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New York Stock Exchange
nyse.comNew York Stock
Stock
ExchangeU.S. National Register of Historic PlacesU.S. National Historic LandmarkNYC LandmarkFront Elevation of the New York Stock
Stock
Exchange.Show map of Lower ManhattanShow map of New YorkShow map of the USCoordinates 40°42′24.6″N 74°0′39.7″W / 40.706833°N 74.011028°W / 40.706833; -74.011028Coordinates: 40°42′24.6″N 74°0′39.7″W / 40.706833°N 74.011028°W / 40.706833; -74.011028Built 1903Architect Trowbridge & Livingston; George B. PostArchitectural style Classical RevivalNRHP reference # 78001877Significant datesAdded to NRHP June 2, 1978[4]Designated NHL June 2, 1978[5]Designated NYCL July 9, 1985The New York Stock
Stock
Exchange (abbreviated as NYSE and nicknamed "The Big Board"),[6] is an American stock exchange located at 11 Wall Street, Lower Manhattan, New York City, New York
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Trading Room
A trading room gathers traders operating on financial markets. The trading room is also often called the front office. The terms "dealing room" and "trading floor" are also used, the latter being inspired from that of an open outcry stock exchange. As open outcry is gradually replaced by electronic trading, the trading room gets the only living place that is emblematic of the financial market. It is also the likeliest place within the financial institution where the most recent technologies are implemented before being disseminated in its other businesses. Trading rooms are also known as "trading labs" or "finance labs" in universities and business schools
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Bond (finance)
In finance, a bond is an instrument of indebtedness of the bond issuer to the holders. The most common types of bonds include municipal bonds and corporate bonds. The bond is a debt security, under which the issuer owes the holders a debt and (depending on the terms of the bond) is obliged to pay them interest (the coupon) or to repay the principal at a later date, termed the maturity date.[1] Interest
Interest
is usually payable at fixed intervals (semiannual, annual, sometimes monthly). Very often the bond is negotiable, that is, the ownership of the instrument can be transferred in the secondary market. This means that once the transfer agents at the bank medallion stamp the bond, it is highly liquid on the secondary market.[2] Thus a bond is a form of loan or IOU: the holder of the bond is the lender (creditor), the issuer of the bond is the borrower (debtor), and the coupon is the interest
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Great Depression
The Great Depression
Great Depression
was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression
Great Depression
varied across nations; in most countries it started in 1929 and lasted until the late-1930s.[1] It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century.[2] In the 21st century, the Great Depression
Great Depression
is commonly used as an example of how far the world's economy can decline.[3] The Great Depression
Great Depression
started in the United States
United States
after a major fall in stock prices that began around September 4, 1929, and became worldwide news with the stock market crash of October 29, 1929 (known as Black Tuesday). Between 1929 and 1932, worldwide gross domestic product (GDP) fell by an estimated 15%
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Classical Revival
Neoclassicism
Neoclassicism
(from Greek νέος nèos, "new" and Latin
Latin
classicus, "of the highest rank")[1] is the name given to Western movements in the decorative and visual arts, literature, theatre, music, and architecture that draw inspiration from the "classical" art and culture of classical antiquity. Neoclassicism
Neoclassicism
was born in Rome
Rome
in the mid-18th century, at the time of the rediscovery of Pompeii
Pompeii
and Herculaneum, but its popularity spread all over Europe as a generation of European art students finished their Grand Tour
Grand Tour
and returned from Italy to their home countries with newly rediscovered Greco-Roman ideals.[2][3] The main Neoclassical movement coincided with the 18th-century Age of Enlightenment, and continued into the early 19th century, laterally competing with Romanticism
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First Bank Of The United States
The President, Directors and Company, of the Bank of the United States, commonly known as the First Bank of the United States, was a national bank, chartered for a term of twenty years, by the United States Congress on February 25, 1791. It followed the Bank of North America, the nation's first de facto central bank. Establishment of the Bank of the United States was part of a three-part expansion of federal fiscal and monetary power, along with a federal mint and excise taxes, championed by Alexander Hamilton, first Secretary of the Treasury
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission
Coordinates: 40°42′47″N 74°00′14″W / 40.71295°N 74.00377°W / 40.71295; -74.00377The demolition of Pennsylvania Station was a key moment in the preservationist movement, which led to the creation of the CommissionThe New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission
New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission
(LPC) is the New York City agency charged with administering the city's Landmarks Preservation Law. The Commission was created in April 1965 by Mayor Robert F. Wagner, Jr.[1] following the destruction of Pennsylvania Station the previous year to make way for the construction of the current Madison Square Garden. The Commission is responsible for protecting New York City's architecturally, historically, and culturally significant buildings and sites by granting them landmark or historic district status, and regulating them once they're designated
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National Historic Landmark
A National Historic Landmark
National Historic Landmark
(NHL) is a building, district, object, site, or structure that is officially recognized by the United States government for its outstanding historical significance. Of over 90,000 places listed on the country's National Register of Historic Places, only some 2,500 are recognized as National Historic Landmarks. A National Historic Landmark
National Historic Landmark
District may include contributing properties that are buildings, structures, sites or objects, and it may include non-contributing properties
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National Register Of Historic Places
The National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
(NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property. The passage of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) in 1966 established the National Register and the process for adding properties to it. Of the more than one million properties on the National Register, 80,000 are listed individually
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Electrical Telegraph
Electricity
Electricity
is the set of physical phenomena associated with the presence and motion of electric charge. Although initially considered a phenomenon separate from magnetism, since the development of Maxwell's equations, both are recognized as part of a single phenomenon: electromagnetism. Various common phenomena are related to electricity, including lightning, static electricity, electric heating, electric discharges and many others. The presence of an electric charge, which can be either positive or negative, produces an electric field. The movement of electric charges is an electric current and produces a magnetic field. When a charge is placed in a location with a non-zero electric field, a force will act on it. The magnitude of this force is given by Coulomb's law. Thus, if that charge were to move, the electric field would be doing work on the electric charge
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Open Board Of Stock Brokers
A broker is an individual person who arranges transactions between a buyer and a seller for a commission when the deal is executed. A broker who also acts as a seller or as a buyer becomes a principal party to the deal. Neither role should be confused with that of an agent—one who acts on behalf of a principal party in a deal.[1]Contents1 Definition 2 Etymology 3 Types of brokers 4 References 5 External linksDefinition[edit] A broker is an independent party, whose services are used extensively in some industries. A broker's prime responsibility is to bring sellers and buyers together and thus a broker is the third-person facilitator between a buyer and a seller. An example would be a real estate broker who facilitates the sale of a property.[1] Brokers also can furnish market information regarding prices, products, and market conditions. Brokers may represent either the seller or the buyer but not both at the same time
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10^12
This list contains selected positive numbers in increasing order, including counts of things, dimensionless quantity and probabilities. Each number is given a name in the short scale, which is used in English-speaking countries, as well as a name in the long scale, which is used in some of the countries that do not have English as their national language.Contents1 Smaller than 10−100 (one googolth) 2 10−100 to 10−30 3 10−30 4 10−27 5 10−24 6 10−21 7 10−18 8 10−15 9 10−12 10 10−9 11 10−6 12 10−3 13 10−2 14 10−1 15 100 16 101 17 102 18 103 19 104 20 105 21 106 22 107 23 108 24 109 25 1010 26 1011 27 1012 28 1015 29 1018 30 1021 31 1024 32 1027 33 1030 34 1033 35 1036 36 1039 37 1042 to 10100 38 10100 (one googol) to 1010100 (one googolplex) 39 Larger than 1010100 40 See also 41 References 42 External linksSmaller than 10−100 (one googolth)[edit]Mathematics – Numbers: The number zero is a natural, even number which quantif
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American Civil War
Union victoryDissolution of the Confederate States U.S. territorial integrity preserved Slavery abolished Beginning of the Reconstruction EraBelligerents United States  Confederate StatesCommanders and leaders Abraham Lincoln Ulysses S. Grant William T. Sherman David Farragut George B. McClellan Henry Halleck George Meade and others Jefferson Davis Robert E. Lee  J. E. Johnston  G. T. Beauregard  A. S
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United States Dollar
 United States  East Timor[2][Note 1]  Ecuador[3][Note 2]  El Salvador[4]  Federated States of Micronesia  Marshall Islands  Palau  Panama[Note 3]  Zimbabwe[Note 4]3 non-U.S
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Chairman
The chairman (also chairperson, chairwoman or chair) is the highest officer of an organized group such as a board, a committee, or a deliberative assembly. The person holding the office is typically elected or appointed by the members of the group. The chairman presides over meetings of the assembled group and conducts its business in an orderly fashion.[1] When the group is not in session, the officer's duties often include acting as its head, its representative to the outside world and its spokesperson
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