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NatWest
National Westminster Bank, commonly known as NatWest, is a large retail and commercial bank in the United Kingdom. It was established in 1968 by the merger of National Provincial Bank
National Provincial Bank
(established 1833 as National Provincial Bank
National Provincial Bank
of England) and Westminster Bank
Westminster Bank
(established 1834 as London County and Westminster Bank). Since 2000 it has been part of the Royal Bank of Scotland
Scotland
Group. Following "ring-fencing" of the Group's core domestic business, the bank is a direct subsidiary of NatWest
NatWest
Holdings
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Financial Services
Financial services
Financial services
are the economic services provided by the finance industry, which encompasses a broad range of businesses that manage money, including credit unions, banks, credit-card companies, insurance companies, accountancy companies, consumer-finance companies, stock brokerages, investment funds, individual managers and some government-sponsored enterprises.[1] Financial services
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Scotland
Scotland
Scotland
(/ˈskɒtlənd/; Scots: [ˈskɔtlənd]; Scottish Gaelic: Alba
Alba
[ˈal̪ˠapə] ( listen)) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain.[16][17][18] It shares a border with England
England
to the south, and is otherwise surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the North Sea
North Sea
to the east and the North Channel and Irish Sea
Irish Sea
to the south-west. In addition to the mainland, the country is made up of more than 790 islands,[19] including the Northern Isles
Northern Isles
and the Hebrides. The Kingdom of Scotland
Kingdom of Scotland
emerged as an independent sovereign state in the Early Middle Ages
Early Middle Ages
and continued to exist until 1707
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Midland Bank
Midland Bank
Midland Bank
Plc was one of the Big Four banking groups in the United Kingdom for most of the 20th century. It is now part of HSBC. The bank was founded as the Birmingham
Birmingham
and Midland Bank
Midland Bank
in Union Street, Birmingham, England in August 1836. It expanded in the Midlands, absorbing many local banks, and merged with the Central Bank of London Ltd. in 1891, becoming the London
London
City and Midland Bank. After a period of nationwide expansion, including the acquisition of many smaller banks, the name Midland Bank
Midland Bank
Ltd was adopted in 1923. By 1934, it was the largest deposit bank in the world
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Nottingham
Nottingham
Nottingham
(/ˈnɒtɪŋəm/ ( listen) NOT-ing-əm) is a city and unitary authority area in Nottinghamshire, England, 128 miles (206 km) north of London, in the East Midlands. Nottingham
Nottingham
has links to the legend of Robin Hood
Robin Hood
and to the lace-making, bicycle (notably Raleigh bikes), and tobacco industries. It was granted its city charter in 1897 as part of Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee celebrations. Nottingham
Nottingham
is a tourist destination; in 2011, visitors spent over £1.5 billion—the thirteenth-highest amount in England's 111 statistical territories.[6] In 2015, Nottingham
Nottingham
had an estimated population of 321,550[7] with the wider urban area, which includes many of the city's suburbs, having a population of 915,977
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MasterCard
Mastercard Incorporated (stylized as MasterCard
MasterCard
from 1979-2016 and mastercard since 2016) is an American multinational financial services corporation headquartered in the MasterCard
MasterCard
International Global Headquarters in Purchase, New York, United States.[2] The Global Operations Headquarters is located in O'Fallon, Missouri, United States, a suburb of St. Louis, Missouri. Throughout the world, its principal business is to process payments between the banks of merchants and the card issuing banks or credit unions of the purchasers who use the "Mastercard" brand debit and credit cards to make purchases. Mastercard Worldwide has been a publicly traded company since 2006
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Debit Card
A debit card (also known as a bank card, plastic card or check card) is a plastic payment card that can be used instead of cash when making purchases. It is similar to a credit card, but unlike a credit card, the money comes directly from the user's bank account when performing a transaction. Some cards may carry a stored value with which a payment is made, while most relay a message to the cardholder's bank to withdraw funds from a payer's designated bank account. In some cases, the primary account number is assigned exclusively for use on the Internet and there is no physical card. In many countries, the use of debit cards has become so widespread that their volume has overtaken or entirely replaced cheques and, in some instances, cash transactions. The development of debit cards, unlike credit cards and charge cards, has generally been country specific resulting in a number of different systems around the world, which were often incompatible
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Listed Building
A listed building or listed structure is one that has been placed on one of the four statutory lists maintained by Historic England
Historic England
in England, Historic Environment Scotland
Historic Environment Scotland
in Scotland, Cadw
Cadw
in Wales, and the Northern Ireland Environment Agency in Northern Ireland. The term has also been used in Ireland, where buildings are surveyed for the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage
National Inventory of Architectural Heritage
in accordance with the country's obligations under the Granada Convention. However, the preferred term in Ireland is protected structure.[1] A listed building may not be demolished, extended, or altered without special permission from the local planning authority, which typically consults the relevant central government agency, particularly for significant alterations to the more notable listed buildings
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Big Bang (financial Markets)
The phrase Big Bang, used in reference to the sudden deregulation of financial markets, was coined to describe measures, including abolition of fixed commission charges and of the distinction between stockjobbers and stockbrokers on the London Stock Exchange
London Stock Exchange
and change from open-outcry to electronic, screen-based trading, effected by Margaret Thatcher
Margaret Thatcher
in 1986. The Big Bang was the result of an agreement in 1983 by the Thatcher government and the London Stock Exchange
London Stock Exchange
to settle a wide-ranging antitrust case that had been initiated during the previous government by the Office of Fair Trading
Office of Fair Trading
against the London Stock Exchange
London Stock Exchange
under the Restrictive Trade Practices Act 1956
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Online Banking
Online banking, also known as internet banking, it is an electronic payment system that enables customers of a bank or other financial institution to conduct a range of financial transactions through the financial institution's website
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Automated Teller Machine
An automated teller machine (ATM) is an electronic telecommunications device that enables customers of financial institutions to perform financial transactions, such as cash withdrawals, deposits, transfer funds, or obtaining account information, at any time and without the need for direct interaction with bank staff. ATMs are known by a variety of names, including automatic teller machine in the United States[1][2][3] (ATM, American, British, Australian, Malaysian, South African, Singaporean, Indian, Maldivian, Hiberno, Philippines and Sri Lankan English), often redundantly ATM machine, automated banking machine (ABM, Canadian English[4][5]). In British English, the terms cash point, cash mashine and "hole in the wall" are most widely used.[6]Other terms include cashline, nibank, cash machine, tyme machine, cash dispenser, bankomat or bancomat
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Branch (banking)
A branch, banking center or financial center is a retail location where a bank, credit union, or other financial institution (including a brokerage firm) offers a wide array of face-to-face and automated services to its customers.Contents1 History and description1.1 Legal restrictions in the United States2 Types of branches2.1 Instore 2.2 Foreign bank branch3 ReferencesHistory and description[edit] During the 3rd century banks in Persia (now Iran) and in other territories started to issue letters of credit known as Sakks, basically checks in today’s language, that could be traded in cooperative houses or offices throughout the Persian territories.[citation needed] In the period from 1100-1300 banking started to expand across Europe and banks began opening ‘branches’ in remote, foreign locations to support international trade.[citation needed] In 1327, Avignon in France had 43 branches of Italian banking houses alone.[citation neede
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Clearing Banks
In banking and finance, clearing denotes all activities from the time a commitment is made for a transaction until it is settled. This process turns the promise of payment (for example, in the form of a cheque or electronic payment request) into the actual movement of money from one account to another. Clearing houses were formed to facilitate such transactions among banks.Contents1 Description 2 History2.1 Cheque clearing 2.2 Securities clearing 2.3 Derivatives clearing3 United States clearing system 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksDescription[edit] In trading, clearing is necessary because the speed of trades is much faster than the cycle time for completing the underlying transaction. It involves the management of post-trading, pre-settlement credit exposures to ensure that trades are settled in accordance with market rules, even if a buyer or seller should become insolvent prior to settlement
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Merchant Bank
A merchant bank is historically a bank dealing in commercial loans and investment. In modern British usage it is the same as an investment bank. Merchant
Merchant
banks were the first modern banks and evolved from mediaeval merchants who traded in commodities, particularly cloth merchants. Historically, merchant banks' purpose was to facilitate and/or finance production and trade of commodities, hence the name "merchant". Few banks today restrict their activities to such a narrow scope. In modern usage in the United States, the term additionally has taken on a more narrow meaning, and refers to a financial institution providing capital to companies in the form of share ownership instead of loans
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Brokerage Firm
A brokerage firm, or simply brokerage, is a financial institution that facilitates the buying and selling of financial securities between a buyer and a seller. Brokerage firms serve a clientele of investors who trade public stocks and other securities, usually through the firm's agent stockbrokers.[1] A traditional, or "full service", brokerage firm usually undertakes more than simply carrying out a stock or bond trade. The staff of this type of brokerage firm is entrusted with the responsibility of researching the markets to provide appropriate recommendations, and in doing so they direct the actions of pension fund managers and portfolio managers alike
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Electronic Purse
Digital currency
Digital currency
(digital money or electronic money or electronic currency) is a type of currency available only in digital form, not in physical (such as banknotes and coins). It exhibits properties similar to physical currencies, but allows for instantaneous transactions and borderless transfer-of-ownership. Examples include virtual currencies and cryptocurrencies[1] or even central bank issued "digital base money". Like traditional money, these currencies may be used to buy physical goods and services, but may also be restricted to certain communities such as for use inside an online game or social network.[2] Digital currency
Digital currency
is a money balance recorded electronically on a stored-value card or other device. Another form of electronic money is network money, allowing the transfer of value on computer networks, particularly the Internet
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