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Nakajima Sakae
The Nakajima Sakae
Nakajima Sakae
(栄, Prosperity) was a two-row, 14-cylinder air-cooled radial engine used in a number of combat aircraft of the Imperial Japanese Navy
Imperial Japanese Navy

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Mitsubishi
The Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Group (三菱グループ, Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Gurūpu, also known as the Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Group of Companies or Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Companies, and informally as the Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Keiretsu) is a group of autonomous Japanese multinational companies in a variety of industries. It is historically descended from the Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
zaibatsu, a unified company which existed from 1870, founded by Iwasaki Yatarō, to 1947 and was disbanded during the occupation of Japan
Japan
following World War II. The former constituents of the company continue to share the Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
brand, trademark, and legacy
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Kawasaki Ki-56
The Kawasaki Ki-56
Kawasaki Ki-56
(一式貨物輸送機, Type 1 Freight Transport) was a Japanese two-engine light transport aircraft used during World War II. It was known to the Allies by the reporting name "Thalia". 121 were built between 1940 and 1943.Contents1 Design and development 2 Operational history 3 Specifications (Ki-56) 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksDesign and development[edit] The Kawasaki Ki-56
Kawasaki Ki-56
was derived from the Lockheed Model 14 Super Electra aircraft that the Kawasaki Kokuki Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha (The Kawasaki Aircraft
Aircraft
Engineering Company Limited) had built under licence
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Imperial Japanese Army Air Service
Ministry of the Army Inspectorate General of AviationBranch  Imperial Japanese ArmyType Air forceRole Aerial warfarePart of Armed Forces of the Empire of JapanEngagements World War I Mukden Incident Sino-Japanese War Battles of Khalkhin Gol World War IICommandersCeremonial chief Emperor of JapanInsigniaRoundelThe Imperial Japanese Army
Imperial Japanese Army
Air Service or Imperial Japanese Army
Imperial Japanese Army
Air Force (IJAAS or IJAAF) (大日本帝國陸軍航空部隊, Dainippon Teikoku Rikugun Kōkūbutai) or, more literally, the Greater Japan Empire Army Air Corps, was the aviation force of the Imperial Japanese Army (IJA)
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Reciprocating Engine
A reciprocating engine, also often known as a piston engine, is typically a heat engine (although there are also pneumatic and hydraulic reciprocating engines) that uses one or more reciprocating pistons to convert pressure into a rotating motion. This article describes the common features of all types. The main types are: the internal combustion engine, used extensively in motor vehicles; the steam engine, the mainstay of the Industrial Revolution; and the niche application Stirling engine
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Power-to-weight Ratio
Power-to-weight ratio (or specific power or power-to-mass ratio) is a calculation commonly applied to engines and mobile power sources to enable the comparison of one unit or design to another. Power-to-weight ratio is a measurement of actual performance of any engine or power source. It is also used as a measurement of performance of a vehicle as a whole, with the engine's power output being divided by the weight (or mass) of the vehicle, to give a metric that is independent of the vehicle's size. Power-to-weight is often quoted by manufacturers at the peak value, but the actual value may vary in use and variations will affect performance. The inverse of power-to-weight, weight-to-power ratio (power loading) is a calculation commonly applied to aircraft, cars, and vehicles in general, to enable the comparison of one vehicle's performance to another
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Compression Ratio
The static compression ratio of an internal combustion engine or external combustion engine is a value that represents the ratio of the volume of its combustion chamber from its largest capacity to its smallest capacity. It is a fundamental specification for many common combustion engines. In a piston engine, it is the ratio between the volume of the cylinder and combustion chamber when the piston is at the bottom of its stroke, and the volume of the combustion chamber when the piston is at the top of its stroke.[1] For example, a cylinder and its combustion chamber with the piston at the bottom of its stroke may contain 1000 cc of air (900 cc in the cylinder plus 100 cc in the combustion chamber)
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Power Density
Power density (or volume power density or volume specific power) is the amount of power (time rate of energy transfer) per unit volume. In energy transformers including batteries, fuel cells, motors, etc., and also power supply units or similar, power density refers to a volume. It is then also called volume power density, which is expressed as W/m3. Volume
Volume
power density is sometimes an important consideration where space is constrained. In reciprocating internal combustion engines, power density—power per swept volume or brake horsepower per cubic centimeter —is an important metric. This is based on the internal capacity of the engine, not its external size. Power densities of common materials[edit]This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it
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Valvetrain
A valve train or valvetrain is a mechanical system that controls operation of the valves in an internal combustion engine,[1] in which a sequence of components transmits motion throughout the assembly
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Planes Of Fame Museum
Planes of Fame Air Museum
Planes of Fame Air Museum
is an aviation museum in Chino, California,[1][2][3] and Valle, Arizona.[4] The museum has many flying and static aircraft, along with multiple rare examples under restoration.Contents1 History 2 Collection 3 Monthly flights and annual airshows 4 Military vehicles 5 475th Fighter Group 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] Planes of Fame Air Museum
Planes of Fame Air Museum
was founded by Edward T. Maloney on January 12, 1957, in Claremont, California, to save historically important aircraft.[3] At that time, it was called "The Air Museum"
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Tachikawa Ki-74
The Tachikawa Ki-74
Tachikawa Ki-74
was a Japanese experimental long-range reconnaissance bomber of World War II. A twin-engine, mid-wing monoplane, it was developed for the Imperial Japanese Army Air Force but did not enter service.Contents1 Development 2 Operational history 3 Specifications (Ki-74) 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksDevelopment[edit] Though already conceived in 1939[4] as a long-range reconnaissance aircraft capable of reaching west of Lake Baikal
Lake Baikal
when operating from bases in Manchukuo
Manchukuo
(Manchuria), the prototype Ki-74 (designated as A-26 by Tachikawa) only first flew as late as in March 1944; it was powered by two 1,641 kW (2,201 hp) Mitsubishi Ha-211-I [Ha-43-I] radial engines
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Nakajima Ki-115
The Nakajima Ki-115
Nakajima Ki-115
Tsurugi (剣, "Sabre")[5] was a one-man kamikaze aircraft developed by the Imperial Japanese Army Air Force
Imperial Japanese Army Air Force
in the closing stages of World War II
World War II
in 1945
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Supercharger
A supercharger is an air compressor that increases the pressure or density of air supplied to an internal combustion engine
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Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service
Ministry of the Navy Navy Aviation Bureau (Kaigun Kōkū Hombu)Branch  Imperial Japanese NavyType Naval aviationEngagements World War I Sino-Japanese War World War IICommandersCeremonial chief Emperor of JapanNotable commanders Chuichi Nagumo, Minoru Genda, Mitsuo FuchidaInsigniaRoundelA formation of Japanese bombers taking anti-aircraft fire, seen from the Australian cruiser, HMAS Hobart.The Imperial Japanese Navy
Imperial Japanese Navy
Air Service (大日本帝國海軍航空隊, Dai-Nippon Teikoku Kaigun Kōkū-tai) was the air arm of the Imperial Japanese Navy. The organization was responsible for the operation of naval aircraft and the conduct of aerial warfare in the Pacific War. The Japanese military acquired their first aircraft in 1910 and followed the development of air combat during World War I
World War I
with great interest
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