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Naftali Zvi Of Ropshitz
Rabbi Naftali Zvi Horowitz of Ropshitz (May 22, 1760 – May 8, 1827)[1] was born on the day that the Baal Shem Tov
Baal Shem Tov
died, to Rabbi Menachem Mendel Rubin of Linsk. His mother Beila was the daughter of Rabbi Yitzchak Halevi Horowitz of Hamburg. Naftali Tzvi adopted the surname of his maternal grandfather. He was the first Ropshitzer Rebbe. As a youth, Rabbi Naftali studied in the yeshiva of his uncle Rabbi Meshulam Igra, one of the Torah giants of the time, where his fellow students were Rabbi Mordechai Benet and Rabbi Yaakov Lorberbaum, who were to become two of the leading scholars of the next generation. Rabbi Naftali became attracted to the Hasidic movement, and traveled to the court of Rabbi Elimelech of Lizhensk
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Iyar
Iyar
Iyar
(Hebrew: אִייָר‎ or אִיָּר, Standard Iyyar Tiberian ʾIyyār ; from Akkadian ayyaru, meaning "Rosette; blossom") is the eighth month of the civil year (which starts on 1 Tishrei) and the second month of the ecclesiastical year (which starts on 1 Nisan) on the Hebrew calendar. The name is Babylonian in origin. It is a spring month of 29 days. Iyar
Iyar
usually falls in April–June on the Gregorian calendar. In the Hebrew Bible, before the Babylonian Exile, the month is called Ziv (1 Kings 6:1, 6:37)
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Elimelech Of Lizhensk
Elimelech Weisblum of Lizhensk (1717–March 11, 1787[1]), a Rabbi
Rabbi
and one of the great founding Rebbes of the Hasidic
Hasidic
movement, was known after his hometown, Leżajsk
Leżajsk
(Yiddish: ליזשענסק‎, translit. Lizhensk) near Rzeszów
Rzeszów
in Poland. He was part of the inner "Chevraya Kadisha" (Holy Society) school of the Maggid Rebbe
Rebbe
Dov Ber of Mezeritch (second leader of the Hasidic
Hasidic
movement), who became the decentralised, third generation leadership after the passing of Rebbe
Rebbe
Dov Ber in 1772. Their dissemination to new areas of Eastern Europe led the movement's rapid revivalist expansion. Rebbi Elimelech authored the classic work Noam Elimelech
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Orthodox Union
The Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America (UOJCA), more popularly known[Notes 1] as the Orthodox Union
Orthodox Union
(OU), is one of the oldest Orthodox Jewish organizations in the United States. It is best known for its kosher certification service. Its circled-U symbol, Ⓤ, a hechsher mark, is found on the labels of many kosher commercial and consumer food products. The OU supports a network of synagogues, youth programs, Jewish and Religious Zionist advocacy, programs for the disabled, localized religious study programs, and some international units with locations in Israel
Israel
and formerly in Ukraine. It is one of the largest Orthodox Jewish organizations in the United States
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Sukkot
Sukkot
Sukkot
(Hebrew: סוכות‎ or סֻכּוֹת, sukkōt, commonly translated as Feast of Tabernacles or Feast of the Ingathering, traditional Ashkenazi
Ashkenazi
pronunciation Sukkos or Succos, literally Feast of Booths) is a biblical Jewish holiday
Jewish holiday
celebrated on the 15th day of the seventh month, Tishrei
Tishrei
(varies from late September to late October). During the existence of the Jerusalem
Jerusalem
Temple, it was one of the Three Pilgrimage Festivals (Hebrew: שלוש רגלים‎, shalosh regalim) on which the Israelites
Israelites
were commanded to perform a pilgrimage to the Temple. Sukkot
Sukkot
has a double significance
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Sukkah
A sukkah or succah (/ˈsʊkə/; Sephardic
Sephardic
Hebrew Hebrew: סוכה‎, plural, סוכות sukkot ; sukkoth, often translated as "booth") is a temporary hut constructed for use during the week-long Jewish festival of Sukkot. It is topped with branches and often well decorated with autumnal, harvest or Judaic themes. The Book of Vayikra (Leviticus) describes it as a symbolic wilderness shelter, commemorating the time God provided for the Israelites in the wilderness they inhabited after they were freed from slavery in Egypt.[1] It is common for Jews to eat, sleep and otherwise spend time in the sukkah
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Tzadik
Tzadik/Zadik/Sadiq [tsaˈdik] (Hebrew: צדיק‬, "righteous one", pl. tzadikim [tsadiˈkim] צדיקים‬ ṣadiqim) is a title in Judaism
Judaism
given to people considered righteous, such as Biblical figures and later spiritual masters. The root of the word ṣadiq, is ṣ-d-q (צדק‬ tzedek), which means "justice" or "righteousness". The feminine term for a righteous person is tzadeikes/tzaddeket. Tzadik
Tzadik
is also the root of the word tzedakah ('charity', literally 'righteousness')
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Galicia (Central Europe)
Galicia (Ukrainian and Rusyn: Галичина, Halyčyna; Polish: Galicja; Czech and Slovak: Halič; German: Galizien; Hungarian: Galícia/Kaliz/Gácsország/Halics; Romanian: Galiția/Halici; Russian: Галиция, Galicija; Yiddish: גאַליציע‎ Galitsiye) is a historical and geographic region in Central Europe[1][2][3] once a small Kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia
Kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia
and later a crown land of Austria-Hungary, the Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria, that straddled the modern-day border between Poland
Poland
and Ukraine
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Poland
Coordinates: 52°N 20°E / 52°N 20°E / 52; 20 Republic
Republic
of Poland Rzeczpospolita
Rzeczpospolita
Polska  (
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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Yaakov Lorberbaum
Yaakov ben Yaakov Moshe Lorberbaum of Lissa (1760-1832) (known in English as Jacob ben Jacob Moses of Lissa, Jacob Lorberbaum or Jacob Lisser,[1] Hebrew: יעקב בן יעקב משה מליסא) was a Rabbi
Rabbi
and Posek. He is most commonly known as the "Ba'al HaChavas Da'as" or "Ba'al HaNesivos" for his most well-known works, or as the "Lissa Rav" for the city in which he was Chief Rabbi.Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 Jewish Encyclopedia
Jewish Encyclopedia
bibliography 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Rabbi
Rabbi
Lorberbaum was the great-grandson of the Chacham Tzvi, Rabbi
Rabbi
Zvi Ashkenazi;[1] he was therefore related to Rabbi
Rabbi
Jacob Emden
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OCLC
OCLC, currently incorporated as OCLC
OCLC
Online Computer Library Center, Incorporated,[3] is an American nonprofit cooperative organization "dedicated to the public purposes of furthering access to the world's information and reducing information costs".[4] It was founded in 1967 as the Ohio College Library Center. OCLC
OCLC
and its member libraries cooperatively produce and maintain WorldCat, the largest online public access catalog (OPAC) in the world
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Mordecai Benet
Mordecai ben Abraham Benet (Hebrew: מרדכי בן אברהם בנט‬, also Marcus Benedict; 1753–1829) was a Talmudist and chief rabbi of Moravia born at Csurgó, a small village in the county of Stuhlweissenburg, Hungary.Contents1 A gifted child 2 His works 3 Superiority of his style 4 Views on education 5 Opposes religious reform 6 Jewish Encyclopedia bibliography 7 ReferencesA gifted child[edit] As Benet's parents were very poor and consequently unable to engage a teacher, they sent their son when only 5 years old to his grandmother at Nikolsburg. There Gabriel Markbreiter provided for the tuition of the gifted child for a period of 6 years, and then sent him to Ettingen, Alsace, the rabbi of which place was Markbreiter's brother-in-law. The latter became Benet's teacher, and took great delight in his pupil's wonderful development
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Yeshiva
Yeshiva
Yeshiva
(/jəˈʃiːvə/; Hebrew: ישיבה‬, lit. "sitting"; pl. ישיבות‬, yeshivot or yeshivos) is a Jewish institution that focuses on the study of traditional religious texts, primarily the Talmud
Talmud
and the Torah. The studying is usually done through daily shiurim (lectures or classes) as well as in study pairs called ḥavrutas ( Aramaic
Aramaic
for "friendship"[1] or "companionship"[2]). Ḥavruta-style learning is one of the unique features of the yeshiva. In the United States and Israel, the different levels of yeshiva education have different names. In the United States, elementary-school students are enrolled in a yeshiva, post-bar mitzvah-age students learn in a metivta, and undergraduate-level students learn in a beit midrash or yeshiva gedola (Hebrew: ישיבה גדולה‎, lit. "large yeshiva" or "great yeshiva")
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Rebbe
Rebbe
Rebbe
(Hebrew: רבי‬: /ˈrɛbɛ/ or /ˈrɛbi/[1]) is a Yiddish word derived from the Hebrew word rabbi, which means "master, teacher, or mentor"
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Hamburg
Hamburg
Hamburg
(English: /ˈhæmbɜːrɡ/; German: [ˈhambʊɐ̯k] ( listen); locally: [ˈhambʊɪ̯ç] ( listen)), Low German/Low Saxon: Hamborg [ˈhambɔːç] ( listen), officially the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg
Hamburg
(German: Freie und Hansestadt Hamburg),[5] is the second-largest city of Germany
Germany
as well as one of the country's 16 constituent states, with a population of roughly 1.8 million people. The city lies at the core of the Hamburg Metropolitan Region
Hamburg Metropolitan Region
which spreads across four German federal states and is home to more than 5 million people. The official name reflects Hamburg's history as a member of the medieval Hanseatic League, a free imperial city of the Holy Roman Empire, a city-state and one of the 16 states of Germany. Before the 1871 Unification of Germany, it was a fully sovereign state
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