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Name Of Toronto
The name of Toronto
Toronto
has a history distinct from that of the city itself. Originally, the term "Taronto" referred to a channel of water between Lake Simcoe
Lake Simcoe
and Lake Couchiching, but in time the name passed southward, and was eventually applied to a new fort at the mouth of the Humber River. Fort Toronto
Toronto
was the first settlement in the area, and lent its name to what became the city of Toronto. John Graves Simcoe
John Graves Simcoe
identified the area as a strategic location to base a new capital for Upper Canada, believing Newark to be susceptible to American invasion. A garrison was established at Garrison Creek, on the western entrance to the docks of Toronto
Toronto
Harbour, in 1793; this later became Fort York
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History Of Toronto
The history of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, begins several millennia ago. Archaeological finds in the area have found artifacts of First Nations dating back several thousand years. Prior to 1000 AD, the Wyandot people were likely the first group to live in the area, followed by the Iroquois. When Europeans first came to Toronto, they found a small village known as Teiaiagon
Teiaiagon
on the banks of the Humber River. Between visits by European explorers, the village was abandoned by the Iroquois, who moved south of Lake Ontario
Ontario
and the Mississaugas, a branch of the Ojibwa settled along the north shore of the lake. The French first set up trading posts in the area, including Fort Rouillé in 1750, which they abandoned as the British conquered French North America. In 1786, Lord Dorchester arrived in Quebec City as Governor-in-Chief of British North America
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Mnjikaning Fish Weirs
The Mnjikaning Fish Weirs are one of the oldest human developments in Canada. These fishing weirs were built by the first nations people well before recorded history, dating to about 3,300 BCE during the Archaic period in North America,[1] according to carbon dating done on some of the wooden remnants. The weirs were built in the narrows between Lake Couchiching and Lake Simcoe, now known as Atherley Narrows,[1] over which Ontario Highway 12 passes today. They were preserved by the water and layers of protective silt. The weirs were built as fences using local wood species, including eastern white cedar, sugar maple, and white birch for the stakes.[2] The weirs were used to trap the various fish species swimming through them
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Prince Frederick, Duke Of York And Albany
Napoleonic WarsWar of the Third Coalition Anglo-Spanish War (1796–1808) War of the Fourth Coalition Anglo-Turkish War (1807–09) Peninsular War War of the Fifth Coalition War of the Sixth Coalition War of the Seventh CoalitionWar of 1812Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany
Duke of York and Albany
KG GMB GCH (Frederick Augustus; 16 August 1763 – 5 January 1827) was the second son and child of George III, King of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and Hanover, and his consort Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. A soldier by profession, from 1764 to 1803 he was Prince-Bishop of Osnabrück
Prince-Bishop of Osnabrück
in the Holy Roman Empire
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York County, Ontario
York County is a historic county in Upper Canada, Canada
Canada
West, and the Canadian province of Ontario. York County was created on 16 June 1792[1] and was part of the jurisdiction of the Home District
Home District
of Upper Canada. It originally comprised all of what is now the regional municipalities of York, Peel, and Halton, and the city of Toronto, as well as parts of Durham Regional Municipality and the city of Hamilton. Toronto
Toronto
was the county seat. In 1816, Wentworth and Halton counties were created (split) from York County
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Regional Municipality Of York
The Regional Municipality of York, also called York Region, is a regional municipality in Southern Ontario, Canada, between Lake Simcoe and Toronto. It replaced the former York County in 1971, and is part of the Greater Toronto
Toronto
Area and the inner ring of the Golden Horseshoe
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Yorkville, Toronto
Yorkville is an affluent neighbourhood in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. It is roughly bounded by Bloor Street
Bloor Street
to the south, Davenport Road
Davenport Road
to the north, Yonge Street
Yonge Street
to the east and Avenue Road
Avenue Road
to the west, and is considered part of 'The Annex' neighbourhood officially. Established as a separate village in 1830, it was annexed into Toronto
Toronto
in 1883. Yorkville is diverse, comprising residential areas, office space, and an array of shopping options. Within the Yorkville district is one of Canada's most exclusive shopping districts, anchored by the Mink Mile
Mink Mile
along Bloor Street. In 2006, Mink Mile
Mink Mile
was the 22nd most expensive street in the world, with rents of $208 per square foot
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East York
East York, formally the Borough of East York
East York
is a former municipality within the City of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. It was a semi-autonomous borough within the overall municipality of Metropolitan Toronto
Toronto
until 1998, when it was amalgamated into the new "megacity" of Toronto. Before the amalgamation, it was Canada's only borough. It is separated by the Don River from the former City of Toronto. Traditional East York
East York
is southeast of the river, and the neighbourhoods of Leaside, Bennington Heights and densely populated Thorncliffe Park
Thorncliffe Park
are northwest of the river
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North York
North York
North York
is a suburban district in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. It is located directly north of Old Toronto, between Etobicoke
Etobicoke
to the west and Scarborough to the east. As of the 2011 Census, it had a population of 655,913. It was first created as a township in 1922 out of the northern part of the former city of York, a municipality that was located along the western border of Old Toronto. Following its inclusion in Metropolitan Toronto
Toronto
in 1954, it was one of the fastest growing parts of the region due to its proximity to Old Toronto. It was declared a borough in 1967, and later became a city in 1979, attracting high-density residences, rapid transit, and a number of corporate headquarters in North York
North York
City Centre, its central business district
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Wyandot People
The Wyandot people
Wyandot people
or Wendat, also called the Huron Nation and Huron people,[1][a] in most historic references are believed to have been the most populous confederacy of Iroquoian
Iroquoian
cultured indigenous peoples of North America. They traditionally spoke the Wyandot language, a Northern Iroquoian
Iroquoian
language and were believed to number over 30,000[1] at the time the first European trader-explorers made contact with them in the second decade of the 17th century. By the 15th century, the pre-contact Wyandots settled in the large area from the north shores of most of present-day Lake Ontario, northwards up to Georgian Bay
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Matchedash Bay
Matchedash Bay
Bay
is a bay and Ramsar wetland in Simcoe County
Simcoe County
in Central Ontario, Canada.[1][2] It is the "final inland extension of Severn Sound"[3] on Lake Huron's Georgian Bay, and is "situated at the interface between the Saint Lawrence Lowlands
Saint Lawrence Lowlands
and the Canadian Shield ".[4] It exhibits geologically unique features at the junction of the Canadian Shield
Canadian Shield
and southern Ontario
Ontario
limestone
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Mohawk People
The Mohawk people
Mohawk people
(who identify as Kanien'kehá:ka[2]) are the most easterly tribe of the Haudenosaunee, or Iroquois
Iroquois
Confederacy. They are an Iroquoian-speaking indigenous people of North America. The Mohawk were historically based in the Mohawk Valley
Mohawk Valley
in present-day upstate New York west of the Hudson River; their territory ranged north to the St. Lawrence River, southern Quebec
Quebec
and eastern Ontario; south to greater New Jersey
New Jersey
and into Pennsylvania; eastward to the Green Mountains of Vermont; and westward to the border with the Iroquoian Oneida Nation's traditional homeland territory. As one of the five original members of the Iroquois
Iroquois
League, the Mohawk were known as the Keepers of the Eastern Door
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Samuel De Champlain
Samuel
Samuel
de Champlain (French: [samɥɛl də ʃɑ̃plɛ̃] born Samuel
Samuel
Champlain; on or before August 13, 1574[2][Note 2][Note 1] – December 25, 1635), "The Father of New France", was a French navigator, cartographer, draftsman, soldier, explorer, geographer, ethnologist, diplomat, and chronicler. He made from 21-29 trips across the Atlantic[3], and founded New France
New France
and Quebec City
Quebec City
on July 3, 1608
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Toronto Carrying-Place Trail
The Toronto
Toronto
Carrying-Place Trail, also known as the Humber Portage
Portage
and the Toronto
Toronto
Passage, was a major portage route in Ontario, Canada, linking Lake Ontario
Ontario
with Lake Simcoe
Lake Simcoe
and the northern Great Lakes. The name comes from the Mohawk term toron-ten, meaning "the place where the trees grow over the water", an important landmark on Lake Simcoe through which the trail passed. From Lake Ontario, the trail ran northward along the eastern bank of the Humber River. It forked at Woodbridge, with one path crossing the east branch of the Humber and running along the west side of the river to the vicinity of Kleinburg, where it crossed the river again. This trail was probably used during the seasons when the water was low enough to ford
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Fort York
Fort York
Fort York
is a historic site of military fortifications and related buildings on the west side of downtown Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The fort was built by the British Army
British Army
and Canadian militia troops in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, to defend the settlement and the new capital of the Upper Canada
Canada
region from the threat of a military attack, principally from the newly independent United States
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Humber River (Ontario)
The Humber
Humber
River
River
(French: Rivière Humber) is a river in Southern Ontario, Canada.[1] It is in the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
Basin, is a tributary of Lake Ontario
Ontario
and is one of two major rivers on either side of the city of Toronto, the other being the Don River
River
to the east. It was designated a Canadian Heritage River
River
on September 24, 1999.[2] The Humber
Humber
collects from about 750 creeks and tributaries in a fan-shaped area north of Toronto
Toronto
that encompasses portions of Dufferin County, the Regional Municipality of Peel, Simcoe County, and the Regional Municipality of York
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