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Neferneferuaten Tasherit
Neferneferuaten
Neferneferuaten
Tasherit or Neferneferuaten
Neferneferuaten
junior (14th century BCE) was an Ancient Egyptian princess of the 18th dynasty
18th dynasty
and the fourth daughter of Pharaoh
Pharaoh
Akhenaten
Akhenaten
and his Great Royal Wife
Great Royal Wife
Nefertiti.Contents1 Family 2 Life 3 Final years and death 4 ReferencesFamily[edit] Neferneferuaten
Neferneferuaten
was born between ca. year 8[1] and 9[2] of her father's reign. She was the fourth of six known daughters of the royal couple. It is likely that she was born in Akhetaten, the capital founded by her father. Her name Neferneferuaten
Neferneferuaten
("Beauty of the Beauties of Aten" or "Most Beautiful One of Aten") is the exact copy of the name Nefertiti
Nefertiti
took in the 5th regnal year
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James Peter Allen
James Peter Allen (born 1945) is an American Egyptologist, specializing in language and religion. He was curator of Egyptian Art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art from 1990 to 2006. In 2007, he became the Wilbour professor of Egyptology at Brown University. In 2008, he was elected president of the International Association of Egyptologists. Major publications[edit]The Inflection of the Verb in the Pyramid Texts (Malibu: Undena, 1984) Genesis in Egypt: The Philosophy of Ancient Egyptian Creation Accounts (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1988) Middle Egyptian: An Introduction to the Language and Culture of Hieroglyphs (Cambridge: University Press, 2000) The Heqanakht papyri. (New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2002) The Art of Medicine in Ancient Egypt (New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2006) The Ancient Egyptian Pyramid Texts (Society of Biblical Literature, 2005) The Egyptian Coffin Texts, Vol. 8
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Great Royal Wife
Great Royal Wife, or alternatively, Chief King's Wife (Ancient Egyptian: ḥmt nswt wrt), is the term that was used to refer to the principal wife of the pharaoh of Ancient Egypt, who served many official functions. A simplified form of the term, Great Wife, is applied to more contemporary royal consorts in states throughout modern Africa
Africa
(e.g., Mantfombi Dlamini of Swaziland, chief consort of the Zulu King).Contents1 Description 2 Great wives today 3 Examples3.1 Ancient Egypt3.1.1 Middle Kingdom 3.1.2 Second Intermediate Period 3.1.3 New Kingdom 3.1.4 Third Intermediate Period 3.1.5 Late Period3.2 Elsewhere in Africa4 See also 5 ReferencesDescription[edit] While most Ancient Egyptians were monogamous, a male pharaoh would have had other, lesser wives and concubines in addition to the Great Royal Wife
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Egyptian Hieroglyphs
Egyptian hieroglyphs
Egyptian hieroglyphs
(/ˈhaɪrəˌɡlɪf, -roʊ-/[2][3]) were the formal writing system used in Ancient Egypt. It combined logographic, syllabic and alphabetic elements, with a total of some 1,000 distinct characters.[4][5] Cursive hieroglyphs
Cursive hieroglyphs
were used for religious literature on papyrus and wood. The later hieratic and demotic Egyptian scripts were derived from hieroglyphic writing; Meroitic was a late derivation from demotic. The use of hieroglyphic writing arose from proto-literate symbol systems in the Early Bronze Age, around the 32nd century BC (Naqada III),[1] with the first decipherable sentence written in the Egyptian language dating to the Second Dynasty
Second Dynasty
(28th century BC)
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Amenhotep III
Amenhotep III (Hellenized as Amenophis III; Egyptian Amāna-Ḥātpa; meaning Amun
Amun
is Satisfied), also known as Amenhotep the Magnificent, was the ninth pharaoh of the Eighteenth Dynasty. According to different authors, he ruled Egypt
Egypt
from June 1386 to 1349 BC, or from June 1388 BC to December 1351 BC/1350 BC,[4] after his father Thutmose IV died. Amenhotep III was Thutmose's son by a minor wife, Mutemwiya.[5] His reign was a period of unprecedented prosperity and artistic splendour, when Egypt
Egypt
reached the peak of its artistic and international power
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The Younger Lady
The Younger Lady
The Younger Lady
is the informal name given to a mummy discovered in the Egyptian Valley of the Kings, in tomb KV35
KV35
by archeologist Victor Loret in 1898.[1] The mummy also has been given the designation KV35YL ("YL" for "Younger Lady") and 61072,[2] and currently resides in the Egyptian Museum
Egyptian Museum
in Cairo. Through recent DNA tests this mummy has been identified as the mother of the Pharaoh Tutankhamun, and a daughter of Pharaoh Amenhotep III
Amenhotep III
and Queen Tiye
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Ancient Egypt
Ancient Egypt
Egypt
was a civilization of ancient Northeastern Africa, concentrated along the lower reaches of the Nile
Nile
River in the place that is now the country Egypt
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Pharaoh
Pharaoh
Pharaoh
(/ˈfeɪ.roʊ/, /fɛr.oʊ/[1][2] or /fær.oʊ/;[2] Coptic: ⲡⲣ̅ⲣⲟ Prro) is the common title of the monarchs of ancient Egypt from the First Dynasty (c. 3150 BCE) until the annexation of Egypt by the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in 30 BCE,[3] although the actual term "Pharaoh" was not used contemporaneously for a ruler until circa 1200 BCE. In the early dynasty, ancient Egyptian kings used to have up to three titles, the Horus, the Nesu Bety, and the Nebty name. The Golden Horus
Horus
and Nomen and prenomen titles were later added. In Egyptian society, religion was central to everyday life. One of the roles of the pharaoh was as an intermediary between the gods and the people. The pharaoh thus deputised for the gods; his role was both as civil and religious administrator
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KV55
KV55
KV55
is a tomb in the Valley of the Kings
Valley of the Kings
in Egypt. It was discovered by Edward R. Ayrton
Edward R. Ayrton
in 1907 while he was working in the Valley for Theodore M. Davis. It has long been speculated, as well as much-disputed, that the body found in this tomb was that of the famous Pharaoh Akhenaten, who moved the capital to Akhetaten
Akhetaten
(modern day Amarna). The results of genetic and other scientific tests published in February 2010 have confirmed that the person buried there was both the son of Amenhotep III
Amenhotep III
as well as the father of Tutankhamun. Furthermore, the study established that the age of this person at the time of his death was consistent with that of Akhenaten's, thereby making it almost certain that it is Akhenaten's body.[1] Both the tomb's history and the identification of its single occupant have been problematic
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Amarna Letters
The Amarna
Amarna
letters (sometimes referred to as the Amarna
Amarna
correspondence or Amarna
Amarna
tablets, and cited with the abbreviation EA) are an archive, written on clay tablets, primarily consisting of diplomatic correspondence between the Egyptian administration and its representatives in Canaan
Canaan
and Amurru during the New Kingdom. The letters were found in Upper Egypt
Upper Egypt
at Amarna, the modern name for the ancient Egyptian capital of Akhetaten (el-Amarna), founded by pharaoh Akhenaten
Akhenaten
(1350s – 1330s BC) during the Eighteenth dynasty of Egypt. The Amarna
Amarna
letters are unusual in Egyptological research, because they are mostly written in Akkadian cuneiform, the writing system of ancient Mesopotamia, rather than that of ancient Egypt
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Tombs Of The Nobles (Amarna)
Located in Middle Egypt, the Tombs of the Nobles at Amarna are the burial places of some of the powerful courtiers and persons of the city of Akhetaten. The tombs are in 2 groups, cut into the cliffs and bluffs in the east of the dry bay of Akhetaten. There are 25 major tombs, many of them decorated and with their owners name, some are small and unfinished, others modest and unassuming. Each seems to reflect the personality and patronage of the tomb's original owner.Contents1 Northern tombs1.1 Desert altars2 Southern tombs 3 Rediscovery and excavation 4 Notes and references4.1 References 4.2 Further reading5 External linksNorthern tombs[edit]Northern Tombs at Amarna, looking south along the cliffsThese tombs are located in two groups in the cliffs overlooking the city of Akhetaten, to the north and east of the city
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Tey
Tey was the wife of Kheperkheprure Ay (occasionally "Aya"), who was the penultimate pharaoh of Ancient Egypt's 18th dynasty. She was also the wet nurse of Queen Nefertiti.[1] Her husband, Ay filled an important role in the courts of several pharaohs – Amenhotep III, Akhenaten and Tutankhamen – before ascending the throne himself, as the male line of the royal family became extinct. He is believed to be connected to the royal family; he was probably a brother of Queen Tiye (wife of Amenhotep III).Contents1 Family 2 Amarna 3 Queen of Egypt 4 References 5 External linksFamily[edit] On inscriptions from the Amarna period, Tey is called “nurse of the Great Royal Wife”
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Meritaten Tasherit
Meritaten Tasherit, which means Meritaten the Younger was an ancient Egyptian princess of the 18th dynasty. She is likely to have been the daughter of Meritaten, eldest daughter of Pharaoh Akhenaten. The father of this child remains under debate. Many assume it to be none other than Meritaten's father, Akhenaten, or possibly her husband Smenkhkare. Since both Meritaten Tasherit and another princess, Ankhesenpaaten Tasherit appear only in texts that once mentioned Akhenaten's second wife Kiya, it is also possible that they were children of Akhenaten and Kiya, or that they were fictional, replacing the name of Kiya's daughter, who might have been Beketaten, more commonly thought to be Tiye's child.[1][2] The fate of this child is uncertain. The mention of the god Aten in her name suggests that she was indeed a daughter of Akhenaten, since his successors reverted his religious reforms, and reverted to the worship of Egypt's traditional gods
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Ankhesenpaaten Tasherit
Ankhesenpaaten Tasherit
Ankhesenpaaten Tasherit
(or Ankhesenpaaten-ta-sherit, “Ankhesenpaaten the Younger”) was an ancient Egyptian princess of the 18th dynasty. Ankhesenpaaten Tasherit
Ankhesenpaaten Tasherit
and another princess, Meritaten Tasherit
Meritaten Tasherit
are two small princesses who appear in scenes dating to the later part of the reign of Akhenaten. The titles of at least one of the princess is of the form "[...-ta]sherit, born of [...], born of the King's Great Wife [...]
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