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Naples National Archaeological Museum
The National Archaeological Museum of Naples
Naples
(Italian: Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli, sometimes abbreviated to MANN) is an important Italian archaeological museum, particularly for ancient Roman remains. Its collection includes works from Greek, Roman and Renaissance
Renaissance
times, and especially Roman artifacts from nearby Pompeii, Stabiae
Stabiae
and Herculaneum. It was formerly the Real Museo Borbonico ("royal Bourbon museum").Contents1 Building 2 Collections2.1 Marbles 2.2 Bronzes from the Villa of the Papyri 2.3 Mosaics 2.4 Egyptian Collection 2.5 Secret Cabinet3 Gallery 4 References 5 External linksBuilding[edit] The building was built as a cavalry barracks in 1585. From 1616 to 1777 it was the seat of the University of Naples
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Mosaic
A mosaic is a piece of art or image made from the assemblage of small pieces of colored glass, stone, or other materials. It is often used in decorative art or as interior decoration. Most mosaics are made of small, flat, roughly square, pieces of stone or glass of different colors, known as tesserae. Some, especially floor mosaics, are made of small rounded pieces of stone, and called "pebble mosaics". Mosaics have a long history, starting in Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
in the 3rd millennium BC. Pebble mosaics were made in Tiryns
Tiryns
in Mycenean Greece; mosaics with patterns and pictures became widespread in classical times, both in Ancient Greece
Ancient Greece
and Ancient Rome. Early Christian basilicas from the 4th century onwards were decorated with wall and ceiling mosaics
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Engraved Gem
An engraved gem, frequently referred to as an intaglio, is a small and usually semi-precious gemstone that has been carved, in the Western tradition normally with images or inscriptions only on one face.[1] The engraving of gemstones was a major luxury art form in the Ancient world, and an important one in some later periods.[2] Strictly speaking, engraving means carving in intaglio (with the design cut into the flat background of the stone), but relief carvings (with the design projecting out of the background as in nearly all cameos) are also covered by the term. This article uses "cameo" in its strict sense, to denote a carving exploiting layers of differently coloured stone. The activity is also called gem carving and the artists gem-cutters. References to antique gems and intaglios in a jewellery context will almost always mean carved gems; when referring to monumental sculpture, counter-relief, meaning the same as "intaglio", is more likely to be used
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Hipparchus
Hipparchus
Hipparchus
of Nicaea
Nicaea
(/hɪˈpɑːrkəs/; Greek: Ἵππαρχος, Hipparkhos; c. 190 – c. 120 BC) was a Greek astronomer, geographer, and mathematician. He is considered the founder of trigonometry[1] but is most famous for his incidental discovery of precession of the equinoxes.[2] Hipparchus
Hipparchus
was born in Nicaea, Bithynia
Bithynia
(now İznik, Turkey), and probably died on the island of Rhodes. He is known to have been a working astronomer at least from 162 to 127 BC.[3] Hipparchus
Hipparchus
is considered the greatest ancient astronomical observer and, by some, the greatest overall astronomer of antiquity. He was the first whose quantitative and accurate models for the motion of the Sun
Sun
and Moon survive
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Star Catalog
A star catalogue (Commonwealth English) or star catalog (American English), is an astronomical catalogue that lists stars. In astronomy, many stars are referred to simply by catalogue numbers. There are a great many different star catalogues which have been produced for different purposes over the years, and this article covers only some of the more frequently quoted ones. Star
Star
catalogues were compiled by many different ancient peoples, including the Babylonians, Greeks, Chinese, Persians, and Arabs
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Heracles
Heracles
Heracles
(/ˈhɛrəkliːz/ HERR-ə-kleez; Greek: Ἡρακλῆς, Hēraklēs, from Hēra, "Hera"), born Alcaeus[1] (Ἀλκαῖος, Alkaios) or Alcides[2] (Ἀλκείδης, Alkeidēs), was a divine hero in Greek mythology, the son of Zeus
Zeus
and Alcmene, foster son of Amphitryon[3] and great-grandson and half-brother (as they are both sired by the god Zeus) of Perseus. He was the greatest of the Greek heroes, a paragon of masculinity, the ancestor of royal clans who claimed to be Heracleidae
Heracleidae
(Ἡρακλεῖδαι), and a champion of the Olympian order against chthonic monsters. In Rome and the modern West, he is known as Hercules, with whom the later Roman emperors, in particular Commodus
Commodus
and Maximian, often identified themselves
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Ancient Agora Of Athens
The Ancient Agora
Agora
of Classical Athens
Classical Athens
is the best-known example of an ancient Greek agora, located to the northwest of the Acropolis and bounded on the south by the hill of the Areopagus
Areopagus
and on the west by the hill known as the Agoraios Kolonos, also called Market Hill.[1] The Agora's initial use was for a commercial, assembly, or residential gathering place
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Athens
Athens
Athens
(/ˈæθɪnz/;[3] Greek: Αθήνα, Athína [aˈθina], Ancient Greek: Ἀθῆναι, Athênai [a.tʰɛ̂ː.nai̯]) is the capital and largest city of Greece
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Nesiotes
Kritios[pronunciation?] (Greek: Κριτίος) was an Athenian sculptor, probably a pupil of Antenor, working in the early 5th century BCE, whose manner is on the cusp of the Late Archaic and the Severe style
Severe style
of Early Classicism in Attica. He was the teacher of Myron. With Nesiotes (Νησιώτης) Kritios
Kritios
made the replacement of the Tyrannicides group[1] by Antenor, which had been carried off by the Persians in the first stage of the Greco-Persian Wars.[2] The new group stood in the Agora
Agora
of Athens and its composition is known from Roman copies. With Nesiotes Kritios
Kritios
made other statues, of bronze, dedicated on the Acropolis, of which only their inscribed bases remain to give testament
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Kritios
Kritios[pronunciation?] (Greek: Κριτίος) was an Athenian sculptor, probably a pupil of Antenor, working in the early 5th century BCE, whose manner is on the cusp of the Late Archaic and the Severe style
Severe style
of Early Classicism in Attica. He was the teacher of Myron. With Nesiotes (Νησιώτης) Kritios
Kritios
made the replacement of the Tyrannicides group[1] by Antenor, which had been carried off by the Persians in the first stage of the Greco-Persian Wars.[2] The new group stood in the Agora
Agora
of Athens and its composition is known from Roman copies. With Nesiotes Kritios
Kritios
made other statues, of bronze, dedicated on the Acropolis, of which only their inscribed bases remain to give testament
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Calamis (5th Century BC)
Calamis (fl. 5th century BC) was a sculptor of ancient Greece. He was possibly from Boeotia, but nothing certain is known of his life although he is credited with having lived in Athens, and his sculptures are representative of Athenian sculpture. Although none of his works survives, he is known for his talent and skill in sculpting animals, especially horses, as opposed to the human body.[1] He is known to have worked in marble, bronze, gold, and ivory, and was famed for statues of horses. According to Pausanias (9.16.1), Calamis produced a statue of Zeus Ammon
Zeus Ammon
for Pindar, and mentions a Hermes Criophorus for Tanagra
Tanagra
(9.22.1), which was later depicted on Roman coins of the city. His statue of Apollo
Apollo
Alexikakos stood in the Ceramicus
Ceramicus
of Athens
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Lorenzo Il Magnifico
Lorenzo de' Medici
Medici
(Italian pronunciation: [loˈrɛntso de ˈmɛːditʃi], 1 January 1449 – 8 April 1492[1]) was an Italian statesman, de facto ruler of the Florentine Republic
Florentine Republic
and the most powerful and enthusiastic patron of Renaissance
Renaissance
culture in Italy.[2][3][4] Also known as Lorenzo the Magnificent (Lorenzo il Magnifico [loˈrɛntso il maɲˈɲiːfiko]) by contemporary Florentines, he was a magnate, diplomat, politician and patron of scholars, artists and poets. As a patron, he is best known for his sponsorship of artists such as Botticelli
Botticelli
and Michelangelo
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Cosimo De' Medici
Cosimo di Giovanni de' Medici
Medici
(called 'the Elder' (Italian il Vecchio) and posthumously Father of the Nation ( Latin
Latin
pater patriae); 27 September 1389 – 1 August 1464) was an Italian banker and politician, the first member of the Medici
Medici
political dynasty that served as de facto rulers of Florence
Florence
during much of the Italian Renaissance
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Agate
Agate
Agate
/ˈæɡət/ is a rock consisting primarily of cryptocrystalline silica, chiefly chalcedony, alternating with microgranular quartz
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Ancient History
Ancient history
Ancient history
is the aggregate of past events[1] from the beginning of recorded human history and extending as far as the Early Middle Ages or the Post-classical Era. The span of recorded history is roughly 5,000 years, beginning with Sumerian Cuneiform
Cuneiform
script, the oldest discovered form of coherent writing from the protoliterate period around the 30th century BC.[2] The term classical antiquity is often used to refer to history in the Old World
Old World
from the beginning of recorded Greek history
Greek history
in 776 BC (First Olympiad). This roughly coincides with the traditional date of the founding of Rome in 753 BC, the beginning of the history of ancient Rome, and the beginning of the Archaic period in Ancient Greece
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Rome
Rome
Rome
(/roʊm/ ROHM; Italian: Roma i[ˈroːma]; Latin: Roma [ˈroːma]) is the capital of Italy
Italy
and a special comune (named Comune
Comune
di Roma Capitale). Rome
Rome
also serves as the capital of the Lazio
Lazio
region. With 2,874,558 residents in 1,285 km2 (496.1 sq mi),[1] it is also the country's most populated comune. It is the fourth-most populous city in the European Union
European Union
by population within city limits. It is the centre of the Metropolitan City of Rome, which has a population of 4.3 million residents.[2] Rome
Rome
is located in the central-western portion of the Italian Peninsula, within Lazio (Latium), along the shores of the Tiber
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