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Napoleon Hill
Oliver Napoleon Hill
Napoleon Hill
(born October 26, 1883 – November 8, 1970) was an American self-help author
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George Safford Parker
George Safford Parker (November 1, 1863, in Shullsburg, Wisconsin
Shullsburg, Wisconsin
– July 19, 1937, in Chicago, Illinois) was an American inventor and industrialist. Parker was a telegraphy instructor in Janesville, Wisconsin, and had a sideline repairing and selling fountain pens. Dismayed by the unreliability of the pens, he experimented with ways to prevent ink leaks. In 1888, Parker founded the Parker Pen
Pen
Company. The next year he received his first fountain pen patent. By 1908, his factory on Main Street in Janesville was reportedly the largest pen manufacturing facility in the world. Parker eventually became one of the world's premier pen brands, and one of the first brands with a global presence. George S
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Thomas Edison
Thomas Alva Edison (February 11, 1847 – October 18, 1931) was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor.[1][2][3] He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park",[4] he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.[5] Edison was a prolific inventor, holding 1,093 US patents in his name, as well as many patents in the United Kingdom, France, and Germany. More significant than the number of Edison's patents was the widespread impact of his inventions: electric light and power utilities, sound recording, and motion pictures all established major new industries worldwide
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Florida
Florida
Florida
(/ˈflɒrɪdə/ ( listen); Spanish for "land of flowers") is the southernmost contiguous state in the United States. The state is bordered to the west by the Gulf of Mexico, to the northwest by Alabama, to the north by Georgia, to the east by the Atlantic Ocean, and to the south by the Straits of Florida. Florida
Florida
is the 22nd-most extensive (65,755 sq mi—170,304 km2), the 3rd-most populous (20,984,400 inhabitants),[11] and the 8th-most densely populated (384.3/sq mi—121.0/km2) of the U.S. states. Jacksonville is the most populous municipality in the state and the largest city by area in the contiguous United States. The Miami metropolitan area is Florida's most populous urban area. Tallahassee is the state's capital. About two-thirds of Florida
Florida
occupies a peninsula between the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean
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Rags-to-riches
Rags to riches refers to any situation in which a person rises from poverty to wealth, and in some cases from absolute obscurity to heights of fame—sometimes instantly
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Manuel L. Quezon
Manuel L. Quezon
Quezon
(born Manuel Luís Quezon
Quezon
y Molina; August 19, 1878 – August 1, 1944) was a Filipino statesman, soldier, and politician who served as president of the Commonwealth of the Philippines
Philippines
from 1935 to 1944. He was the first Filipino to head a government of the entire Philippines
Philippines
(as opposed to the government of previous Philippine states), and is considered to have been the second president of the Philippines, after Emilio Aguinaldo
Emilio Aguinaldo
(1899–1901). During his presidency, Quezon
Quezon
tackled the problem of landless peasants in the countryside
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The Golden Rule
The Golden Rule
Golden Rule
(which can be considered a law of reciprocity in some religions) is the principle of treating others as one would wish to be treated
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Norman Vincent Peale
Norman Vincent Peale
Norman Vincent Peale
(May 31, 1898 – December 24, 1993) was an American minister and author known for his work in popularizing the concept of positive thinking, especially through his best-selling book The Power of Positive Thinking. He served as the pastor of Marble Collegiate Church, New York, from 1932 until his death, leading a Reformed Church in America
Reformed Church in America
congregation. Peale was a personal friend of President Richard Nixon. President Donald Trump
Donald Trump
attended Peale's church while growing up, as well as marrying his first wife Ivana there
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John C. Maxwell
John Calvin Maxwell (born 1947) is an American author, speaker, and pastor who has written many books, primarily focusing on leadership. Titles include The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership
The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership
and The 21 Indispensable Qualities of a Leader. His books have sold millions of copies, with some on the New York Times
New York Times
Best Seller List.[1][2]Contents1 Personal life 2 Career 3 Selected bibliography 4 Notes 5 External linksPersonal life[edit] Maxwell was born in Garden City, MI
Garden City, MI
in 1947.[3] An evangelical Christian, he followed his father into the ministry. He completed a bachelor's degree at Ohio Christian University
Ohio Christian University
in 1969, a Master of Divinity degree at Azusa Pacific University, and a Doctor of Ministry degree at Fuller Theological Seminary
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Andrew Carnegie
Andrew Carnegie
Andrew Carnegie
(/kɑːrˈneɪɡi/ kar-NAY-gee, but commonly /ˈkɑːrnəɡi/ KAR-nə-ghee or /kɑːrˈnɛɡi/ kar-NEG-ee;[3] November 25, 1835 – August 11, 1919) was a Scottish-American industrialist, business magnate, and philanthropist. Carnegie led the expansion of the American steel industry in the late 19th century and is often identified as one of the richest people (and richest Americans).[4] He became a leading philanthropist in the United States and in the British Empire. During the last 18 years of his life, he gave away about $350 million[5][note 1] to charities, foundations, and universities—almost 90 percent of his fortune. His 1889 article proclaiming "The Gospel of Wealth" called on the rich to use their wealth to improve society, and stimulated a wave of philanthropy. Carnegie was born in Dunfermline, Scotland, and emigrated to the United States with his parents in 1848
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Henry Ford
Henry Ford
Henry Ford
(July 30, 1863 – April 7, 1947) was an American captain of industry and a business magnate, the founder of the Ford Motor Company, and the sponsor of the development of the assembly line technique of mass production. Although Ford did not invent the automobile or the assembly line,[1] he developed and manufactured the first automobile that many middle-class Americans could afford. In doing so, Ford converted the automobile from an expensive curiosity into a practical conveyance that would profoundly impact the landscape of the 20th century. His introduction of the Model T
Model T
automobile revolutionized transportation and American industry. As the owner of the Ford Motor Company, he became one of the richest and best-known people in the world. He is credited with "Fordism": mass production of inexpensive goods coupled with high wages for workers. Ford had a global vision, with consumerism as the key to peace
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Alexander Graham Bell
Alexander Graham Bell
Alexander Graham Bell
(March 3, 1847 – August 2, 1922)[4] was a Scottish-born[N 2] scientist, inventor, engineer, and innovator who is credited with patenting the first practical telephone[7] and founding the American Telephone
Telephone
and Telegraph
Telegraph
Company (AT&T) in 1885.[8][9] Bell's father, grandfather, and brother had all been associated with work on elocution and speech and both his mother and wife were deaf, profoundly influencing Bell's life's work.[10] His research on hearing and speech further led him to experiment with hearing devices which eventually culminated in Bell being awarded the first U.S
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Luther Burbank
Luther Burbank
Luther Burbank
(March 7, 1849 – April 11, 1926)[1] was an American botanist, horticulturist and pioneer in agricultural science. He developed more than 800 strains and varieties of plants over his 55-year career. Burbank's varied creations included fruits, flowers, grains, grasses, and vegetables. He developed (but did not create) a spineless cactus (useful for cattle-feed) and the plumcot. Burbank's most successful strains and varieties include the Shasta daisy, the fire poppy (note possible confusion with the California wildflower, Papaver californicum, which is also called a fire poppy), the "July Elberta" peach, the "Santa Rosa" plum, the "Flaming Gold" nectarine, the "Wickson" plum (named after the agronomist Edward J. Wickson), the freestone peach, and the white blackberry. A natural genetic variant of the Burbank potato with russet-colored skin later became known as the russet Burbank potato
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South Carolina
South Carolina
South Carolina
(/ˌkærəˈlaɪnə/ (listen)) is a state in the Southeastern United States
United States
and the easternmost of the Deep South. It is bordered to the north by North Carolina, to the southeast by the Atlantic Ocean, and to the southwest by Georgia across the Savannah River. South Carolina
South Carolina
became the eighth state to ratify the U.S. Constitution on May 23, 1788. South Carolina
South Carolina
became the first state to vote in favor of secession from the Union on December 20, 1860. After the American Civil War, it was readmitted into the United States
United States
on June 25, 1868. South Carolina
South Carolina
is the 40th most extensive and 23rd most populous U.S. state
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William H. Taft
William Howard Taft
William Howard Taft
(September 15, 1857 – March 8, 1930) served as the 27th President of the United States
President of the United States
(1909–1913) and as the tenth Chief Justice of the United States
Chief Justice of the United States
(1921–1930), the only person to have held both offices. Taft was elected president in 1908, the chosen successor of Theodore Roosevelt, but was defeated for re-election by Woodrow Wilson
Woodrow Wilson
in 1912 after Roosevelt split the Republican vote by running as a third-party candidate. In 1921, President Warren G. Harding appointed Taft to be chief justice, a position in which he served until a month before his death. Taft was born in Cincinnati
Cincinnati
in 1857. His father, Alphonso Taft, was a U.S. Attorney General and Secretary of War
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Cyrus H. K. Curtis
Cyrus Hermann Kotzschmar Curtis (June 18, 1850 – June 7, 1933) was an American publisher of magazines and newspapers, including the Ladies' Home Journal
Ladies' Home Journal
and The Saturday Evening Post.[2]Contents1 Biography 2 Philanthropy 3 Gallery 4 External links 5 Notes 6 ReferencesBiography[edit] Born in Portland, Maine, Curtis was forced to leave high school after his first year to start working, as in 1866 his family lost their home in the Great Fire of Portland. He held a variety of newspaper and advertising jobs in Portland and Boston before starting his first publication, a weekly called the People's Ledger, in Boston in 1872. In 1876, he moved to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, then a major publishing center, to reduce his printing costs.[2][3] Curtis's first wife was Louisa Knapp. In 1883, Knapp contributed a one-page supplement to the Tribune and Farmer, a magazine published by Curtis
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