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New Brunswick
NEW BRUNSWICK (French : Nouveau-Brunswick; Canadian French pronunciation: ( listen )) is one of Canada
Canada
's three Maritime provinces (together with Prince Edward Island
Prince Edward Island
and Nova Scotia
Nova Scotia
) and is the only constitutionally bilingual (English–French) province. The principal cities are Fredericton
Fredericton
, the capital, Greater Moncton , currently the largest metropolitan (CMA ) area and the most populous city, and the port city of Saint John , which was the first incorporated city in Canada
Canada
and largest in the province for 231 years until 2016. In the Canada
Canada
2016 Census , Statistics Canada
Canada
estimated the provincial population to have been 747,101, down very slightly from 751,171 in 2011, on an area of almost 73,000 km2
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ISO 3166-2
ISO 3166-2 is part of the ISO 3166 standard published by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), and defines codes for identifying the principal subdivisions (e.g., provinces or states ) of all countries coded in ISO 3166-1 . The official name of the standard is Codes for the representation of names of countries and their subdivisions – Part 2: Country subdivision
Country subdivision
code. It was first published in 1998. The purpose of ISO 3166-2 is to establish an international standard of short and unique alphanumeric codes to represent the relevant administrative divisions and dependent territories of all countries in a more convenient and less ambiguous form than their full names
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English Language
ENGLISH /ˈɪŋɡlɪʃ/ ( listen ) is a West Germanic language that was first spoken in early medieval England
England
and is now a global lingua franca . Named after the Angles , one of the Germanic tribes that migrated to England
England
, it ultimately derives its name from the Anglia (Angeln) peninsula in the Baltic Sea . It is closely related to the Frisian languages , but its vocabulary has been significantly influenced by other Germanic languages
Germanic languages
particularly Norse , as well as by Latin
Latin
and Romance languages
Romance languages
, particularly French . English has developed over the course of more than 1,400 years. The earliest forms of English, a set of Anglo-Frisian dialects brought to Great Britain
Great Britain
by Anglo-Saxon settlers in the 5th century, are called Old English
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Gross Domestic Product
GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT (GDP) is a monetary measure of the market value of all final goods and services produced in a period (quarterly or yearly). Nominal GDP estimates are commonly used to determine the economic performance of a whole country or region, and to make international comparisons. Nominal GDP per capita does not, however, reflect differences in the cost of living and the inflation rates of the countries; therefore using a basis of GDP per capita at purchasing power parity (PPP) is arguably more useful when comparing differences in living standards between nations
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UTC
COORDINATED UNIVERSAL TIME (French : Temps universel coordonné), abbreviated to UTC, is the primary time standard by which the world regulates clocks and time. It is within about 1 second of mean solar time at 0° longitude ; it does not observe daylight saving time . For most purposes, UTC is considered interchangeable with Greenwich Mean Time
Time
(GMT), but GMT is no longer precisely defined by the scientific community. The first Coordinated Universal Time was informally adopted on 1 January 1960. The system was adjusted several times, including a brief period where time coordination radio signals broadcast both UTC and "Stepped Atomic Time
Time
(SAT)" until a new UTC was adopted in 1970 and implemented in 1972. This change also adopted leap seconds to simplify future adjustments
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ISO 3166
ISO 3166 is a standard published by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) that defines codes for the names of countries , dependent territories , special areas of geographical interest, and their principal subdivisions (e.g., provinces or states ). The official name of the standard is Codes for the representation of names of countries and their subdivisions. CONTENTS * 1 Parts * 2 Editions * 3 ISO 3166 Maintenance Agency * 3.1 Members * 4 See also * 5 References * 6 External links PARTSIt consists of three parts: * ISO 3166-1 , Codes for the representation of names of countries and their subdivisions – Part 1: Country
Country
codes, defines codes for the names of countries, dependent territories, and special areas of geographical interest
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Constitutional Monarchy
A CONSTITUTIONAL MONARCHY is a form of monarchy in which the sovereign exercises their authorities in accordance with a written or unwritten constitution . Constitutional monarchy
Constitutional monarchy
differs from absolute monarchy (in which a monarch holds absolute power), in that constitutional monarchs are bound to exercise their powers and authorities within the limits prescribed within an established legal framework. Constitutional monarchies range from countries such as Morocco
Morocco
, where the constitution grants substantial discretionary powers to the sovereign, to countries such as Sweden
Sweden
or Denmark
Denmark
where the monarch retains very few formal authorities. A constitutional monarchy may refer to a system in which the monarch acts as a non-party political head of state under the constitution , whether written or unwritten
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Latin Language
LATIN (Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: ) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages . The Latin alphabet is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets , and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet
Phoenician alphabet
. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium
Latium
, in the Italian Peninsula
Italian Peninsula
. Through the power of the Roman Republic , it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire . Vulgar Latin developed into the Romance languages
Romance languages
, such as Italian , Portuguese , Spanish , French , and Romanian . Latin
Latin
, Italian and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Canadian Postal Code
A CANADIAN POSTAL CODE is a six-character string that forms part of a postal address in Canada
Canada
. Like British and Dutch postcodes, Canada's postal codes are alphanumeric . They are in the format A1A 1A1, where A is a letter and 1 is a digit, with a space separating the third and fourth characters. As of September 2014, there were 855,815 postal codes using Forward Sortation Areas from A0A in Newfoundland to Y1A in the Yukon . Canada
Canada
Post provides a free postal code look-up tool on its website, via its mobile application, and sells hard-copy directories and CD-ROMs . Many vendors also sell validation tools, which allow customers to properly match addresses and postal codes. Hard-copy directories can also be consulted in all post offices, and some libraries. When writing out the postal address for a location within Canada, the postal code follows the abbreviation for the province or territory
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Demonym
A DEMONYM (/ˈdɛmənɪm/ ; δῆμος dẽmos "people, tribe", ὄνομα ónoma "name") is a word that identifies residents or natives of a particular place, which is derived from the name of that particular place. It is a neologism (i.e., a recently minted term); previously GENTILIC was recorded in English dictionaries, e.g., the Oxford English Dictionary and Chambers Twentieth Century Dictionary. Examples of demonyms include a Pakistani for a person from Pakistan
Pakistan
, Swahili for a person of the Swahili coast , the colloquial Kiwi for a person from New Zealand
New Zealand
, and a Cochabambino for a person from the city of Cochabamba . Demonyms do not always clearly distinguish place of origin or ethnicity from place of residence or citizenship, and many demonyms overlap with the ethnonym for the ethnically dominant group of a region
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Atlantic Time Zone
The ATLANTIC TIME ZONE is a geographical region that keeps standard time—called ATLANTIC STANDARD TIME (AST)—by subtracting four hours from Coordinated Universal Time
Coordinated Universal Time
( UTC
UTC
), resulting in UTC-4
UTC-4
; during part of the year some parts of it observe daylight saving time by instead subtracting only three hours ( UTC-3
UTC-3
). The clock time in this zone is based on the mean solar time of the 60th meridian west
60th meridian west
of the Greenwich Observatory . In Canada
Canada
, the provinces of New Brunswick
New Brunswick
, Nova Scotia
Nova Scotia
, and Prince Edward Island
Prince Edward Island
reckon time specifically as an offset of 4 hours from Greenwich Mean time ( GMT-4 )
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Abies Balsamea
ABIES BALSAMEA or BALSAM FIR is a North American fir , native to most of eastern and central Canada (Newfoundland west to central British Columbia ) and the northeastern United States ( Minnesota
Minnesota
east to Maine , and south in the Appalachian Mountains
Appalachian Mountains
to West Virginia
West Virginia
). CONTENTS * 1 Description * 2 Varieties * 3 Ecology * 4 Life cycle * 5 Uses * 6 Tree
Tree
emblem * 7 Pests * 8 See also * 9 References * 10 Further reading * 11 External links DESCRIPTIONBalsam fir is a small to medium-size evergreen tree typically 14–20 metres (46–66 ft) tall, occasionally reaching a height of 27 metres (89 ft). The narrow conic crown consists of dense, dark-green leaves. The bark on young trees is smooth, grey, and with resin blisters (which tend to spray when ruptured), becoming rough and fissured or scaly on old trees
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Viola Cucullata
VIOLA CUCULLATA, the HOODED BLUE VIOLET, MARSH BLUE VIOLET or PURPLE VIOLET, is a species of the genus Viola native to eastern North America , from Newfoundland west to Ontario
Ontario
and Minnesota
Minnesota
, and south to Georgia . It is a low-growing perennial herbaceous plant up to 20 cm tall. The leaves form a basal cluster; they are simple, up to 10 centimetres (3.9 in) broad, with an entire margin and a long petiole. The flowers are violet, dark blue and occasionally white. with five petals. The fruit is a capsule 10–15 mm long, which splits into three sections at maturity to release the numerous small seeds . SYMBOLISMThe purple violet is the provincial flower of New Brunswick
New Brunswick
. The purple violet is the official flower of the sorority Sigma Sigma Sigma . The purple violet is also one of the official flowers of the Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity
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French Language
Phonological history * Oaths of Strasbourg * Ordinance of Villers-Cotterêts
Ordinance of Villers-Cotterêts
* Anglo-Norman GRAMMAR * Adverbs * Articles and determiners * Pronouns (personal )* Verbs * (conjugation * morphology ) ORTHOGRAPHY * Alphabet * Reforms * Circumflex * Braille PHONOLOGY * Elision * Liaison * Aspirated h * Help:IPA for French * v * t * e FRENCH (le français ( listen ) or la langue française ) is a Romance language
Romance language
of the Indo-European family . It descended from the Vulgar Latin of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
, as did all Romance languages. French has evolved from Gallo-Romance, the spoken Latin
Latin
in Gaul, and more specifically in Northern Gaul
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