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New York State Assembly
Majority caucus (104)     Democratic (103)      Independence (1)Minority caucus (37)     Republican (37)Vacant (9)     Vacant (9)Length of term2 yearsAuthority Article III, New York ConstitutionSalary $79,500/year + per diemElectionsLast electionNovember 8, 2016 (150 seats)Next electionNovember 6, 2018 (150 seats)Redistricting Legislative ControlMeeting placeState Assembly Chamber New York State Capitol Albany, New YorkWebsiteNew York State AssemblyThe New York State Assembly
New York State Assembly
is the lower house of the New York State Legislature, the New York State Senate
New York State Senate
being the upper house. There are 150 seats in the Assembly, with each of the 150 Assembly districts having an average population of 128,652
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United States Republican Party
Republican can refer to:An advocate of a republic, a form of government that is not a monarchy or dictatorship, and is usually associated with the rule of lawRepublicanism, the ideology in support of republics or against monarchy; the opposite of monarchism Republicanism
Republicanism
in Australia Republicanism
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Albany, NY
Albany (/ˈɔːlbəni/ ( listen) AWL-bə-nee) is the capital of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of New York and the seat of Albany County. Roughly 150 miles (240 km) north of New York City, Albany developed on the west bank of the Hudson River, about 10 miles (16 km) south of its confluence with the Mohawk River. The population of the City of Albany was 97,856 according to the 2010 census. Albany constitutes the economic and cultural core of the Capital District of New York State, which comprises the Albany-Schenectady-Troy, NY Metropolitan Statistical Area, including the nearby cities and suburbs of Troy, Schenectady, and Saratoga Springs. With a 2013 Census-estimated population of 1.1 million [6] the Capital District is the third-most populous metropolitan region in the state and 38th in the United States.[7][8] Albany was the first European settlement in New York State
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Central New York
Central New York
Central New York
is the central region of New York State, roughly including the following counties and cities:Cayuga County – AuburnCortland County – CortlandHerkimer County – Little FallsMadison County – OneidaOneida County – Rome, Sherrill (smallest city in New York) and UticaOnondaga County – Syracuse (largest city in the region)Oswego County – Fulton and OswegoTompkins County – IthacaUnder this definition, the region has a population of about 1,177,073, and includes the Syracuse metropolitan area
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Western New York
Western New York
Western New York
is the westernmost region of the state of New York. It includes the cities of Buffalo, Rochester, Niagara Falls, the surrounding suburbs, as well as the outlying rural areas of the Great Lakes lowlands, the Genesee Valley, and the Southern Tier
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Democratic Party (United States)
The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Republican Party (GOP). Tracing its heritage back to Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson
and James Madison's Democratic-Republican Party, the modern-day Democratic Party was founded around 1828 by supporters of Andrew Jackson, making it the world's oldest political party.[16] The Democrats' dominant worldview was once social conservatism and economic liberalism while populism was its leading characteristic in the rural South. In 1912, Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
ran as a third-party candidate in the Progressive ("Bull Moose") Party, leading to a switch of political platforms between the Democratic and Republican Party and Woodrow Wilson
Woodrow Wilson
being elected as the first fiscally progressive Democrat. Since Franklin D. Roosevelt
Franklin D

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Seneca County, New York
Seneca County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York. As of the 2010 census, the population was 35,251.[1] The primary county seat is Waterloo, moved there from the original county seat of Ovid in 1819.[2][3] It became a two-shire county in 1822, which currently remains in effect, using both locations as county seats although the majority of Seneca County administrative offices are located in Waterloo.[4][5] Therefore, most political sources only list Waterloo as the county seat
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Lower House
A lower house is one of two chambers of a bicameral legislature, the other chamber being the upper house.[1] Despite its official position "below" the upper house, in many legislatures worldwide, the lower house has come to wield more power. The lower house typically is the more numerous of the two chambers
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Williamsbridge, Bronx
Williamsbridge is a neighborhood geographically located in the north central Bronx borough of New York City in the United States. The neighborhood is part of Bronx Community Board 12. Its boundaries, starting from the north and moving clockwise are: East 222nd Street to the north, Boston Road to the east, East Gun Hill Road to the south, and the Bronx River to the west. White Plains Road is the primary thoroughfare through Williamsbridge. ZIP codes include 10466, 10467, and 10469. The area is patrolled by the 47th Precinct located at 4111 Laconia Avenue. New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) property in the area is patrolled by P.S.A
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Wakefield, Bronx
Wakefield is a working-class and middle-class section of the northern borough of the Bronx in New York City, bounded by the New York city line with Westchester County
Westchester County
or 243rd street to the north, 222nd Street to the south, and the Bronx River, Bronx River
Bronx River
Parkway and Metro-North Railroad
Metro-North Railroad
tracks to the west. Wakefield is the northernmost neighborhood in New York City
City
(although the city's northernmost point is actually in Riverdale, at the College of Mount Saint Vincent)
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United States Democratic Party
The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Republican Party (GOP). Tracing its heritage back to Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson
and James Madison's Democratic-Republican Party, the modern-day Democratic Party was founded around 1828 by supporters of Andrew Jackson, making it the world's oldest political party.[16] The Democrats' dominant worldview was once social conservatism and economic liberalism while populism was its leading characteristic in the rural South. In 1912, Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
ran as a third-party candidate in the Progressive ("Bull Moose") Party, leading to a switch of political platforms between the Democratic and Republican Party and Woodrow Wilson
Woodrow Wilson
being elected as the first fiscally progressive Democrat. Since Franklin D. Roosevelt
Franklin D

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Albany, New York
Albany (/ˈɔːlbəni/ ( listen) AWL-bə-nee) is the capital of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of New York and the seat of Albany County. Roughly 150 miles (240 km) north of New York City, Albany developed on the west bank of the Hudson River, about 10 miles (16 km) south of its confluence with the Mohawk River. The population of the City of Albany was 97,856 according to the 2010 census. Albany constitutes the economic and cultural core of the Capital District of New York State, which comprises the Albany-Schenectady-Troy, NY Metropolitan Statistical Area, including the nearby cities and suburbs of Troy, Schenectady, and Saratoga Springs. With a 2013 Census-estimated population of 1.1 million [6] the Capital District is the third-most populous metropolitan region in the state and 38th in the United States.[7][8] Albany was the first European settlement in New York State
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Suffolk County, New York
Suffolk County /ˈsʌfək/ is a suburban county on Long Island and the easternmost county in the U.S. state of New York. As of the 2010 census, the county's population was 1,493,350, estimated to have decreased slightly to 1,492,953 in 2017,[1] making it the fourth-most populous county in New York. Its county seat is Riverhead,[2] though most county offices are located in Hauppauge.[3] The county was named after the county of Suffolk in England, from where its earliest European settlers came. Suffolk County incorporates the easternmost extreme of the New York City metropolitan area
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Upper House
An upper house, sometimes called a senate, is one of two chambers of a bicameral legislature (or one of three chambers of a tricameral legislature), the other chamber being the lower house.[1] The house formally designated as the upper house is usually smaller and often has more restricted power than the lower house
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Term Limits In The United States
Term limits in the United States
United States
apply to many offices at both the federal and state level, and date back to the American Revolution. Term limits, also referred to as rotation in office, restrict the number of terms of office an officeholder may hold.This article is part of a series on thePolitics of the United States
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Minority Leader
In U.S. politics, the minority leader is the floor leader of the second largest caucus in a legislative body.[1] Given the two-party nature of the U.S. system, the minority leader is almost inevitably either a Republican or a Democrat. The position could be considered similar to that of the Leader of the Opposition in Parliamentary systems. In bicameral legislatures, the counterpart to the minority leader in the lower house is the Speaker, and the majority leader is hence only the second-most senior member of the majority caucus. Contrastingly, in upper houses the titular Speaker is frequently a separately elected officer such as a lieutenant governor or vice president. The minority leader is often assisted in his/her role by one or more whips, whose job is to enforce party discipline on votes deemed to be crucial by the party leadership and to ensure that members do not vote against the position of the party leaders
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