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National Jewish Book Award
The Jewish Book Council
Jewish Book Council
(Hebrew: הפרס הלאומי לספרים יהודיים‬) founded in 1944, is an organization encouraging and contributing to Jewish literature.[1][2] The goal of the council, as stated on its website, is "to promote the reading, writing and publishing of quality English language books of Jewish content in North America".[2] The council sponsors the National Jewish Book Awards, the Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature, the JBC Network, JBC Book Clubs, the Visiting Scribe series, and Jewish Book Month
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Jewish Literature
Jewish literature includes works written by Jews on Jewish themes, literary works written in Jewish languages on various themes, and literary works in any language written by Jewish writers.[1] Ancient Jewish literature includes Biblical literature and rabbinic literature. Medieval Jewish literature includes not only rabbinic literature but also ethical literature, philosophical literature, mystical literature, various other forms of prose including history and fiction, and various forms of poetry of both religious and secular varieties.[1] The production of Jewish literature has flowered with the modern emergence of secular Jewish culture
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Nicole Krauss
Nicole Krauss (born August 18, 1974)[1] is an American author best known for her four novels Man Walks Into a Room (2002), The History of Love (2005), Great House (2010) and Forest Dark (2017). Her fiction has been published in The New Yorker, Harper's, Esquire, and Granta's Best American Novelists Under 40, and has been collected in Best American Short Stories 2003 and Best American Short Stories 2008
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Jewish Federations
A Jewish Federation (Jfed) is the secular primary Jewish nonprofit organization found within most metropolitan areas (or sometimes states) in North America that host a substantial Jewish community. Their broad purpose is to provide "human services", generally, but not exclusively, to the local Jewish community. All federations at least operate an annual central campaign then allocate the proceeds to affiliated local agencies.[1] There are 148 Jewish Federations
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BookExpo America
BookExpo America (commonly referred to within the book publishing industry as BEA) is the largest annual book trade fair in the United States. BEA is almost always held in a major city over four days in late May and/or early June. Nearly all significant book publishers in the United States, and many from abroad, have booths and exhibits at BEA, and use the fair as an opportunity to showcase upcoming titles, sell current books, socialize with colleagues from other publishing houses, and sell and buy subsidiary rights and international rights. Authors, librarians, and buyers for book retailers also attend the event. The book fair was held in Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
as the American Booksellers Association Convention and Trade Show from 1947 until 1971.[1] In the 1990s and early 2000s, BEA was often held in Chicago
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Rich Cohen (author)
Rich Cohen (born July 30, 1968) is an American non-fiction writer. He is a contributing editor at Vanity Fair and Rolling Stone magazines. He is co-creator, with Martin Scorsese, Mick Jagger and Terence Winter, of the HBO series Vinyl.[1] His works have been New York Times bestsellers, New York Times Notable Books, and have been collected in the Best American Essays series
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Nathan Englander
Nathan Englander (born 1970) is an American short story writer and novelist. His debut short story collection, For the Relief of Unbearable Urges, was published by Alfred A. Knopf, in 1999. His second collection, What We Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank, won the 2012 Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.Contents1 Biography 2 Literary career 3 Awards and critical acclaim 4 Published works 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] Nathan Englander was born in West Hempstead on Long Island, New York, and grew up there as part of the Orthodox Jewish community.[1] He attended the Hebrew Academy of Nassau County for high school and graduated from the State University of New York at Binghamton and the Iowa Writers' Workshop at the University of Iowa. In the mid-1990s, he moved to Israel, where he lived for five years.[2][3] Englander lives in Brooklyn, New York and Madison, Wisconsin
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Myla Goldberg
Myla Goldberg (born November 19, 1971) is an American novelist and musician.Contents1 Biography 2 Career 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Goldberg was born into a Jewish family. She was raised in Laurel, Maryland, and graduated from Eleanor Roosevelt High School. She majored in English at Oberlin College, graduating in 1993.[1] She spent a year teaching and writing in Prague (providing the germ of her book of essays Time's Magpie, which explores her favorite places within the city), then moved to Brooklyn, New York, where she still lives with her husband (Jason Little) and two daughters. Goldberg is an accomplished amateur musician. She plays the banjo and accordion in a Brooklyn-based indie rock quartet, The Walking Hellos. She has performed with The Galerkin Method and the Bindlestiff Family Cirkus
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Ari L. Goldman
Ari L. Goldman (born September 22, 1949) is a Professor of Journalism at Columbia University and a former reporter for The New York Times.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career 3 Personal life 4 Books 5 References 6 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Goldman attended the Rabbi Jacob Joseph School on the Lower East Side of Manhattan.[1] He was educated at Yeshiva University, Columbia and Harvard. Career[edit] Goldman is a tenured professor at Columbia, where he directs the Scripps Howard Program on Religion, Journalism and the Spiritual Life. The program has enabled him to take his "Covering Religion" seminar on study tours of Israel, Ireland, Italy, Russia and India
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Irving Greenberg
Irving (Yitzchak) Greenberg (born 1933), also known as Yitz Greenberg, is a Jewish-American scholar and author who identifies as a Modern Orthodox rabbi. He is known as a strong supporter of Israel[1] and a promoter of greater understanding between Judaism
Judaism
and Christianity.[2] In 1953 Greenberg was ordained at Yeshiva Beis Yosef. He earned a PhD. from Harvard University
Harvard University
and served as the Jewish chaplain of Brandeis University, the rabbi of the Riverdale Jewish Center, an associate professor of history at Yeshiva University, and as a founder, chairman, and professor in the department of Jewish studies of the City College of the City University of New York.[3] He has also served as the President of the National Jewish Center for Learning and Leadership
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David Horowitz
David Joel Horowitz (born January 10, 1939) is an American conservative writer. He is a founder and current president of the think tank the David Horowitz
David Horowitz
Freedom Center; editor of the Center's publication, FrontPage Magazine; and director of Discover the Networks, a website that tracks individuals and groups on the political left. Horowitz also founded the organization Students for Academic Freedom. Horowitz has written several books with author Peter Collier, including four on prominent 20th-century American political families that had members elected to the presidency. He and Collier have collaborated on books about current cultural criticism. Horowitz has also worked as a columnist for Salon. Its then-editor Joan Walsh described him as a "conservative provocateur".[2] From 1956 to 1975, Horowitz was an outspoken adherent of the New Left. He later rejected liberal and progressive ideas completely and has since become a proponent of conservatism
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Eric Kandel
Eric Richard Kandel (German: [ˈkandəl]; born November 7, 1929) is an Austrian-American[2] neuroscientist and a University Professor
University Professor
of biochemistry and biophysics at the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University. He was a recipient of the 2000 Nobel Prize
Nobel Prize
in Physiology
Physiology
or Medicine for his research on the physiological basis of memory storage in neurons. He shared the prize with Arvid Carlsson
Arvid Carlsson
and Paul Greengard. Kandel, who had studied psychoanalysis, wanted to understand how memory works
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Harold Kushner
Rabbi Harold Samuel Kushner is a prominent American rabbi aligned with the progressive wing of Conservative Judaism,[1][citation needed] and a popular author.Contents1 Education 2 Congregational Rabbi 3 Author 4 List of publications 5 Miscellaneous 6 References 7 External linksEducation[edit] Born in Brooklyn, Kushner was educated at Columbia University and later obtained his rabbinical ordination from the Jewish Theological Seminary (JTS) in 1960. The same institution awarded him a doctoral degree in Bible in 1972. Kushner has also studied at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, taught at Clark University and the Rabbinical School of the JTS, and received six honorary doctorates. Congregational Rabbi[edit] He served as the congregational rabbi of Temple Israel of Natick, in Natick, Massachusetts for 24 years and belongs to the Rabbinical Assembly. Author[edit] He is the author of a best selling book on the problem of evil, When Bad Things Happen to Good People
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Synagogues
A synagogue, also spelled synagog (pronounced /ˈsɪnəɡɒɡ/; from Greek συναγωγή, synagogē, 'assembly', Hebrew: בית כנסת‬ bet kenesset, 'house of assembly' or בית תפילה‬ bet tefila, "house of prayer", Yiddish: שול shul, Ladino: אסנוגה esnoga or קהל kahal), is a Jewish house of prayer. Synagogues have a large place for prayer (the main sanctuary), and may also have smaller rooms for study and sometimes a social hall and offices. Some have a separate room for Torah
Torah
study, called the בית מדרש‬ beth midrash "house of study". Synagogues are consecrated spaces used for the purpose of prayer, Tanakh
Tanakh
(the entire Hebrew Bible, including the Torah) reading, study and assembly; however, a synagogue is not necessary for worship. Halakha holds that communal Jewish worship can be carried out wherever ten Jews
Jews
(a minyan) assemble
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Aaron Lansky
Aaron Lansky (born June 17, 1955 in New Bedford, Massachusetts)[1][2] is the founder of the Yiddish Book Center, an organization he created to help salvage Yiddish language publications. When he began saving books in the early 1980s, most experts believe that there were fewer than 70,000 Yiddish volumes extant. He received a MacArthur Fellowship in 1989 for his work. Lansky is the author of Outwitting History (2004), an autobiographical account of how he saved the Yiddish books of the world, from the 1970s to the present day. It won the 2005 Massachusetts Book Award.[3] Education[edit] Lansky graduated from Hampshire College in 1977 with a B.A. in modern Jewish history, and went on to a graduate program in East European Jewish studies at McGill University in Montreal.[2] Notes[edit]^ Aaron Lansky. Contemporary Authors Online. Detroit: Gale. 2008.  ^ a b "Aaron Lansky, founder and president"
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Daniel Libeskind
Daniel Libeskind
Daniel Libeskind
(born May 12, 1946) is a Polish-American architect, artist, professor and set designer
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