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Namesake
A namesake is a person named after another,[1][2][3] or more broadly, a thing (such as a company, place, ship, building, or concept) named after a person.[2][4] According to the Oxford English Dictionary, a namesake is also defined as "a person or thing having the same name as another".[5]Contents1 History 2 Usage 3 Family 4 Culture 5 Concepts 6 See also 7 ReferencesHistory[edit] The word is first recorded in the mid-17th century, and probably comes from the phrase "for [the, my, his, her] name's sake".[5][2][3][6] Usage[edit] In general, the second recipient of a name, named for the first, is said to be the namesake of the first
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Teddy Bear
A teddy bear is a soft toy in the form of a bear. Developed apparently simultaneously by toymakers Morris Michtom
Morris Michtom
in the U.S. and Richard Steiff in Germany in the early years of the 20th century, and named after President Theodore "Teddy" Roosevelt, the teddy bear became an iconic children's toy, celebrated in story, song, and film.[1] Since the creation of the first teddy bears which sought to imitate the form of real bear cubs, "teddies" have greatly varied in form, style, color, and material
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Trump Tower (other)
Trump Tower
Trump Tower
is a mixed-use skyscraper located in Midtown Manhattan in New York City. Trump Tower
Trump Tower
or Trump Towers may also refer to:Conten
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JSTOR
JSTOR
JSTOR
(/ˈdʒeɪstɔːr/;[3] short for Journal Storage) is a digital library founded in 1995. Originally containing digitized back issues of academic journals, it now also includes books and other primary sources, and current issues of journals.[4] It provides full-text searches of almost 2,000 journals. As of 2013[update], more than 8,000 institutions in more than 160 countries had access to JSTOR;[5] most access is by subscription, but some of the site's public domain and open access content is available at no cost to anyone.[6] JSTOR's revenue was $86 million in 2015.[7]Contents1 History 2 Content 3 Access3.1 Aaron Swartz
Aaron Swartz
incident 3.2 Limitations 3.3 Increasing public access4 Use 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksHistory[edit] William G
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a digital object identifier (DOI) is a persistent identifier or handle used to identify objects uniquely, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to identify their referents uniquely
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Protected Geographical Status
Three European Union
European Union
schemes of geographical indications and traditional specialties, known as protected designation of origin (PDO), protected geographical indication (PGI), and traditional specialities guaranteed (TSG), promote and protect names of quality agricultural products and foodstuffs.[1] Products registered under one of the three schemes may be marked with the logo for that scheme to help identify those products. The schemes are based on the legal framework provided by the EU Regulation No 1151/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 November 2012 on quality schemes for agricultural products and foodstuffs.[2] This regulation (enforced within the EU and being gradually expanded internationally via bilateral agreements between the EU and non-EU countries) ensures that only products genuinely originating in that region are allowed to be identified as such in commerce. The legislation first came into force in 1992
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List Of Places Named After Joseph Stalin
During Joseph Stalin's rule (1922–1953), many places, mostly cities, in the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
and other communist countries were named or renamed in honour of him as part of the cult of personality surrounding him. Most of these places had their names changed back to the original ones shortly after the 20th Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
in 1956, or after the beginning of destalinisation in 1961. In some countries, including those in the West, there are streets, squares, etc. named after Stalingrad (and hence indirectly after Stalin), in honour of the courage shown by the defenders at the battle of Stalingrad against Nazi Germany
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Code Name
A code name or cryptonym is a word or name used, sometimes clandestinely, to refer to another name, word, project or person. Names are often used for military purposes, or in espionage. They may also be used in industrial counter-industrial espionage to protect secret projects and the like from business rivals, or to give names to projects whose marketing name has not yet been determined
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Sarah Bernhardt
Sarah Bernhardt
Sarah Bernhardt
(French: [saʁa bɛʁnɑʁt];[note 1] 22 or 23 October 1844 – 26 March 1923) was a French stage actress who starred in some of the most popular French plays of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, including La Dame Aux Camelias
La Dame Aux Camelias
by Alexandre Dumas, fils, Ruy Blas
Ruy Blas
by Victor Hugo, Fédora
Fédora
and La Tosca
La Tosca
by Victorien Sardou, and L'Aiglon
L'Aiglon
by Edmond Rostand. She also played male roles, including Shakespeare's Hamlet. Rostand called her "the queen of the pose and the princess of the gesture", while Hugo praised her "golden voice"
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Fédora
Fédora
Fédora
is a play by the French author Victorien Sardou. The first production in 1882 starred Sarah Bernhardt
Sarah Bernhardt
in the title role of Princess Fédora
Fédora
Romazov
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Fedora
A fedora /fɪˈdɔːrə/[1] is a hat with a soft brim and indented crown.[2][1] It is typically creased lengthwise down the crown and "pinched" near the front on both sides.[3] Fedoras can also be creased with teardrop crowns, diamond crowns, center dents, and others, and the positioning of pinches can vary. The typical crown height is 4.5 inches (11 cm). The brim is usually approximately 2.5 inches (6.4 cm) wide, but may be wider,[2] can be left "raw edged" (left as cut), finished with a sewn overwelt or underwelt, or bound with a trim-ribbon. "Stitched edge" means that there is one, two or more rows of stitching radiating inward toward the crown. The "Cavanagh Edge" is a welted edge with invisible stitching to hold it in place and is a very expensive treatment that can no longer be performed by modern hat factories.[4] The term fedora was in use as early as 1891
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Theodore Roosevelt
United States Army New York Army National GuardYears of service 1882–1886, 1898Rank ColonelCommands held 1st United States Volunteer CavalryBattles/wars Spanish–American War  • Battle of Las Guasimas  • Battle of San Juan HillAwards Medal of Honor (Posthumously; 2001)This article is part of a series about Theodore RooseveltPolitical positions Electoral historyEarly life Family The Naval War of 1812Rough RidersBattle of San Juan HillGovernor of New YorkGovernorship "The Strenuous Life"Vice President of the United States1900 McKinley-Roosevelt campaign"Speak softly and carry a big stick"President of the United States PresidencyFirst termMcKinley assassination 1st inaugurationSquare Deal West Wing Coal strike Booker T. Washington
Booker T

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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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Ford Motor Company
Coordinates: 42°18′53″N 83°12′38″W / 42.31472°N 83.21056°W / 42.31472; -83.21056Ford Motor CompanyThe Ford World Headquarters
Ford World Headquarters
in Dearborn, Michigan, also known as the Glass HouseTypePublicTraded asNYSE: FS&P 100 ComponentS&P 500 ComponentIndustryAutomotiveFoundedJune 16, 1903; 116 years ago (1903-06-16)[1]FounderHenry FordHeadquartersDearborn, Michigan, U.S.Area servedWorldwideKey peopleWilliam Clay Ford Jr.(Executive Chairman)Jim Hackett(President & CEO)ProductsAutomo
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Sephardic Jews
Sephardi Jews, also known as Sephardic
Sephardic
Jews
Jews
or Sephardim (Hebrew: סְפָרַדִּים‬, Modern Hebrew: Sfaraddim, Tiberian: Səp̄āraddîm; also יְהוּדֵי סְפָרַד‬ Y'hudey Spharad, lit. "The Jews
Jews
of Spain"), are a Jewish ethnic division whose ethnogenesis and emergence as a distinct community of Jews
Jews
coalesced during the early Middle Ages on the Iberian Peninsula
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