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National Audubon Society
The National Audubon Society
National Audubon Society
(Audubon) is a non-profit environmental organization dedicated to conservation. Located in the United States and incorporated in 1905, Audubon is one of the oldest of such organizations in the world and uses science, education and grassroots advocacy to advance its conservation mission. It is named in honor of John James Audubon, a Franco-American ornithologist and naturalist who painted, cataloged, and described the birds of North America in his famous book Birds of America published in sections between 1827 and 1838. The society has nearly 500 local chapters, each of which is an independent 501(c)(3) non-profit organization voluntarily affiliated with the National Audubon Society, which often organize birdwatching field trips and conservation-related activities
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Non-profit Organization
A non-profit organization (NPO), also known as a non-business entity[1] or non-profit institution,[2] is dedicated to furthering a particular social cause or advocating for a shared point of view. In economic terms, it is an organization that uses its surplus of the revenues to further achieve its ultimate objective, rather than distributing its income to the organization's shareholders, leaders, or members. Non-profits are tax exempt or charitable, meaning they do not pay income tax on the money that they receive for their organization. They can operate in religious, scientific, research, or educational settings. The key aspects of nonprofits is accountability, trustworthiness, honesty, and openness to every person who has invested time, money, and faith into the organization. Nonprofit organizations are accountable to the donors, funders, volunteers, program recipients, and the public community
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East Los Angeles, California
East Los Angeles, or East L.A., is an unincorporated area in Los Angeles County, California. It is 96.7% Latino
Latino
- the highest percentage of the 272 neighborhoods of Los Angeles
Los Angeles
County.[3]Contents1 Geography 2 Population2.1 2010 2.2 20003 Transportation 4 Government and infrastructure 5 Education5.1 Primary and secondary schools5.1.1 Public schools 5.1.2 Private schools 5.1.3 Charter schools5.2 Public libraries6 Latino
Latino
Walk of Fame 7 East L.A. Mexican Independence Day Parade
Parade
and Festival 8 East LA Farmers Market 9 Veterans memorial 10 Parks and recreation 11 Climate 12 Notable people 13 See also 14 References 15 External linksGeography[edit] East L.A
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Manhattan
Coordinates: 40°47′25″N 73°57′35″W / 40.79028°N 73.95972°W / 40.79028; -73.95972Manhattan New York CountyBorough of New York City County of New York StateView from Midtown Manhattan facing south toward Lower ManhattanFlagEtymology: Lenape: Manna-hata (island of many hills)Nickname(s): The City[1]Location of Manhattan, shown in red, in New York CityCoordinates: 40°43′42″N 73°59′39″W / 40.72833°N 73.99417°W / 40.72833; -73.99417Country  United StatesState  New YorkCounty New York (Coterminous)City  New YorkSettled 1624Government • Type Borough (New York City) • Borough President Gale Brewer
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William Dutcher
William Dutcher
William Dutcher
(20 January 1846 - 1 July 1920) was an American businessman, amateur bird photographer, ornithologist and a keen proponent of bird conservation. Working in a New York insurance company, he provided support to the American Ornithologists' Union (AOU) in its early years by serving as its treasurer and by working with government agencies to help pass key legislations for the protection of birds and the establishment of bird reserves.Dutcher in 1916 William Dutcher
William Dutcher
was born to Reverend Jacob Conklin and Margaretta Ayres Dutcher in Stelton, New Jersey. The family moved to Coxsackie and later Owasco where William studied for a few years. At the age of thirteen he began to work for a banker on Bond Street
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Great Auk
The great auk (Pinguinus impennis) is a species of flightless alcid that became extinct in the mid-19th century. It was the only modern species in the genus Pinguinus. It is unrelated to the birds now known as penguins, which were discovered later and so named by sailors because of their physical resemblance to the great auk. It bred on rocky, isolated islands with easy access to the ocean and a plentiful food supply, a rarity in nature that provided only a few breeding sites for the great auks. When not breeding, they spent their time foraging in the waters of the North Atlantic, ranging as far south as northern Spain and along the coastlines of Canada, Greenland, Iceland, the Faroe Islands, Norway, Ireland, and Great Britain. The great auk was 75 to 85 cm (30 to 33 in) tall and weighed about 5 kg (11 lb), making it the second-largest member of the alcid family ( Miomancalla
Miomancalla
was larger).[4] It had a black back and a white belly
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Guy Bradley
Guy Morrell Bradley (April 25, 1870 – July 8, 1905) was an American game warden and deputy sheriff for Monroe County, Florida. Born in Chicago, Illinois, he relocated to Florida with his family when he was young. As a boy, he often served as guide to visiting fishermen and plume hunters, although he later denounced poaching after legislation was passed to protect the dwindling number of birds. In 1902, Bradley was hired by the American Ornithologists' Union, at the request of the Florida Audubon Society, to become one of the country's first game wardens. Tasked with protecting the area's wading birds from hunters, he patrolled the area stretching from Florida's west coast, through the Everglades, to Key West, single-handedly enforcing the ban on bird hunting.[1] Bradley was shot and killed in the line of duty, after confronting a man and his two sons who were hunting egrets in the Everglades
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Theodore Roosevelt
United States Army New York Army National GuardYears of service 1882–1886, 1898Rank ColonelCommands held 1st United States Volunteer CavalryBattles/wars Spanish–American War  • Battle of Las Guasimas  • Battle of San Juan HillAwards Medal of Honor (Posthumously; 2001)This article is part of a series about Theodore RooseveltPolitical positions Electoral historyEarly life Family The Naval War of 1812Rough RidersBattle of San Juan HillGovernor of New YorkGovernorship "The Strenuous Life"Vice President of the United States1900 McKinley-Roosevelt campaign"Speak softly and carry a big stick"President of the United States PresidencyFirst termMcKinley assassination 1st inaugurationSquare Deal West Wing Coal strike Booker T. Washington
Booker T

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Migratory Bird Treaty Act Of 1918
The Migratory Bird Treaty
Migratory Bird Treaty
Act of 1918 (MBTA), codified at 16 U.S.C. §§ 703–712 (although §709 is omitted), is a United States
United States
federal law, first enacted in 1916 to implement the convention for the protection of migratory birds between the United States and Great Britain
Great Britain
(acting on behalf of Canada).[1] The statute makes it unlawful without a waiver to pursue, hunt, take, capture, kill, or sell birds listed therein as migratory birds. The statute does not discriminate between live or dead birds and also grants full protection to any bird parts including feathers, eggs, and nests. Over 800 species are currently on the list.[2] Some exceptions to the act, including the eagle feather law, are enacted in federal regulations (50 C.F.R
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National Wildlife Refuge
National Wildlife Refuge
National Wildlife Refuge
System is a designation for certain protected areas of the United States
United States
managed by the United States
United States
Fish and Wildlife Service. The National Wildlife Refuge
National Wildlife Refuge
System is the system of public lands and waters set aside to conserve America's fish, wildlife and plants
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Greenwich, Connecticut
Greenwich
Greenwich
/ˈɡrɛnɪtʃ/ is an affluent town in Fairfield County, Connecticut, United States.[1] As of the 2010 census, the town had a total population of 61,171.[2] The largest town on Connecticut's Gold Coast, it is home to many hedge funds and other financial service companies. Greenwich
Greenwich
is the southernmost and westernmost municipality in Connecticut
Connecticut
as well as the six-state region of New England
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California
Native languages as of 2007English 57.4%[2] Spanish 28.5%[3] Chinese 2.8%[3] Filipino 2.2%[3]Demonym CalifornianCapital SacramentoLargest city Los AngelesLargest metro Greater Los Angeles
Los Angeles
AreaArea Ranked 3rd • Total 163,696 sq mi (423,970 km2) • Width 250 miles (400 km) • Length 770 miles (1,240 km) • % water 4.7 • Latitude 32°32′ N to 42° N • Longitude 114°8′ W to 124
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John Greenleaf Whittier
John Greenleaf Whittier
John Greenleaf Whittier
(December 17, 1807 – September 7, 1892) was an American Quaker poet and advocate of the abolition of slavery in the United States. Frequently listed as one of the Fireside Poets, he was influenced by the Scottish poet Robert Burns
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Phoenix, Arizona
Phoenix (/ˈfiːnɪks/) is the capital and most populous city in Arizona, with 1,660,272 people (as of 2018[update]). It is also the fifth most populous city in the United States, and the only state capital with a population of more than one million residents.[5][6] Phoenix is the anchor of the Phoenix metropolitan area, also known as the Valley of the Sun, which in turn is part of the Salt River Valley. The metropolitan area is the 11th largest by population in the United States, with approximately 4.73 million people as of 2017[update].[7] Phoenix is the seat of Maricopa County and the largest city in the state at 517.9 square miles (1,341 km2), more than twice the size of Tucson and one of the largest cities in the United States.[8] Phoenix was settled in 1867 as an agricultural community near the confluence of the Salt and Gila Rivers and was incorporated as a city in 1881
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Seattle, Washington
Seattle
Seattle
(/siˈætəl/ ( listen)) is a seaport city on the west coast of the United States. It is the seat of King County, Washington. With an estimated 713,700 residents as of 2017[update],[3] Seattle
Seattle
is the largest city in both the state of Washington and the Pacific Northwest
Pacific Northwest
region of North America. In July 2013, it was the fastest-growing major city in the United States[7] and remained in the Top 5 in May 2015 with an annual growth rate of 2.1%.[8] In July 2016, Seattle
Seattle
was again the fastest-growing major U.S. city, with a 3.1% annual growth rate.[9] The city is situated on an isthmus between Puget Sound
Puget Sound
(an inlet of the Pacific Ocean) and Lake Washington, about 100 miles (160 km) south of the Canada– United States
United States
border
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Great Depression
The Great Depression
Great Depression
was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression
Great Depression
varied across nations; in most countries, it started in 1929 and lasted until the late 1930s.[1] It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century.[2] In the 21st century, the Great Depression
Great Depression
is commonly used as an example of how intensely the world's economy can decline.[3] The Great Depression
Great Depression
started in the United States
United States
after a major fall in stock prices that began around September 4, 1929, and became worldwide news with the stock market crash of October 29, 1929, (known as Black Tuesday)
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