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Native Hawaiian
Native Hawaiians
Native Hawaiians
(Hawaiian: kānaka ʻōiwi, kānaka maoli, and Hawaiʻi maoli) are the aboriginal Polynesian people of the Hawaiian Islands or their descendants.[3] Native Hawaiians
Native Hawaiians
trace their ancestry back to the original Polynesian settlers of Hawaii. According to the U.S. Census Bureau report for 2000, there are 401,000 people who identified themselves as being "Native Hawaiian" alone or in combination with one or more other races or Pacific Islander groups
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List Of Elementary Schools In Hawaii
This is a list of elementary schools in the U.S. state
U.S

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Measles
Measles
Measles
is a highly contagious infectious disease caused by the measles virus.[3][9] Symptoms usually develop 10–12 days after exposure to an infected person and last 7–10 days.[6][7] Initial symptoms typically include fever, often greater than 40 °C (104.0 °F), cough, runny nose, and inflamed eyes.[3][4] Small white spots known as Koplik's spots
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United States Census Bureau
The United States
United States
Census
Census
Bureau (USCB; officially the Bureau of the Census, as defined in Title 13 U.S.C. § 11) is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, responsible for producing data about the American people and economy. The Census Bureau is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce
Department of Commerce
and its director is appointed by the President of the United States. The Census
Census
Bureau's primary mission is conducting the U.S. Census every ten years, which allocates the seats of the U.S
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Hawaiian Islands
The Hawaiian Islands
Hawaiian Islands
(Hawaiian: Mokupuni o Hawai‘i) are an archipelago of eight major islands, several atolls, numerous smaller islets, and seamounts in the North Pacific Ocean, extending some 1,500 miles (2,400 kilometers) from the island of Hawaiʻi in the south to northernmost Kure Atoll. Formerly the group was known to Europeans and Americans as the "Sandwich Islands", a name chosen by James Cook
James Cook
in honor of the then First Lord of the Admiralty
First Lord of the Admiralty
John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich. The contemporary name is derived from the name of the largest island, Hawaii
Hawaii
Island. The Hawaiian monarchy was overthrown in 1893. The islands were subsequently put under the control of a republic, which the United States annexed in 1898.[1] The U.S. state
U.S

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Samoa
Coordinates: 13°35′S 172°20′W / 13.583°S 172.333°W / -13.583; -172.333Independent State of Samoa Malo Saʻoloto Tutoʻatasi o Sāmoa  (Samoan)FlagCoat of armsMotto: "Faʻavae i le Atua Sāmoa" " Samoa
Samoa
is founded on God"Anthem: O le fuʻa o le saʻolotoga o Samoa "The Banner of Freedom" The National Anthem of SamoaCapital and largest city Apia 13°50′S 171°45′W / 13.833°S 171.750°W / -13.833; -
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Menehune
In Hawaiian mythology, the Menehune
Menehune
are said to be a people, sometimes described as dwarfs in size, who live in the deep forests and hidden valleys of the Hawaiian Islands, far from the eyes of normal humans. Their favorite food is the maiʻa (banana), and they also like fish. The Menehune
Menehune
were said to be superb craftspeople. Legends say that the Menehune
Menehune
built temples (heiau), fishponds, roads, canoes, and houses. Some of these structures that Hawaiian folklore attributed to the Menehune
Menehune
still exist
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Heiau
A heiau (/ˈheɪaʊ/) is a Hawaiian temple. Many types of heiau were built, including heiau to treat the sick (heiau hōʻola), offer first fruits, offer first catch, start rain, stop rain, increase the population, ensure the health of the nation, achieve success in distant voyaging, reach peace, and achieve success in war (luakini). Only the luakini was dedicated through human sacrifice.[1] There are two types of luakini. They were called the ʻohiʻa ko and hakuʻohiʻa.[2] Heiau
Heiau
were made in different architectural styles depending upon their purpose and location. At the official end of Hawaiian religion
Hawaiian religion
in 1819 under pressure from Christian missionaries, many were deliberately destroyed, while others were allowed to fall into disrepair. Heiau
Heiau
are still considered sacred by many of the inhabitants of Hawaii, and some are not open to the public
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Mormonism
Mormonism
Mormonism
is the predominant religious tradition of the Latter Day Saint movement of Restorationist Christianity. Joseph Smith
Joseph Smith
founded the movement in Western New York
Western New York
in the 1820s. During the 1830s and 1840s, it distinguished itself from traditional Protestantism. Mormonism
Mormonism
represents the faith taught by Smith in the 1840s. After he was killed in 1844, most Mormons
Mormons
followed Brigham Young
Brigham Young
on his westward journey to the area that became the Utah Territory, calling themselves The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
(LDS Church). Other sects include Mormon fundamentalism, which seeks to maintain practices and doctrines such as polygamy,[1] and various other small independent denominations
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Influenza
Influenza, commonly known as "the flu", is an infectious disease caused by an influenza virus.[1] Symptoms can be mild to severe.[4] The most common symptoms include: a high fever, runny nose, sore throat, muscle pains, headache, coughing, and feeling tired.[1] These symptoms typically begin two days after exposure to the virus and most last less than a week.[1] The cough, however, may last for more than two weeks.[1] In children, there may be nausea and vomiting, but these are not common in adults.[5] Nausea and vomiting occur more commonly in the unrelated infection gastroenteritis, which is sometimes inaccurately referred to as "stomach flu" or the "24-hour flu".[5] Complications of influenza may include viral pneumonia, secondary bacterial pneumonia, sinus infections, and worsening of previous health problems such as asthma or heart failure.[2][4] Th
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Territory Of Hawaii
The Territory of Hawaii
Hawaii
or Hawaii
Hawaii
Territory[1][2][3] was an organized incorporated territory of the United States
United States
that existed from August 12, 1898, until August 21, 1959, when most of its territory, excluding Palmyra Island and the Stewart Islands, was admitted to the Union as the fiftieth U.S. state, the State of Hawaii. The Hawaii
Hawaii
Admission Act specified that the State of Hawaii
Hawaii
would not include the distant Palmyra Island, the Midway Islands, Kingman Reef, and Johnston Atoll, which includes Johnston (or Kalama) Island and Sand Island, and the Act was silent regarding the Stewart Islands.[4] The U.S. Congress passed the Newlands Resolution
Newlands Resolution
which annexed the Republic of Hawaii
Republic of Hawaii
to the United States
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Smallpox
Smallpox
Smallpox
was an infectious disease caused by one of two virus variants, Variola major and Variola minor.[7] The last naturally occurring case was diagnosed in October 1977 and the World Health Organization certified the global eradication of the disease in 1980.[10] The risk of death following contracting the disease was about 30%, with higher rates among babies.[6][11] Often those who survive have extensive scarring of their skin and some are left blind.[6] The initial symptoms of the disease include fever and vomiting.[5] This is then followed by formation of sores in the mouth and a skin rash.[5] Ove
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Hawai'i Sign Language
Hawaiʻi Sign Language (HSL), also known as Old Hawaiʻi Sign Language and Pidgin Sign Language (PSL),[4] is an indigenous sign language used in Hawaiʻi. Although historical records document its presence on the islands since the 1820s, it was not uncovered until 2013 by linguists at the University of Hawai'i.[2] It is the first new language to be uncovered within the United States since the 1930s.[5] Linguistic experts believe HSL may be the last undiscovered language in the country.[6] Although previously believed to be related to ASL,[7] the two languages are in fact unrelated.[8][9] The initial research team interviewed 19 deaf people and two children of deaf parents on four islands.[10] It was found that eighty percent of HSL vocabulary is different than American Sign Language, proving HSL a distinct language from ASL
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Whooping Cough
Pertussis
Pertussis
(also known as whooping cough or 100-day cough) is a highly contagious bacterial disease.[10][1] Initially, symptoms are usually similar to those of the common cold with a runny nose, fever, and mild cough.[1] This is then followed by weeks of severe coughing fits.[1] Following a fit of coughing, a high-pitched whoop sound or gasp may occur as the person breathes in.[1] The coughing may last for 10 or more weeks, hence the phrase "100-day cough".[3] A person may cough so hard that they vomit, break ribs, or become very tired from the effort.[1][2] Children less than one year old may have little or no cough and instead have periods w
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English Language
English is a West Germanic language
West Germanic language
that was first spoken in early medieval England
England
and is now a global lingua franca.[4][5] Named after the Angles, one of the Germanic tribes that migrated to England, it ultimately derives its name from the Anglia (Angeln) peninsula in the Baltic Sea. It is closely related to the Frisian languages, but its vocabulary has been significantly influenced by other Germanic languages, particularly Norse (a North Germanic
North Germanic
language), as well as by Latin
Latin
and Romance languages, especially French.[6] English has developed over the course of more than 1,400 years. The earliest forms of English, a set of Anglo-Frisian dialects brought to Great Britain by Anglo-Saxon settlers in the 5th century, are called Old English
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1900 United States Census
The Twelfth United States
United States
Census, conducted by the Census Office on June 1, 1900,[1] determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21.0 percent over the 62,979,766 persons enumerated during the 1890 Census.Contents1 Census questions 2 Data availability 3 State rankings 4 City rankings 5 References 6 External linksCensus questions[edit]The 1900 census collected the following information:[2]address name relationship to head of family gender race (listed as "Color or race" on the census) age, month and year born marital status and
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