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Neoclassical Ballet
Neoclassical ballet is the style of 20th-century classical ballet exemplified by the works of George Balanchine. The term "neoclassical ballet" appears in the 1920s with Sergei Diaghilev's Ballets Russes, in response to the excesses of romanticism and modernity.[1] It draws on the advanced technique of 19th-century Russian Imperial dance, but strips it of its detailed narrative and heavy theatrical setting. What is left is the dance itself, sophisticated but sleekly modern, retaining the pointe shoe aesthetic, but eschewing the well-upholstered drama and mime of the full-length story ballet.[2][not in citation given] History and development[edit] Neoclassical ballet is a genre of dance that emerged in the 1920s and evolved throughout the Twentieth Century. Artists of many disciplines in the early 1900s began to rebel against the overly dramatized style of the Romantic Period
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The Taming Of The Shrew (ballet)
The Taming of the Shrew
The Taming of the Shrew
is a ballet in two acts choreographed by John Cranko to keyboard works by Domenico Scarlatti
Domenico Scarlatti
arranged and orchestrated by Kurt-Heinz Stolze. With scenery and costumes designed by Elizabeth Dalton, it was first presented as Der Widerspenstigen Zähmung by the Stuttgart Ballet
Stuttgart Ballet
at the Wṻrtembergische Staatstheater in Stuttgart on 16 March 1969.[1]Contents1 Background 2 Scenario 3 Original cast 4 Critical reception 5 Videography 6 ReferencesBackground[edit] Cranko's ballet is a dance version of William Shakespeare's play The Taming of the Shrew (1590-1592)
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Roland Petit
Roland Petit
Roland Petit
(13 January 1924 – 10 July 2011) was a French ballet company director, choreographer and dancer. He trained at the Paris Opéra Ballet school, and became well known for his creative ballets.Contents1 Life and work 2 Honours 3 Personal life 4 Ballets 5 References 6 External linksLife and work[edit] The son of shoe designer Rose Repetto, Petit was born in Villemomble, near Paris. He trained at the Paris Opéra Ballet school under Gustave Ricaux and Serge Lifar
Serge Lifar
and began to dance with the corps de ballet in 1940
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Symphony In C (ballet)
Symphony in C, originally titled Le Palais de Cristal, is a ballet made by New York City Ballet
New York City Ballet
co-founder and balletmaster George Balanchine to Georges Bizet's Symphony in C (1855). The music of the ballet, which Bizet wrote at the age of 17 while studying with Charles Gounod at the Paris Conservatory, was lost and only rediscovered and published in 1933 (Stravinsky informed Balanchine of this). The premiere was on Monday, July 28, 1947, in the Théâtre National de l'Opéra with the Paris Opéra Ballet
Paris Opéra Ballet
where Balanchine was guest ballet master. According to City Ballet
Ballet
docents[1] the four movements were originally associated with and designed using the colors four gemstones, three of which Balanchine subsequently retained for the three movements of his 1967 ballet Jewels: Emeralds, Rubies and Diamonds
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Jewels (ballet)
Jewels is a three-act ballet created for the New York City Ballet by co-founder and founding choreographer George Balanchine. It premièred on Thursday, 13 April 1967 at the New York State Theater, with sets designed by Peter Harvey and lighting by Ronald Bates.[1] Jewels has been called the first full-length abstract ballet.[2] It has three related movements: Emeralds, Rubies, and Diamonds (usually separated by intermissions). It can also be seen as three separate ballets, linked by their jewel-colored costumes. Balanchine commented: "The ballet had nothing to do with jewels
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Frederick Ashton
Sir Frederick William Mallandaine Ashton OM CH CBE (17 September 1904 – 18 August 1988) was a British ballet dancer and choreographer. He also worked as a director and choreographer in opera, film and revue. Determined to be a dancer, despite the opposition of his conventional middle-class family, Ashton was accepted as a pupil by Léonide Massine and then by Marie Rambert. In 1926 Rambert encouraged him to try his hand at choreography, and though he continued to dance professionally, with success, it was as a choreographer that he became famous. Ashton was chief choreographer to Ninette de Valois, from 1935 until her retirement in 1963, in the company known successively as the Vic-Wells Ballet, the Sadler's Wells Ballet and the Royal Ballet. He succeeded de Valois as director of the company, serving until his own retirement in 1970. Ashton is widely credited with the creation of a specifically English genre of ballet
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Symphonic Variations (ballet)
Symphonic Variations is a one-act ballet by Frederick Ashton set to the eponymous music (M. 46) of César Franck. The premiere, performed by the Sadler's Wells Ballet, took place at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, on 24 April 1946 in a triple bill; the other works were Ashton's Les Patineurs and Robert Helpmann's Adam Zero. The ballet was conducted by Constant Lambert and the set designed by Sophie Fedorovitch.[1]Contents1 Background 2 Description 3 Casts 4 Critical reception 5 Revivals 6 Notes 7 ReferencesBackground[edit] During the Second World War, Ashton listened to Franck's Symphonic Variations a great deal and he decided to develop an elaborate scenario to be set to the music. Constant Lambert, music director for the Sadler's Wells Ballet,[2] at first objected to the use of Franck's music for a ballet; Ashton dropped his original scenario and created an abstract ballet
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Cinderella (Ashton)
This version of the Cinderella
Cinderella
ballet, using Sergei Prokofiev's Cinderella
Cinderella
music and re-choreographed by Frederick Ashton, is a comic ballet.Contents1 Ballet productions 2 Plot outline 3 Origins 4 The score 5 Ashto
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Sylvia (ballet)
Sylvia, originally Sylvia, ou La nymphe de Diane, is a full-length ballet in two or three acts, first choreographed by Louis Mérante
Louis Mérante
to music by Léo Delibes
Léo Delibes
in 1876. Sylvia is a typical classical ballet in many respects, yet it has many interesting features that make it unique. Sylvia is notable for its mythological Arcadian setting, creative choreographies, expansive sets and, above all, its remarkable score. The ballet's origins are in Tasso's 1573 play Aminta, which provides the basic plot of Delibes' work. Jules Barbier
Jules Barbier
and Baron de Reinach[1] adapted this for the Paris Opera.[2][3] The piano arrangement was composed in 1876 and the orchestral suite was done in 1880.[4] When Sylvia premiered on Wednesday, June 14, 1876, at the Palais Garnier, it went largely unnoticed. In fact, the first seven productions of Sylvia were not commercially successful
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Romeo And Juliet (Prokofiev)
Romeo and Juliet
Romeo and Juliet
(Russian: Ромео и Джульетта), Op. 64, is a ballet by Sergei Prokofiev
Sergei Prokofiev
based on William Shakespeare's play Romeo
Romeo
and Juliet. Prokofiev reused music from the ballet in three suites for orchestra and a solo piano work.Contents1 Background and premiere 2 1940 Kirov production 3 Revivals and other productions 4 Score4.1 Instrumentation 4.2 Structure5 Orchestral suites extracted from Romeo
Romeo
and Juliet5.1 Suite No. 1 from Romeo
Romeo
and Juliet, Op. 64bis 5.2 Suite No. 2 from Romeo
Romeo
and Juliet, Op. 64ter 5.3 Suite No. 3 from Romeo
Romeo
and Juliet, Op. 1016 Ten Pieces for Piano, Op
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La Fille Mal Gardée (Ashton)
La fille mal gardée (English: The Wayward Daughter, literal translation: "The Poorly Guarded Girl"), Frederick Ashton's Royal Ballet production, began in 1959 when British choreographer Frederick Ashton created a new version of La fille mal gardée for the Royal Ballet of London. This production premiered on 28 January 1960,[1] with Nadia Nerina as Lise, David Blair as Colas, Stanley Holden as the Widow Simone, and Alexander Grant as Alain
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The Dream (ballet)
The Dream is a one-act ballet adapted from Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream, with choreography by Frederick Ashton
Frederick Ashton
to music by Mendelssohn arranged by John Lanchbery. It was premiered by The Royal Ballet
Ballet
at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden
Covent Garden
on 2 April 1964 in a triple bill with Kenneth MacMillan's Images of Love and Robert Helpmann's Hamlet.[1]Contents1 Background 2 Plot 3 Cast 4 Critical reception 5 Revivals 6 NotesBackground[edit] The ballet was presented to mark the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare's birth. Ashton drastically trimmed Shakespeare's plot, discarding Theseus
Theseus
and Hippolyta and the play-within-a-play, Pyramus and Thisbe. The focus of the ballet is on the fairies and the four lovers from Athens lost in the wood.[2] Lanchbery adapted the overture and incidental music Mendelssohn had written for the play in 1826 and 1842
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Le Jeune Homme Et La Mort
Le Jeune Homme et la Mort is a ballet by Roland Petit, choreographed in 1946 to Bach's Passacaglia and Fugue in C Minor, BWV
BWV
582, with a one-act libretto by Jean Cocteau. It tells the story of a young man driven to suicide by his faithless lover. Sets were by Georges Wakhévitch and costumes variously reported as being by Karinska
Karinska
or Cocteau. Petit is purported[according to whom?] to have created Le Jeune Homme et la Mort for his wife Zizi Jeanmaire, but it was danced by Jean Babilée and Nathalie Philippart at its 25 June 1946 premiere at the Ballets des Champs-Elysées with costumes by Tom Keogh.[1] In 1951, Petit staged the ballet at American Ballet
Ballet
Theatre
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George Balanchine
George Balanchine
George Balanchine
(born Giorgi Melitonovich Balanchivadze; January 22, 1904 – April 30, 1983) was a choreographer. Styled as the father of American ballet,[1] he co-founded the New York City
New York City
Ballet and remained its Artistic Director for more than 35 years.[2] Balanchine took the standards and technique from his time at the Imperial Ballet
Ballet
School and fused it with other schools of movement that he had adopted during his tenure on Broadway and in Hollywood, creating his signature "neoclassical style".[3] He was a choreographer known for his musicality; he expressed music with dance and worked extensively with leading composers of his time like Igor Stravinsky.[4] Balanchine was invited to America in 1933 by a young arts patron named Lincoln Kirstein, and together they founded the School of American Ballet
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Carmen (1949 Ballet)
Carmen
Carmen
is a ballet created by Roland Petit
Roland Petit
and his company ‘Les Ballets de Paris’ at the Prince's Theatre in London on 21 February 1949, which has entered the repertory of ballet companies in France and around the world.[1] This version is in five scenes and represents a striking admixture of classical ballet, Spanish-style movement, mime, and freshly invented dramatic dance action.[2] The original designs and costumes were by Antoni Clavé. The music is taken from the 1875 opera of the same name by Georges Bizet, arranged and orchestrated by Tommy Desserre. The scenario is based on the 1845 novella by Prosper Mérimée. The principal roles were created for Petit's wife Zizi Jeanmaire
Zizi Jeanmaire
(Carmen), Roland Petit
Roland Petit
(Don José) and Serge Perrault (Le Toréador)
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Kenneth Macmillan
Kenneth is an English given name and surname. The name is an Anglicised form of two entirely different Gaelic personal names: Cainnech and Cináed. The modern Gaelic form of Cainnech is Coinneach; the name was derived from a byname meaning "handsome", "comely".[1] The name Cinaed is partly derived from the Celtic *aidhu, meaning "fire".[2] A short form of Kenneth is Ken or Kenn
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