of its capacity to function in any linear or autonomous state as opposed to the progressive mindstate of Modernism.[1] Postmodernity can mean a personal response to a postmodern society, the conditions in a society which make it postmodern or the state of being that is associated with a postmodern society as well a historical epoch
[...More...]

"Postmodernity" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Nihilist (other)
A nihilist is person who believes in nihilism, that existence has no objective meaning, purpose, or intrinsic value
[...More...]

"Nihilist (other)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Agnosticism
Related concepts and fundamentals:Agnosticism Epistemology Presupposition Probabilityv t e Agnosticism
Agnosticism
is the view that the existence of God, of the divine or the supernatural is unknown or unknowable.[1][2][3] According to the philosopher William L. Rowe, "agnosticism is the view that human reason is incapable of providing sufficient rational grounds to justify either the belief that God
God
exists or the belief that God
God
does not exist".[2] Agnosticism
Agnosticism
is the doctrine or tenet of agnostics with regard to the existence of anything beyond and behind material phenomena or to knowledge of a First Cause or God,[4] and is not a religion. English biologist Thomas Henry Huxley
Thomas Henry Huxley
coined the word "agnostic" in 1869
[...More...]

"Agnosticism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Anti-realism
In analytic philosophy, anti-realism is an epistemological position first articulated by British philosopher Michael Dummett. The term was coined as an argument against a form of realism Dummett saw as 'colorless reductionism'.[1] In anti-realism, the truth of a statement rests on its demonstrability through internal logic mechanisms, such as Frege's context principle and Heyting's intuitionistic logic, in direct opposition to the realist notion that the truth of a statement rests on its correspondence to an external, independent reality.[2] In anti-realism, this external reality is hypothetical and is not assumed.[3][4] Because it encompasses statements containing abstract ideal objects (i.e
[...More...]

"Anti-realism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.