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Navy Midshipmen Football
The Navy Midshipmen
Navy Midshipmen
football team represents the United States Naval Academy in NCAA Division I
NCAA Division I
FBS (Football Bowl Subdivision) college football. The Naval Academy completed its final season as an FBS independent school (not in a conference) in 2014, and became a single-sport member of the American Athletic Conference
American Athletic Conference
beginning in the 2015 season.[2] The team has been coached by Ken Niumatalolo
Ken Niumatalolo
since December 2007
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Penn Quakers Football
The Penn Quakers
Penn Quakers
football team is the college football team at the University of Pennsylvania
University of Pennsylvania
in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Penn Quakers have competed in the Ivy League
Ivy League
since its inaugural season of 1956, and are currently a Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association
National Collegiate Athletic Association
(NCAA). Penn has played in 1,364 football games, the most of any school in any division. Penn plays its home games at historic Franklin Field, the oldest football stadium in the US
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Safety (gridiron Football Score)
In gridiron football, the safety (American football) or safety touch (Canadian football) is a scoring play that results in two points (or, in rare cases, one point) being awarded to the scoring team. Safeties can be scored in a number of ways, such as when a ball carrier is tackled in his own end zone or when a foul is committed by the offense in their own end zone. After a safety is scored in American football, the ball is kicked off to the team that scored the safety from the 20-yard line; in Canadian football, the scoring team also has the options of taking control of the ball at their own 35-yard line or kicking off the ball, also at their own 35-yard line
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Offside (American Football)
Offside is a minor foul in gridiron football caused when a defender crosses the line of scrimmage ahead of the snap of the ball. The penalty associated with the infraction is the advancing of the ball five yards and a replay of the down.Contents1 History1.1 Definition 1.2 Penalty2 FootnotesHistory[edit] Definition[edit] In gridiron football, offside is a foul in which a player is on the wrong side of the line of scrimmage when the ball is snapped. This foul occurs simultaneously with the snap. Unlike offensive players, defensive players are not compelled to come to a set position before the snap. If a defender jumps across the line but gets back to his side before the snap, there is no foul. In the case of an offside foul, play is not stopped, and the foul is announced at the conclusion of the play
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NCAA Division I
NCAA Division I
NCAA Division I
(D-I) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) in the United States. D-I schools include the major collegiate athletic powers, with larger budgets, more elaborate facilities and more athletic scholarships than Divisions II and III as well as many smaller schools committed to the highest level of intercollegiate competition. This level was once called the University Division of the NCAA, in contrast to the lower level College Division; these terms were replaced with numeric divisions in 1973
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Baltimore News-American
The Baltimore
Baltimore
News-American was a Baltimore
Baltimore
broadsheet newspaper with a continuous lineage (in various forms) of more than 200 years of Baltimore
Baltimore
newspapers. For much of the mid-20th century, it had the largest circulation in the city. Its final edition was published on May 27, 1986.Contents1 History1.1 Lineage1.1.1 Baltimore
Baltimore
American 1.1.2 Baltimore
Baltimore
News 1.1.3 Baltimore
Baltimore
Post 1.1.4 Baltimore
Baltimore
News-Post 1.1.5 The News American2 Notable editors 3 Notes 4 External linksHistory[edit] The News American was formed by a final merger of two papers, the Baltimore
Baltimore
News-Post and The Baltimore
Baltimore
American, in 1964, after a long 191-year history and weaning process
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Delay Of Game
Delay of game is an action in a sports game in which a player or team deliberately stalls the game, usually with the intention of using the delay to its advantage. In some sports, the delay of game is considered an infraction if it is longer than that permitted according to the game's rules, in which case a penalty can be issued. Some sports that have a delay of game penalty are American football, Canadian football, ice hockey and association football.Contents1 Gridiron football1.1 American 1.2 Canadian2 Soccer 3 Ice hockey 4 Bowling 5 Baseball 6 Basketball 7 Quiz bowl 8 See also 9 ReferencesGridiron football[edit] American[edit] In American football, an offensive team is penalized five yards for delay of game if it fails to put the ball in play by either snap or free kick before the play clock expires. This time limit varies by league, and is often 25 seconds from the time the referee signals the ball ready for play
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Walter Camp
Walter Chauncey Camp (April 7, 1859 – March 14, 1925) was an American football
American football
player, coach, and sports writer known as the "Father of American Football". Among a long list of inventions, he created the sport's line of scrimmage and the system of downs.[1] With John Heisman, Amos Alonzo Stagg, Pop Warner, Fielding H. Yost, and George Halas, Camp was one of the most accomplished persons in the early history of American football. He attended Yale College, where he played and coached college football. Camp's Yale teams of 1888, 1891, and 1892 have been recognized as national champions. Camp was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame
College Football Hall of Fame
as a coach in 1951. Camp wrote articles and books on the gridiron and sports in general, annually publishing an "All-American" team
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Chet Gladchuk Jr.
Chester Stephen Gladchuk Jr. (born 1950) is an American college athletics administrator and former American football
American football
player and coach. He is currently the athletic director at the United States Naval Academy, a position he has held since 2001. Gladchuk served as the athletic director at Tulane University
Tulane University
from 1988 to 1990, at Boston College from 1990 to 1997, and at the University of Houston
University of Houston
from 1997 to 2001. Gladchuk attended Worcester Academy
Worcester Academy
and then played college football at Boston College
Boston College
from 1970 to 1972. He coached high school football in New Hampton, New Hampshire
New Hampton, New Hampshire
before moving to the University of Massachusetts Amherst, where he worked as an assistant athletic director
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Johns Hopkins Blue Jays Football
The Johns Hopkins
Johns Hopkins
Blue Jays football team represents Johns Hopkins University in the sport of American football. The Blue Jays compete in Division III of the National Collegiate Athletic Association
National Collegiate Athletic Association
(NCAA) as members of the Centennial Conference. Johns Hopkins
Johns Hopkins
has fielded a team since 1882. History[edit] Hopkins' first team was assembled in 1881, and spent an entire year training and learning a version of the game. Their sport, which was closer to rugby, was played in Druid Hill Park. After the training, the team planned a two-game 1882 season. The squad had to play the season under the title of the Clifton Athletic Club, due to the school's policy on the sport of football. The first was a practice game with the Baltimore Athletic Club, played on October 7. The Hopkins team lost the contest 4–0
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End Zone
The end zone is the scoring area on the field, according to gridiron-based codes of football. It is the area between the end line and goal line bounded by the sidelines. There are two end zones, each being on an opposite side of the field. It is bordered on all sides by a white line indicating its beginning and end points, with orange, square pylons placed at each of the four corners as a visual aid (however, prior to around the early 1970s, flags were used instead to denote the end zone)
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Stanford Cardinal Football
The Stanford Cardinal
Stanford Cardinal
football program represents Stanford University in college football at the NCAA Division I FBS
NCAA Division I FBS
level and is a member of the Pac-12 Conference's North Division. Stanford, the top-ranked academic institution with a FBS program,[4] has a highly successful football tradition. The team is currently known as the Cardinal, adopted prior to the 1982 season.[5] Stanford was known as the "Indians" from 1930 to January 1972,[6] and the "Cardinals" from 1972 through 1981. A student vote in December 1975 to change the nickname to "Robber Barons" was not approved by administrators.[6][7] Stanford has fielded football teams every year since 1892 with a few exceptions. Like a number of other teams from the era concerned with violence in the sport, the school dropped football in favor of rugby from 1906 to 1917
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Reveille
"Reveille" (US: /ˈrɛvəli/ REV-ə-lee; UK: /rəˈvæli/ rə-VAL-ee)[1] is a bugle call, trumpet call or pipes call most often associated with the military and prisons; it is chiefly used to wake military personnel and prisoners at sunrise
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Military Parade
A military parade is a formation of soldiers whose movement is restricted by close-order manouvering known as drilling or marching. The military parade is now almost entirely ceremonial, though soldiers from time immemorial up until the late 19th century fought in formation
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Annapolis, Maryland
Annapolis (/əˈnæpəlɪs/) is the capital of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Maryland, as well as the county seat of Anne Arundel
Anne Arundel
County. Situated on the Chesapeake Bay
Chesapeake Bay
at the mouth of the Severn River, 25 miles (40 km) south of Baltimore
Baltimore
and about 30 miles (50 km) east of Washington, D.C., Annapolis is part of the Baltimore–Washington metropolitan area. Its population was measured at 38,394 by the 2010 census. The city served as the seat of the Confederation Congress
Confederation Congress
(former Second Continental Congress) and temporary national capital of the United States
United States
in 1783–1784. At that time, General George Washington came before the body convened in the new Maryland
Maryland
State House and resigned his commission as commander of the Continental Army
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1926 Rose Bowl
The 1926 Rose Bowl Game was held on January 1, 1926, in Pasadena, California. The game is commonly referred to as "The Game That Changed The South."[1] The game featured the Alabama Crimson Tide, making their first bowl appearance, and the Washington Huskies. The Crimson Tide was led by Johnny Mack Brown. The Huskies by George "Wildcat" Wilson. [2] Alabama were victorious 20–19, as they scored all twenty points in the third quarter. With the victory, the Crimson Tide were awarded with their first National Championship. The game made its radio broadcast debut, with Charles Paddock, a sports writer and former Olympian track star, at the microphone.[3] Coach Wade was later inducted into the Rose Bowl Hall of Fame in 1990.[4] Johnny Mack Brown went on to a long career as a movie actor, mostly in westerns
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