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New York Stock Exchange
nyse.com New York Stock
Stock
Exchange U.S. National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
U.S. National Historic Landmark
National Historic Landmark
NYC Landmark Front Elevation of the New York Stock
Stock
Exchange. Show map of Lower Manhattan Show map of New York Show map of the US COORDINATES 40°42′24.6″N 74°0′39.7″W / 40.706833°N 74.011028°W / 40.706833; -74.011028 Coordinates : 40°42′24.6″N 74°0′39.7″W / 40.706833°N 74.011028°W / 40.706833; -74.011028 BUILT 1903 ARCHITECT Trowbridge George B
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New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission
Coordinates : 40°42′47″N 74°00′14″W / 40.71295°N 74.00377°W / 40.71295; -74.00377 The demolition of Pennsylvania Station was a key moment in the preservationist movement , which led to the creation of the Commission The NEW YORK CITY LANDMARKS PRESERVATION COMMISSION (LPC) is the New York City agency charged with administering the city's Landmarks Preservation Law. The Commission was created in April 1965 by Mayor Robert F. Wagner, Jr. following the destruction of Pennsylvania Station the previous year to make way for the construction of the current Madison Square Garden . The Commission is responsible for protecting New York City's architecturally, historically, and culturally significant buildings and sites by granting them landmark or historic district status, and regulating them once they're designated. It is the largest municipal preservation agency in the nation
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National Historic Landmark
A NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARK (NHL) is a building, district, object, site, or structure that is officially recognized by the United States government for its outstanding historical significance. Of over 90,000 places listed on the country's National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
, only some 2,500 are recognized as National Historic Landmarks. A NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARK DISTRICT may include contributing properties that are buildings, structures, sites or objects, and it may include non-contributing properties. Contributing properties may or may not also be separately listed
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National Register Of Historic Places
The NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES (NRHP) is the United States federal government 's official list of districts , sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property. The passage of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) in 1966 established the National Register and the process for adding properties to it. Of the more than one million properties on the National Register, 80,000 are listed individually. The remainder are contributing resources within historic districts . For most of its history the National Register has been administered by the National Park Service
National Park Service
(NPS), an agency within the United States Department of the Interior
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Trading Room
A TRADING ROOM gathers traders operating on financial markets . The trading room is also often called the front office . The terms "dealing room" and "trading floor " are also used, the latter being inspired from that of an open outcry stock exchange . As open outcry is gradually replaced by electronic trading , the trading room gets the only living place that is emblematic of the financial market. It is also the likeliest place within the financial institution where the most recent technologies are implemented before being disseminated in its other businesses . Trading rooms are also known as "trading labs" or "finance labs" in universities and business schools. Trading rooms, have become a key medium in creating a "wall street atmosphere"
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Geographic Coordinate System
A GEOGRAPHIC COORDINATE SYSTEM is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position , and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position . A common choice of coordinates is latitude , longitude and elevation . To specify a location on a two-dimensional map requires a map projection
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First Bank Of The United States
THE PRESIDENT, DIRECTORS AND COMPANY, OF THE BANK OF THE UNITED STATES, commonly known as the FIRST BANK OF THE UNITED STATES, was a national bank , chartered for a term of twenty years, by the United States Congress on February 25, 1791. It followed the Bank of North America , the nation's first de facto central bank . Establishment of the Bank of the United States was part of a three-part expansion of federal fiscal and monetary power, along with a federal mint and excise taxes, championed by Alexander Hamilton
Alexander Hamilton
, first Secretary of the Treasury . Hamilton believed a national bank was necessary to stabilize and improve the nation's credit, and to improve handling of the financial business of the United States government under the newly enacted Constitution
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Bond (finance)
In finance , a BOND is an instrument of indebtedness of the bond issuer to the holders. The most common types of bonds include municipal bonds and corporate bonds . The bond is a debt security , under which the issuer owes the holders a debt and (depending on the terms of the bond) is obliged to pay them interest (the coupon ) and/or to repay the principal at a later date, termed the maturity date. Interest is usually payable at fixed intervals (semiannual, annual, sometimes monthly). Very often the bond is negotiable, that is, the ownership of the instrument can be transferred in the secondary market. This means that once the transfer agents at the bank medallion stamp the bond, it is highly liquid on the second market. Thus a bond is a form of loan or IOU
IOU
: the holder of the bond is the lender (creditor), the issuer of the bond is the borrower (debtor), and the coupon is the interest
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Great Depression
The GREAT DEPRESSION was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, originating in the United States . The timing of the Great Depression
Great Depression
varied across nations; in most countries it started in 1929 and lasted until 1941. It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century. In the 21st century, the Great Depression
Great Depression
is commonly used as an example of how far the world's economy can decline. The depression started in the United States after a major fall in stock prices that began around September 4, 1929, and became worldwide news with the stock market crash of October 29, 1929 (known as Black Tuesday ). Between 1929 and 1932, worldwide gross domestic product (GDP) fell by an estimated 15%. By comparison, worldwide GDP fell by less than 1% from 2008 to 2009 during the Great Recession
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Classical Revival
NEOCLASSICISM (from Greek νέος nèos, "new" and Latin
Latin
classicus, "of the highest rank") is the name given to Western movements in the decorative and visual arts, literature, theatre, music, and architecture that draw inspiration from the "classical" art and culture of Ancient Greece
Ancient Greece
or Ancient Rome
Ancient Rome
. Neoclassicism
Neoclassicism
was born in Rome in the mid-18th century, but its popularity spread all over Europe, as a generation of European art students finished their Grand Tour and returned from Italy to their home countries with newly rediscovered Greco-Roman ideals. The main Neoclassical movement coincided with the 18th-century Age of Enlightenment
Age of Enlightenment
, and continued into the early 19th century, laterally competing with Romanticism
Romanticism

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Open Board Of Stock Brokers
The OPEN BOARD OF STOCK BROKERS was an early regional stock exchange in the United States
United States
. It was established in 1864, to "to profit from the economic and investment boom sparked by the Civil War ." The old Open Board of Stock Brokers was located at 16 and 18 Broad Street . With 354 members, the Open Board of Stock Brokers rivaled its early competitor the NYSE
NYSE
in membership (which had 533) "because it used a more modern, continuous trading system superior to the NYSE’s twice-daily call sessions." The Open Board of Stock Brokers merged with the NYSE
NYSE
in 1869. Later in 1877, a new organization the New-York Open Board of Stock Brokers commissioned the building of the old Open Board of Stock Brokers
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Electrical Telegraph
An ELECTRICAL TELEGRAPH is a telegraph that uses electrical signals , usually conveyed via dedicated telecommunication lines or radio . The electrical telegraph, or more commonly just TELEGRAPH, superseded optical semaphore telegraph systems , thus becoming the first form of electrical telecommunications . In a matter of decades after their creation in the 1830s, electrical telegraph networks permitted people and commerce to transmit messages across both continents and oceans almost instantly, with widespread social and economic impacts
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10^12
This list contains selected positive numbers in increasing order, including counts of things, dimensionless quantity and probabilities . Each number is given a name in the short scale , which is used in English-speaking countries, as well as a name in the long scale , which is used in some of the countries that do not have English as their national language
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Owner
OWNERSHIP of property may be private, collective, or common, and the property may be of objects , land or real estate , or intellectual property . Determining ownership in law involves determining who has certain rights and duties over the property. These rights and duties, sometimes called a "bundle of rights", can be separated and held by different parties. The process and mechanics of ownership are fairly complex: one can gain, transfer, and lose ownership of property in a number of ways. To acquire property one can purchase it with money, trade it for other property, win it in a bet, receive it as a gift , inherit it, find it, receive it as damages , earn it by doing work or performing services, make it, or homestead it. One can transfer or lose ownership of property by selling it for money , exchanging it for other property, giving it as a gift, misplacing it, or having it stripped from one's ownership through legal means such as eviction , foreclosure , seizure , or taking
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Wall Street Crash Of 1929
A STREET is a public thoroughfare (usually paved) in a built environment. It is a public parcel of land adjoining buildings in an urban context, on which people may freely assemble, interact, and move about. A street can be as simple as a level patch of dirt , but is more often paved with a hard, durable surface such as concrete , cobblestone or brick . Portions may also be smoothed with asphalt , embedded with rails , or otherwise prepared to accommodate non-pedestrian traffic. Originally the word "street" simply meant a paved road (Latin: "via strata"). The word "street" is still sometimes used colloquially as a synonym for "road ", for example in connection with the ancient Watling Street
Watling Street
, but city residents and urban planners draw a crucial modern distinction: a road's main function is transportation, while streets facilitate public interaction
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Black Monday (1987)
In finance , BLACK MONDAY refers to Monday, October 19, 1987, when stock markets around the world crashed , shedding a huge value in a very short time. The crash began in Hong Kong
Hong Kong
and spread west to Europe, hitting the United States after other markets had already declined by a significant margin. The Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) fell exactly 508 points to 1,738.74 (22.61%). In Australia and New Zealand, the 1987 crash is also referred to as "BLACK TUESDAY" because of the time zone difference. The terms Black Monday and Black Tuesday are also respectively applied to October 28 and October 29, 1929, which occurred after Black Thursday on October 24, which started the Stock Market Crash of 1929 . CONTENTS * 1 Timeline * 2 Market effects * 3 Causes * 4 Regulation * 5 See also * 6 References * 7 Further reading * 8 External links TIMELINE Timeline compiled by the Federal Reserve
Federal Reserve

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