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Neotropics
The Neotropical realm
Neotropical realm
is one of the eight biogeographic realms constituting the Earth's land surface. Physically, it includes the tropical terrestrial ecoregions of the Americas
Americas
and the entire South American temperate zone.Contents1 Definition 2 Major ecological regions2.1 Amazonia 2.2 Caribbean 2.3 Central America 2.4 Central Andes 2.5 Eastern South America 2.6 Northern Andes 2.7 Orinoco 2.8 Southern South America3 History 4 Endemic animals and plants4.1 Animals 4.2 Plants5 Neotropic
Neotropic
terrestrial ecoregions 6 References 7 Bibliography 8 External linksDefinition[edit] In biogeography, the Neotropic
Neotropic
or Neotropical realm
Neotropical realm
is one of the eight terrestrial realms
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Neotropic (band)
Riz Maslen is an English electronic music artist. During the mid 1990s, she worked with 4hero
4hero
and Future Sound of London. After playing keyboards for The Beloved, she took out a loan, built a home studio and created her first albums there. In 1995 she signed as Neotropic under Ntone
Ntone
and soon after as Small Fish With Spine to Oxygen Music Works in New York
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Language Family
A language family is a group of languages related through descent from a common ancestral language or parental language, called the proto-language of that family. The term "family" reflects the tree model of language origination in historical linguistics, which makes use of a metaphor comparing languages to people in a biological family tree, or in a subsequent modification, to species in a phylogenetic tree of evolutionary taxonomy. Linguists therefore describe the daughter languages within a language family as being genetically related.[1] According to Ethnologue
Ethnologue
the 7,099 living human languages are distributed in 141 different language families.[2] A "living language" is simply one that is used as the primary form of communication of a group of people
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Biodiversity
Biodiversity, a portmanteau of "bio" (life) and "diversity", generally refers to the variety and variability of life on Earth. According to the United Nations Environment Programme
United Nations Environment Programme
(UNEP), biodiversity typically measures variation at the genetic, the species, and the ecosystem level.[1] Terrestrial biodiversity tends to be greater near the equator,[2] which seems to be the result of the warm climate and high primary productivity.[3] Biodiversity
Biodiversity
is not distributed evenly on Earth, and is richest in the tropics
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Indigenous Peoples
Indigenous peoples, also known as first peoples, aboriginal peoples or native peoples, are ethnic groups who are the original inhabitants of a given region, in contrast to groups that have settled, occupied or colonized the area more recently. Groups are usually described as indigenous when they maintain traditions or other aspects of an early culture that is associated with a given region. Not all indigenous peoples share this characteristic, usually having adopted substantial elements of a colonising culture, such as dress, religion or language. Indigenous peoples
Indigenous peoples
may be settled in a given region (sedentary) or exhibit a nomadic lifestyle across a large territory, but they are generally historically associated with a specific territory on which they depend
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Culture
Culture
Culture
(/ˈkʌltʃər/) is the social behavior and norms found in human societies. Culture
Culture
is considered a central concept in anthropology, encompassing the range of phenomena that are transmitted through social learning in human societies. Some aspects of human behavior, social practices such as culture, expressive forms such as art, music, dance, ritual, religion, and technologies such as tool usage, cooking, shelter, and clothing are said to be cultural universals, found in all human societies
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List Of Subsistence Techniques
A subsistence economy is a non-monetary economy which relies on natural resources to provide for basic needs, through hunting, gathering, and subsistence agriculture. "Subsistence" means supporting oneself at a minimum level; in a subsistence economy, economic surplus is minimal and only used to trade for basic goods, and there is no industrialization.[1][2] In the history of the world, before the first cities, all humans lived in a subsistence economy. As urbanization, civilization, and division of labor spread, various societies moved to other economic systems at various times. Some remain relatively unchanged, ranging from uncontacted peoples, to poor areas of developing countries, to some cultures that choose to retain a traditional economy. Capital can be generally defined as assets invested with the expectation that their value will increase, usually because there is the expectation of profit, rent, interest, royalties, capital gain or some other kind of return
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Urbanization
Urbanization
Urbanization
refers to the population shift from rural to urban areas, "the gradual increase in the proportion of people living in urban areas", and the ways in which each society adapts to the change.[1] It is predominantly the process by which towns and cities are formed and become larger as more people begin living and working in central areas.[2] The United Nations
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Highway
A highway is any public or private road or other public way on land. It is used for major roads, but also includes other public roads and public tracks: It is not an equivalent term to controlled-access highway, or a translation for autobahn, autoroute, etc. In North American and Australian English, major roads such as controlled-access highways or arterial roads are often state highways (Canada: provincial highways). Other roads may be designated "county highways" in the US and Ontario. These classifications refer to the level of government (state, provincial, county) that maintains the roadway. In British English, "highway" is primarily a legal term
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Pastoralism
Pastoralism
Pastoralism
is the branch of agriculture concerned with the raising of livestock. It is animal husbandry: the care, tending and use of animals such as camels, goats, cattle, yaks, llamas, and sheep. "Pastoralism" generally has a mobile aspect; moving the herds in search of fresh pasture and water (in contrast to pastoral farming, in which non-nomadic farmers grow crops and improve pastures for their livestock). Pastoralism
Pastoralism
is similar to nomadic movement because all of them go to places season to productive land, and adapts well to the environment. For example, in savannas, pastoralists and their animals gather when rain water is abundant and the pasture is rich, then scatter during the drying of the savanna.[1] Pastoralists often use their herds to affect their environment. Grazing herds on savannas can ensure the biodiversity of the savannas and prevent them from evolving into scrubland
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Forest Industry
The wood industry or lumber industry is a - usually private - economic sector concerned with forestry, logging, timber trade, and the production of forest products, timber/lumber, primary forest and wood products (e.g. furniture) and secondary products like wood pulp for the pulp and paper industry. Some largest producers are also among the biggest timberland owners. The wood industry plays a dominating role in today's wood economy.Contents1 Distinction 2 Production chain 3 Top producers 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksDistinction[edit] In the narrow sense of the terms, wood, forest, forestry and timber/lumber industry appear to point to different sectors, in the industrialized, internationalized world, there is a tendency toward huge integrated businesses that cover the complete spectrum from silviculture and forestry in private primary or secondary forests or plantations via the logging process up to wood processing and trading and transport (e.g
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Indigenous Languages Of The Americas
Indigenous languages of the Americas
Americas
are spoken by indigenous peoples from Alaska
Alaska
and Greenland
Greenland
to the southern tip of South America, encompassing the land masses that constitute the Americas
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European Colonization Of The Americas
The European colonization of the Americas
Americas
describes the history of the settlement and establishment of control of the continents of the Americas
Americas
by most of the naval powers of Europe.Political map of the Americas
Americas
in 1794Systematic European colonization began in 1492, when a Spanish expedition headed by the Genoese explorer Christopher Columbus
Christopher Columbus
sailed west to find a new trade route to the Far East but inadvertently landed in what came to be known to Europeans as the "New World". Running aground on the northern part of Hispaniola
Hispaniola
on 5 December 1492, which the Taino people had inhabited since the 7th century, the site became the first European settlement in the Americas
Americas
apart from a small Norse attempt in Newfoundland centuries before
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Unclassified Languages
An unclassified language is a language whose genetic affiliation has not been established, usually due to a lack of data
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Tropical And Subtropical Moist Broadleaf Forests
Tropical
Tropical
and subtropical moist broadleaf forests (TSMF), also known as tropical moist forests, are a tropical and subtropical forest biome, sometimes referred to as jungle.Contents1 Definition 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksDefinition[edit]General distribution of tropical moist forestsThe biome includes several types of forests:Lowland equatorial evergreen rain forests, commonly known as tropical rainforests, are forests which receive high rainfall (tropical rainforest climate with more than 2000 mm, or 80 inches, annually) throughout the year
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Language Isolate
A language isolate, in the absolute sense, is a natural language with no demonstrable genealogical (or "genetic") relationship with other languages, one that has not been demonstrated to descend from an ancestor common with any other language. Language isolates are in effect language families consisting of a single language. Commonly cited examples include Ainu, Basque, Korean, Sumerian, and Elamite, though in each case a minority of linguists claim to have demonstrated a relationship with other languages.[1] Some sources use the term "language isolate" to indicate a branch of a larger family with only one surviving daughter. For instance, Albanian, Armenian and Greek are commonly called Indo-European isolates. While part of the Indo-European family, they do not belong to any established branch (such as the Romance, Celtic or Slavic and Germanic branches), but instead form independent branches
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