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New Orleans Saints
National Football League
National Football League
(1967–present)Eastern Conference (1967–1969)Capitol Division (1967; 1969) Century Division (1968) National Football Conference
Natio

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All Saints Day
All Saints' Day, also known as All Hallows' Day, Hallowmas,[3][4] Feast of All Saints,[5][6] or Solemnity
Solemnity
of All Saints,[7] is a Christian festival celebrated in honour of all the saints, known and unknown. In Western Christianity, it is celebrated on 1 November by the Roman Catholic
Catholic
Church, the Anglican Communion, the Methodist Church, the Lutheran Church, and other Protestant churches
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American Football
American football, referred to as football in the United States and Canada[citation needed] and also known as gridiron,[nb 1] is a team sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field with goalposts at each end. The offense, which is the team controlling the oval-shaped football, attempts to advance down the field by running with or passing the ball, while the defense, which is the team without control of the ball, aims to stop the offense's advance and aims to take control of the ball for themselves. The offense must advance at least ten yards in four downs, or plays, and otherwise they turn over the football to the defense; if the offense succeeds in advancing ten yards or more, they are given a new set of four downs. Points are primarily scored by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown or kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal
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David Dixon (businessman)
David[a] is described in the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
as the second king of the United Kingdom of Israel and Judah. In the biblical narrative, David
David
is a young shepherd who first gains fame as a musician and later by killing Goliath. He becomes a favorite of King Saul
Saul
and a close friend of Saul's son Jonathan. Worried that David
David
is trying to take his throne, Saul
Saul
turns on David. After Saul and Jonathan are killed in battle, David
David
is anointed as King. David conquers Jerusalem, taking the Ark of the Covenant
Ark of the Covenant
into the city, and establishing the kingdom founded by Saul
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2006–07 NFL Playoffs
The playoffs, play-offs, postseason and/or finals of a sports league are a competition played after the regular season by the top competitors to determine the league champion or a similar accolade. Depending on the league, the playoffs may be either a single game, a series of games, or a tournament, and may use a single-elimination system or one of several other different playoff formats. Playoff, in regard to international fixtures, is to qualify or progress to the next round of a competition or tournament. In team sports in the U.S. and Canada, the vast distances and consequent burdens on cross-country travel have led to regional divisions of teams. Generally, during the regular season, teams play more games in their division than outside it, but the league's best teams might not play against each other in the regular season. Therefore, in the postseason a playoff series is organized
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Hurricane Katrina
Hurricane Katrina
Hurricane Katrina
was an extremely destructive and deadly tropical cyclone that is tied with Hurricane Harvey
Hurricane Harvey
of 2017 as the costliest tropical cyclone on record. Katrina was also one of the costliest natural disasters and one of the five deadliest hurricanes in the history of the United States.[3] As Katrina made landfall, its front right quadrant, which held the strongest winds, slammed into Gulfport, Mississippi, devastating it.[4] The storm originated over the Bahamas
Bahamas
on August 23, 2005, from the merger of a tropical wave and the remnants of Tropical Depression Ten. Early on the following day, the new tropical depression intensified into Tropical Storm Katrina. The tropical cyclone headed generally westward toward Florida, and strengthened into a hurricane only two hours before making landfall at Hallandale Beach and Aventura, on August 25
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Fight Song
In American and Canadian sports, a fight song is a song associated with a team. In both professional and amateur sports, fight songs are a popular way for fans to cheer for their team, and are also laden with history; in singing a fight song, fans feel part of a large, time-honored tradition.[1] Although the term "fight song" is primarily used in the United States, the use of fight songs is commonplace around the world, but they may also be referred to as team anthems, team songs or games songs in other countries, even such as Australia, Mexico
Mexico
and New Zealand. Fight songs differ from stadium anthems, used for similar purposes, in that they are usually written specifically for the purposes of the team, whereas stadium anthems are not. Hundreds of colleges have fight songs, some of which are over a century old. The oldest collegiate fight song in the United States is Boston College's "For Boston", composed by T.J
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Metairie, Louisiana
Metairie (/ˈmɛtəri/ MET-ər-ee; French: Métairie [metɛʁi]) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Jefferson Parish, Louisiana, United States and is a major section of the New Orleans
New Orleans
Metropolitan Area. Metairie is the largest community in Jefferson Parish and the fifth-largest CDP in the United States.[1] It is an unincorporated area that would be Louisiana's fourth-largest city if it were incorporated.[2][3] The zip codes that serve the community are 70001-70006. Métairie is the French term for a small tenant farm which paid the landlord with a share of the produce, also known as sharecropping
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1991 NFL Season
The 1991 NFL season was the 72nd regular season of the National Football League. It was the final season for legendary coach Chuck Noll. The season ended with Super Bowl XXVI
Super Bowl XXVI
when the Washington Redskins defeated the Buffalo Bills
Buffalo Bills
37-24 at the Metrodome
Metrodome
in Minnesota. This was the second of four Super Bowl losses for Buffalo.Contents1 Major rule changes 2 Uniform changes 3 Final regular season standings3.1 Tiebreakers4 Playoffs 5 Coaching changes5.1 In-season6 Awards 7 Draft 8 External links 9 ReferencesMajor rule changes[edit]Source: Total Football: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League (ISBN 0-06-270174-6)
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List Of National Football League Mascots
The following is a list of mascots of National Football League
National Football League
teamsAmerican Football ConferenceTeam Mascot(s) DescriptionBaltimore Ravens Poe, Rise and Conquer Poe, a raven, named after Edgar Allan Poe
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1967 NFL Season
The 1967 NFL season was the 48th regular season of the National Football League. The league expanded to 16 teams with the addition of the New Orleans Saints. The two 8-team conferences were split into two divisions each: the Eastern Conference divisions were Capitol (Dallas, New Orleans, Philadelphia, and Washington) and Century (Cleveland, New York, Pittsburgh, and St. Louis), and the Western Conference divisions were Central (Chicago, Detroit, Green Bay, and Minnesota) and Coastal (Atlanta, Baltimore, Los Angeles, and San Francisco). Each division winner advanced to the playoffs, expanded to four teams in this year. The Saints and the New York Giants
New York Giants
agreed to switch divisions in 1968 and return to the 1967 alignment in 1969
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1991–92 NFL Playoffs
The National Football League playoffs for the 1991 season began on December 28, 1991. The postseason tournament concluded with the Washington Redskins defeating the Buffalo Bills in Super Bowl XXVI, 37–24, on January 26, 1992, at the Hubert H
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1990–91 NFL Playoffs
The National Football League playoffs for the 1990 season began on January 5, 1991. The postseason tournament concluded with the New York Giants defeating the Buffalo Bills in Super Bowl XXV, 20–19, on January 27, at Tampa Stadium in Tampa, Florida. The league expanded its playoff system from a 10-team to a 12-team tournament, which is in use now. With these changes, three wild card teams (those non-division champions with the conference's best won-lost-tied percentages) qualified, up from two the year before. The format consisted of the following:The three division champions from each conference are seeded 1 through 3 based on their regular season won-lost-tied record. Three wild card qualifiers are seeded 4, 5 and 6 within the conference.The 3 and 6 seeds played each other in one game and the 4 and 5 in a second game, both making up what was dubbed the "Wild Card Round"
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1987–88 NFL Playoffs
The National Football League playoffs
National Football League playoffs
for the 1987 season began on January 3, 1988
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New Orleans, Louisiana
New Orleans
New Orleans
(/ˈɔːrl(i)ənz, ɔːrˈliːnz/,[4][5] locally /ˈnɔːrlənz/; French: La Nouvelle- Orléans
Orléans
[la nuvɛlɔʁleɑ̃] ( listen)) is a major United States
United States
port and the largest city and metropolitan area in the state of Louisiana. The population of the city was 343,829 as of the 2010 U.S. Census.[6][7] The New Orleans metropolitan area
New Orleans metropolitan area
(New Orleans–Metairie–Kenner Metropolitan Statistical Area) had a population of 1,167,764 in 2010 and was the 46th largest in the United States.[8] The New Orleans–Metairie–Bogalusa Combined Statistical Area, a larger trading area, had a 2010 population of 1,452,502.[9] Before Hurricane Katrina, Orleans Parish
Orleans Parish
was the most populous parish in Louisiana
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