HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Nagano, Nagano
Nagano (長野市, Nagano-shi, Japanese: [naꜜɡano]) is the capital city of Nagano Prefecture
Nagano Prefecture
in the Chūbu region
Chūbu region
of Japan. As of October 1, 2016, the city had an estimated population of 375,234 and a population density of 449 persons per km²
[...More...]

"Nagano, Nagano" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Uesugi Clan
The Uesugi clan
Uesugi clan
(上杉氏, Uesugi-shi) was a Japanese samurai clan, descended from the Fujiwara clan
Fujiwara clan
and particularly notable for their power in the Muromachi and Sengoku periods (roughly 14th through 17th centuries).[1] The clan was split into three branch families, the Ōgigayatsu, Inukake and Yamanouchi Uesugi, which boasted considerable influence. The Uesugi are perhaps best known for Uesugi Kenshin
Uesugi Kenshin
(1530–1578), originally from the Nagao clan, one of Sengoku's more prominent warlords
[...More...]

"Uesugi Clan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Uesugi Kenshin
Uesugi Kenshin
Uesugi Kenshin
(上杉 謙信, February 18, 1530 – April 19, 1578) was a daimyō who was born as Nagao Kagetora,[1] and after the adoption into the Uesugi clan, ruled Echigo Province
Echigo Province
in the Sengoku period of Japan.[2] He was one of the most powerful daimyōs of the Sengoku period. While chiefly remembered for his prowess on the battlefield, Kenshin is also regarded as an extremely skillful administrator who fostered the growth of local industries and trade; his rule saw a marked rise in the standard of living of Echigo.[citation needed] Kenshin is famed for his honourable conduct, his military expertise, a long-standing rivalry with Takeda Shingen, his numerous campaigns to restore order in the Kantō region
Kantō region
as the Kanto Kanrei, and his belief in the Buddhist god of war—Bishamonten
[...More...]

"Uesugi Kenshin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kai Province
Kai Province
Kai Province
(甲斐国, Kai-no-kuni) was a province of Japan in the area of Japan that is today Yamanashi Prefecture.[1] Kai bordered on Sagami, Suruga, Shinano and Musashi Provinces. Its abbreviated form name was Kōshū (甲州). The origin of its name is uncertain. It lies in central Honshū, west of Tokyo, in a landlocked mountainous region that includes Mount Fuji
Mount Fuji
along its border with modern Shizuoka Prefecture. Hiroshige
Hiroshige
ukiyo-e "Kai" in "The Famous Scenes of the Sixty States" (六十余州名所図会), depicting the Saruhashi, a bridge in what is now Ōtsuki, Yamanashi. Contents1 History 2 Historical districts 3 Highways 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Kai was one of the original provinces of Japan established in the Nara period under the Taihō Code. The original capital of the province was located in what is now Fuefuki
[...More...]

"Kai Province" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Takeda Clan
The Takeda clan
Takeda clan
(武田氏, Takeda-shi) was a Japanese clan active from the late Heian period
Heian period
until the late 16th century. The clan was historically based in Kai Province
Kai Province
in present-day Yamanashi Prefecture.[1][2] The clan was known for their honorable actions under the rule of Takeda Shingen, one of the most famous rulers of the period
[...More...]

"Takeda Clan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Echigo Province
Echigo Province
Echigo Province
(越後国, Echigo no kuni) was an old province in north-central Japan, on the shores of the Sea of Japan. It bordered on Uzen, Iwashiro, Kōzuke, Shinano, and Etchū Provinces.[1] It corresponds today to Niigata Prefecture, minus the island of Sado. Its abbreviated form name was Esshū (越州), with Echizen and Etchū Provinces
[...More...]

"Echigo Province" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Edo Period
The Edo
Edo
period (江戸時代, Edo
Edo
jidai) or Tokugawa period (徳川時代) is the period between 1603 and 1868 in the history of Japan, when Japanese society was under the rule of the Tokugawa shogunate and the country's 300 regional daimyō. The period was characterized by economic growth, strict social order, isolationist foreign policies, a stable population, "no more wars", and popular enjoyment of arts and culture. The shogunate was officially established in Edo
Edo
on March 24, 1603, by Tokugawa Ieyasu
[...More...]

"Edo Period" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sengoku Period
The Sengoku period
Sengoku period
(戦国時代, Sengoku Jidai, "Age of Warring States"; c. 1467 – c. 1603) is a period in Japanese history marked by social upheaval, political intrigue and near-constant military conflict
[...More...]

"Sengoku Period" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sea Of Japan
The Sea of Japan
Japan
(see below for other names) is a marginal sea between the Japanese archipelago, Sakhalin, the Korean Peninsula
Korean Peninsula
and Russia. The Japanese archipelago
Japanese archipelago
separates the sea from the Pacific Ocean. It is bordered by Japan, Korea
Korea
(North and South) and Russia. Like the Mediterranean Sea, it has almost no tides due to its nearly complete enclosure from the Pacific Ocean.[1] This isolation also reflects in the fauna species and in the water salinity, which is lower than in the ocean. The sea has no large islands, bays or capes. Its water balance is mostly determined by the inflow and outflow through the straits connecting it to the neighboring seas and Pacific Ocean
[...More...]

"Sea Of Japan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Edo
Edo
Edo
(江戸, "bay-entrance" or "estuary"), also romanized as Jedo, Yedo or Yeddo, is the former name of Tokyo.[2] It was the seat of power for the Tokugawa shogunate, which ruled Japan
Japan
from 1603 to 1868. During this period, it grew to become one of the largest cities in the world and home to an urban culture centered on the notion of a "floating world".[1]Contents1 History1.1 Magistrate2 Government and administration 3 Geography 4 Gallery 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External links8.1 HistoricHistory[edit] Main article: Edo
Edo
period From the establishment of the Tokugawa bakufu headquarters at Edo, the town became the de facto capital and center of political power, although Kyoto
Kyoto
remained the formal capital of the country
[...More...]

"Edo" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sanada Clan
The Sanada clan
Sanada clan
(真田氏, Sanada-shi) is a Japanese clan.[1] The Sanada were long associated with Matsushiro Domain
Matsushiro Domain
in modern-day Nagano Prefecture.Contents1 History1.1 Edo era 1.2 Modern era2 Family heads 3 Notable members 4 Notable retainers 5 Television 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The Sanada clan
Sanada clan
claimed descent from the Seiwa Genji.[1] Historically, the clan's banner was established by Unno Yukiyoshi in the early 16th century. He emblazoned the Rokumonsen on his banner
[...More...]

"Sanada Clan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Shukuba
Shukuba
Shukuba
(宿場) were post stations during the Edo period
Edo period
in Japan, generally located on one of the Edo Five Routes
Edo Five Routes
or one of its sub-routes. They were also called shuku-eki (宿駅). These post stations (or "post towns") were places where travelers could rest on their journey around the nation.[1] They were created based on policies for the transportation of goods by horseback that were developed during the Nara and Heian periods.Contents1 History 2 Post station facilities 3 Preserved and rebuilt post stations 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit]Nakasendō's Magome-jukuThese post stations were first established by Tokugawa Ieyasu
Tokugawa Ieyasu
shortly after the end of the Battle of Sekigahara
[...More...]

"Shukuba" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Buddhism
Buddhism
Buddhism
(/ˈbʊdɪzəm, ˈbuː-/)[1][2] is a religion[3][4] and dharma that encompasses a variety of traditions, beliefs and spiritual practices largely based on original teachings attributed to the Buddha and resulting interpreted philosophies. Buddhism
Buddhism
originated in Ancient India
India
sometime between the 6th and 4th centuries BCE, from where it spread through much of Asia, whereafter it declined in India
India
during the Middle Ages. Two major extant branches of Buddhism
Buddhism
are generally recognized by scholars: Theravada
Theravada
(Pali: "The School of the Elders") and Mahayana
Mahayana
(Sanskrit: "The Great Vehicle")
[...More...]

"Buddhism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nara Period
The Nara period
Nara period
(奈良時代, Nara jidai) of the history of Japan covers the years from AD 710 to 794.[1] Empress Genmei
Empress Genmei
established the capital of Heijō-kyō
Heijō-kyō
(present-day Nara). Except for a five-year period (740–745), when the capital was briefly moved again, it remained the capital of Japanese civilization until Emperor Kanmu established a new capital, Nagaoka-kyō, in 784, before moving to Heian-kyō, or Kyoto, a decade later in 794. Most of Japanese society during this period was agricultural in nature and centered on villages
[...More...]

"Nara Period" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Shinano Province
Shinano Province
Shinano Province
(信濃国, Shinano no kuni) or Shinshū (信州) is an old province of Japan
Japan
that is now Nagano Prefecture.[1] Shinano bordered on Echigo, Etchū, Hida, Kai, Kōzuke, Mikawa, Mino, Musashi, Suruga, and Tōtōmi Provinces
[...More...]

"Shinano Province" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Population Density
Population
Population
density (in agriculture: standing stock and standing crop) is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume; it is a quantity of type number density. It is frequently applied to living organisms, and most of the time to humans. It is a key geographical term.[1]Contents1 Biological population densities1.1 By political boundaries 1.2 Other methods of measurement2 See also2.1 Lists of entities by population density3 References 4 External linksBiological population densities[edit] Population
Population
density is population divided by total land area or water volume, as appropriate.[1] Low densities may cause an extinction vortex and lead to further reduced fertility. This is called the Allee effect
Allee effect
after the scientist who identified it
[...More...]

"Population Density" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.