HOME TheInfoList
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff







picture info

New South Wales V Commonwealth (2006)

New South Wales v Commonwealth (also called the WorkChoices case)[1] is a landmark decision of the High Court of Australia, which held that the federal government's WorkChoices legislation[2] was a valid exercise of constitutional power. In essence, the majority (Gleeson CJ, Gummow, Hayne, Heydon & Crennan JJ) found the Constitution's corporations power capable of sustaining the legislative framework, while the conciliation and arbitration and territories powers were also seen as supporting parts of the law. Furthermore, the majority also held that the legislation permissibly limited State powers and did not interfere with State constitutions or functioning
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Northern Territory

The Northern Territory (NT; formally the Northern Territory of Australia[5]) is an Australian territory in the central and central northern regions of Australia. It shares borders with Western Australia to the west (129th meridian east), South Australia to the south (26th parallel south), and Queensland to the east (138th meridian east). To the north, the territory looks out to the Timor Sea, the Arafura Sea and the Gulf of Carpentaria, including Western New Guinea and other islands of the Indonesian archipelago. The NT covers 1,349,129 square kilometres (520,902 sq mi), making it the third-largest Australian federal division, and the 11th-largest country subdivision in the world
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Australian Capital Territory

The Australian Capital Territory (ACT), known as the Federal Capital Territory (FCT) until 1938, is a federal territory of Australia containing the Australian capital city of Canberra and some surrounding townships. It is located in the south-east of the country and is an enclave within the state of New South Wales. Founded after Federation as the seat of government for the new nation, all important institutions of the Australian Government are headquartered in the territory. On 1 January 1901, federation of the colonies of Australia was achieved. Section 125 of the new Australian Constitution provided that land, situated in New South Wales and at least 100 miles (160 km) from Sydney, would be ceded to the new federal government. Following discussion and exploration of various areas within New South Wales, the Seat of Government Act 1908 was passed in 1908 which specified a capital in the Yass-Canberra region
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Government Of Australia

The Australian Government is the federal government of Australia, a parliamentary constitutional monarchy, and is the first level of government division. It is also referred to as the Commonwealth Government. Like many other Westminster-style systems of government, the Australian Government is made up of three branches: the executive (the prime minister, the ministers, and government departments), the legislative (the Parliament of Australia), and the judicial. The legislative branch, the federal Parliament, is made up of two chambers: the House of Representatives (lower house) and the Senate (upper house). The House of Representatives has 151 members, each representing an individual electoral district of about 165,000 people. The Senate has 76 members: twelve from each of the six states and two each from Australia's internal territories, the Australian Capital Territory and Northern Territory
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Federation Of Australia

The Federation of Australia was the process by which the six separate British self-governing colonies of self-governing colonies of Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania, South Australia, and Western Australia agreed to unite and form the Commonwealth of Australia, establishing a system of federalism in Australia. The colonies of Fiji and New Zealand were originally part of this process, but they decided not to join the federation.[1] Following federation, the six colonies that united to form the Commonwealth of Australia as states kept the systems of government (and the bicameral legislatures) that they had developed as separate colonies, but they also agreed to have a federal government that was responsible for matters concerning the whole nation
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Australian Labor Party

The Australian Labor Party (ALP), also simply known as Labor and historically spelt Labour, is the major centre-left political party in Australian politics, and is currently in Opposition in the federal parliament. The ALP is a federal party, which political branches in each state and territory. They are currently in government in Victoria, Queensland, Western Australia, the Australian Capital Territory, and the Northern Territory. The Labor Party is the oldest political party in Australia. The ALP was not founded as a federal party until after the first sitting of the Australian parliament in 1901. Nevertheless, it is regarded as descended from labour parties founded in the various Australian colonies by the emerging labour movement in Australia, formally beginning in 1891. Colonial labour parties contested seats from 1891, and federal seats following Federation at the 1901 federal election
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Act Of Parliament
Acts of parliament, sometimes referred to as primary legislation, are texts of law passed by the legislative body of a jurisdiction (often a parliament or council).[1] In most countries, acts of parliament begin as a bill, which the legislature votes on. Depending on the structure of government, this text may then by subject to assent or approval from the executive branch. A draft Act of Parliament is known as a bill. In other words, a bill is a proposed law that needs to be discussed in the parliament before it can become a law. In territories with a Westminster system, most bills that have any possibility of becoming law are introduced into parliament by the government. This will usually happen following the publication of a "white paper", setting out the issues and the way in which the proposed new law is intended to deal with them
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]