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New York Philharmonic
The New York Philharmonic, officially the Philharmonic-Symphony Society of New York, Inc.,[1] globally known as New York Philharmonic Orchestra
Orchestra
(NYPO)[2][3][4][5] or New York Philharmonic-Symphony Orchestra,[6][7] is a symphony orchestra based in New York City
New York City
in the United States. It is one of the leading American orchestras popularly referred to as the "Big Five".[8] The Philharmonic's home is David Geffen Hall, located in New York's Lincoln Center
Lincoln Center
for the Performing Arts.[9] Founded in 1842, the orchestra is one of the oldest musical institutions in the United States and the oldest of the "Big Five" orchestras
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Piotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
(/ˈɪljɪtʃ tʃaɪˈkɒfski/ IL-yitch chy-KOF-skee;[1] Russian: Пётр Ильи́ч Чайко́вский;[a 1] 25 April/7 May 1840 – 25 October/6 November 1893),[a 2] often anglicized as Peter Ilich Tchaikovsky, was a Russian composer of the romantic period, some of whose works are among the most popular music in the classical repertoire. He was the first Russian composer whose music made a lasting impression internationally, bolstered by his appearances as a guest conductor in Europe and the United States. Tchaikovsky was honored in 1884 by Emperor Alexander III, and awarded a lifetime pension. Although musically precocious, Tchaikovsky was educated for a career as a civil servant. There was scant opportunity for a musical career in Russia at that time and no system of public music education
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Ode To Joy
" Ode to Joy" (German: "An die Freude" [an diː ˈfʁɔʏdə]), is an ode written in the summer of 1785 by German poet, playwright, and historian Friedrich Schiller
Friedrich Schiller
and published the following year in Thalia. A slightly revised version appeared in 1808, changing two lines of the first and omitting the last stanza. " Ode to Joy" is best known for its use by Ludwig van Beethoven
Ludwig van Beethoven
in the final (fourth) movement of his Ninth Symphony, completed in 1824. Beethoven's text is not based entirely on Schiller's poem, and introduces a few new sections
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Franz Liszt
Franz Liszt
Franz Liszt
(German pronunciation: [ˈfʁants ˈlɪst]; Hungarian: Liszt Ferencz, in modern usage Liszt Ferenc, pronounced [ˈlist ˈfɛrɛnt͡s];[n 1] 22 October 1811 – 31 July 1886) was a prolific 19th-century Hungarian composer, virtuoso pianist, conductor, music teacher, arranger, organist, philanthropist, author, nationalist and a Franciscan tertiary. Liszt gained renown in Europe during the early nineteenth century for his prodigious virtuosic skill as a pianist. He was a friend, musical promoter and benefactor to many composers of his time, including Frédéric Chopin, Richard Wagner, Hector Berlioz, Robert Schumann, Camille Saint-Saëns, Edvard Grieg, Ole Bull, Joachim Raff, Mikhail Glinka, and Alexander Borodin.[1] As a composer, Liszt was one of the most prominent representatives of the New German School
New German School
(Neudeutsche Schule)
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Weimar
Weimar
Weimar
(German pronunciation: [ˈvaɪmaɐ̯]; Latin: Vimaria or Vinaria) is a city in the federal state of Thuringia, Germany. It is located between Erfurt
Erfurt
in the west and Jena
Jena
in the east, approximately 80 kilometres (50 miles) southwest of Leipzig, 170 kilometres (106 miles) north of Nuremberg
Nuremberg
and 170 kilometres (106 miles) west of Dresden
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Castle Garden
Castle Clinton or Fort Clinton, previously known as Castle Garden, is a circular sandstone fort now located in Battery Park, in Manhattan, New York City. It is perhaps best remembered as America's first immigration station (predating Ellis Island), where more than 8 million people arrived in the United States from 1855 to 1890. Over its active life, it has also functioned as a beer garden, exhibition hall, theater, and public aquarium, and currently is a national monument.Contents1 Historic use 2 19th century 3 Immigration holding center 4 20th century to present 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksHistoric use[edit] Castle Clinton stands approximately two blocks west of where Fort Amsterdam was built in 1626, when New York City was known by the Dutch name New Amsterdam. Construction began in 1808 and was completed in 1811. The fort, known as West Battery (sometimes Southwest Battery), was designed by architects John McComb, Jr. and Jonathan Williams
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Andrew Carnegie
Andrew Carnegie
Andrew Carnegie
(/kɑːrˈneɪɡi/ kar-NAY-gee, but commonly /ˈkɑːrnəɡi/ KAR-nə-ghee or /kɑːrˈnɛɡi/ kar-NEG-ee;[3] November 25, 1835 – August 11, 1919) was a Scottish-American industrialist, business magnate, and philanthropist. Carnegie led the expansion of the American steel industry in the late 19th century and is often identified as one of the richest people (and richest Americans).[4] He became a leading philanthropist in the United States and in the British Empire. During the last 18 years of his life, he gave away about $350 million[5][note 1] to charities, foundations, and universities—almost 90 percent of his fortune. His 1889 article proclaiming "The Gospel of Wealth" called on the rich to use their wealth to improve society, and stimulated a wave of philanthropy. Carnegie was born in Dunfermline, Scotland, and emigrated to the United States with his parents in 1848
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Cincinnati
Cincinnati
Cincinnati
(/ˌsɪnsɪˈnæti/ SIN-sih-NAT-ee) is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio
Ohio
and seat of Hamilton County.[7] Settled in 1788, the city was located at the north side of the confluence of the Licking River to the Ohio. The city drives the Cincinnati–Middletown–Wilmington combined statistical area, which had a population of 2,172,191 in the 2010 census.[8] With a population of 298,800, Cincinnati
Cincinnati
is the third-largest city proper in Ohio
Ohio
and the 65th-biggest in the United States. It is the fastest growing economic power in the Midwestern United States[9] and the 28th-biggest metropolitan statistical area in the United States
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Ludwig Van Beethoven
Ludwig van Beethoven
Ludwig van Beethoven
(/ˈlʊdvɪɡ væn ˈbeɪˌtoʊvən/ ( listen), /ˈbeɪtˌhoʊvən/; German: [ˈluːtvɪç fan ˈbeːtˌhoˑfn̩] ( listen); baptised 17 December 1770[1] – 26 March 1827) was a German composer and pianist. A crucial figure in the transition between the Classical and Romantic eras in Classical music, he remains one of the most famous and influential of all composers. His best-known compositions include 9 symphonies, 5 piano concertos, 1 violin concerto, 32 piano sonatas, 16 string quartets, his great Mass the Missa solemnis, and one opera, Fidelio. Born in Bonn, then the capital of the Electorate of Cologne
Electorate of Cologne
and part of the Holy Roman Empire, Beethoven displayed his musical talents at an early age and was taught by his father Johann van Beethoven
Johann van Beethoven
and by composer and conductor Christian Gottlob Neefe
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Joseph Horowitz
Joseph Horowitz (born 1948 in New York City) is an American cultural historian whose seven books mainly deal with the institutional history of classical music in the United States. As a producer of concerts, he has played a pioneering role in promoting thematic programming and new concert formats. His tenure as Artistic Advisor and, subsequently, Executive Director of the Brooklyn Philharmonic Orchestra at the Brooklyn Academy of Music (1992–1997) attracted national attention for its radical departure from traditional functions and templates. Life and work[edit] Horowitz’s books treat the late nineteenth century as the apex of American classical music, before it generated into a “culture of performance“ spotlighting celebrity conductors and instrumentalists, whom he terms “performance specialists” in contradistinction to the composer/performers of an earlier era
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Édouard Colonne
Édouard Juda Colonne (23 July 1838 – 28 March 1910) was a French conductor and violinist, who was a champion of the music of Berlioz and other eminent 19th-century composers. Life and career[edit] Colonne was born in Bordeaux, the son and grandson of musicians of Italian-Jewish descent. From the age of eight, he played flageolet and accordion, and then began violin studies with Baudoin.[1] Starting in 1855, Colonne studied at the Conservatoire in Paris, where he won first prizes in both harmony and violin. For almost a decade (1858–67) he was first violinist at the Opéra in Paris, as well as playing second violin in the Lamoureux Quartet
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Fritz Steinbach
Fritz Steinbach (17 June 1855 - 13 Aug 1916) was a German conductor and composer who was particularly associated with the works of Johannes Brahms. Born in Grünsfeld, he was the brother of conductor Emil Steinbach. He studied at the Leipzig Conservatory and in Vienna. Among his teachers were Martin Gustav Nottebohm and Anton Door. In 1886, he succeeded Richard Strauss as the conductor of the Meiningen Court Orchestra. He remained there until 1902, during which time he often collaborated with Brahms and gave frequent guest performances at the court of Georg II, Duke of Saxe-Meiningen. From 1898-1901 he was President of the Allgemeiner Deutscher Musikverein. He was the music director of the Gürzenich Orchestra in Cologne from 1902-1914. He served as the director of the Lower Rhenish Music Festival in 1904, 1907, 1910, and 1913
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Richard Strauss
Richard Georg Strauss
Strauss
(11 June 1864 – 8 September 1949) was a leading German composer of the late Romantic and early modern eras
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Felix Weingartner
Paul Felix Weingartner, Edler[1] von Münzberg (2 June 1863 – 7 May 1942) was an Austrian conductor, composer and pianist.Contents1 Life and career 2 Composer
Composer
and editor 3 Writings and interests 4 Compositions 5 References 6 Bibliography 7 External linksLife and career[edit] Weingartner was born in Zara, Dalmatia, Austria–Hungary
Austria–Hungary
(now Zadar, Croatia), to Austrian parents. The family moved to Graz
Graz
in 1868, and his father died later that year. He studied with Wilhelm Mayer (who published his own compositions under the pseudonym of W. A. Rémy and also taught Ferruccio Busoni). In 1881 he went to Leipzig
Leipzig
to study philosophy, but soon devoted himself entirely to music, entering the Conservatory in 1883 and studying in Weimar
Weimar
as one of Franz Liszt's last pupils
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New England
New England
New England
is a geographical region comprising six states of the northeastern United States: Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut.[a] It is bordered by the state of New York to the west and by the Canadian provinces of New Brunswick and Quebec
Quebec
to the northeast and north, respectively. The Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
is to the east and southeast, and Long Island Sound
Long Island Sound
is to the south. Boston
Boston
is New England's largest city as well as the capital of Massachusetts
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Abraham Lincoln
President of the United StatesPresidencyFirst term1860 campaignElection1st inaugurationAddressAmerican Civil WarThe UnionEmancipation Proclamation Ten percent plan Gettysburg Address 13th AmendmentSecond term1864 campaignElection2nd inaugurationAddressReconstructionAssassination and legacyAssassination FuneralLegacy Memorials Depictions Views on slaveryTopical guide Bibliographyv t e Abraham Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln
(February 12, 1809 
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