HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Mythago Wood
Mythago Wood
Mythago Wood
is a fantasy novel by British writer Robert Holdstock, published in the United Kingdom in 1984. The conception began as a short story written for the 1979 Milford Writer's Workshop; later a novella of the same name appeared in the September 1981 edition of The Magazine of Fantasy
Fantasy
& Science Fiction. The full-length novel retained the same name and was subsequently released, beginning a series of novels referred to collectively as the " Mythago Wood
Mythago Wood
cycle" or "Ryhope Wood series".[1] Mythago Wood
Mythago Wood
is set in Herefordshire, England, in and around a stand of ancient woodland, known as Ryhope Wood
[...More...]

"Mythago Wood" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Psychologist
A psychologist studies normal and abnormal mental states from cognitive, emotional, and social processes and behavior by observing, interpreting, and recording how individuals relate to one another and to their environments.[1] To become a psychologist, a person often completes a graduate university degree in psychology, but in most jurisdictions, members of other behavioral professions (such as counselors and psychiatrists) can also evaluate, diagnose, treat, and study mental processes.[2]Contents1 Professional practice1.1 Clinical psychologists 1.2 Contrasted with psychiatrists2 Licensing and regulations2.1 Australia 2.2 Belgium 2.3 Finland 2.4 Germany 2.5 Greece 2.6 The Netherlands 2.7 New Zealand 2.8 South Africa 2.9 Sweden 2.10 United Kingdom2.10.1 Employment2.11 United States and Canada2.11.1 Regulation 2.11.2 Schooling 2.11.3 Licensure 2.11.4 Employment3 See also 4 References 5 External linksProfessional pract
[...More...]

"Psychologist" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Herne The Hunter
In English folklore, Herne the Hunter
Herne the Hunter
is a ghost associated with Windsor Forest and Great Park in the English county of Berkshire. He is said to wear antlers upon his head, ride a horse, torment cattle, and rattle chains
[...More...]

"Herne The Hunter" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Abyss (religion)
In religion, an abyss is a bottomless pit, or also a chasm that may lead to the underworld or hell. In the Septuagint, or Greek version of the Hebrew Bible, the word represents both the original unfinished creation (Genesis 1:2) and the Hebrew tehom ("a surging water-deep"), which is used also in apocalyptic and kabbalistic literature and in the New Testament
New Testament
for hell; the place of punishment; in the Revised version of the Bible "abyss" is generally used for this idea
[...More...]

"Abyss (religion)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chthonic
Chthonic
Chthonic
(UK: /ˈkθɒnɪk/, US: /ˈθɒnɪk/ from Ancient Greek: χθόνιος, translit. khthonios [kʰtʰónios], "in, under, or beneath the earth", from χθών khthōn "earth")[1] literally means "subterranean", but the word in English describes deities or spirits of the underworld, especially in Ancient Greek religion
[...More...]

"Chthonic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Resonator
A resonator is a device or system that exhibits resonance or resonant behavior, that is, it naturally oscillates at some frequencies, called its resonant frequencies, with greater amplitude than at others. The oscillations in a resonator can be either electromagnetic or mechanical (including acoustic). Resonators are used to either generate waves of specific frequencies or to select specific frequencies from a signal. Musical instruments use acoustic resonators that produce sound waves of specific tones. Another example is quartz crystals used in electronic devices such as radio transmitters and quartz watches to produce oscillations of very precise frequency. A cavity resonator is one in which waves exist in a hollow space inside the device. In electronics and radio, microwave cavities consisting of hollow metal boxes are used in microwave transmitters, receivers and test equipment to control frequency, in place of the tuned circuits which are used at lower frequencies
[...More...]

"Resonator" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Memory
Memory
Memory
is the faculty of the mind by which information is encoded, stored, and retrieved. Memory
Memory
is vital to experiences and related to limbic systems, it is the retention of information over time for the purpose of influencing future action.[1] If we could not remember past events, we could not learn or develop language, relationships, nor personal identity (Eysenck, 2012). Often memory is understood as an informational processing system with explicit and implicit functioning that is made up of a sensory processor, short-term (or working) memory, and long-term memory (Baddely, 2007).[better source needed] This can be related to the neuron
[...More...]

"Memory" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Myth
Myth
Myth
is a folklore genre consisting of narratives that are ostensibly historical, though often supernatural, explaining the origins of a cultural practice or natural phenomenon.[3] The word "myth" is derived from the Greek word mythos (μῦθος), which simply means "story". Mythology
Mythology
can refer either to the study of myths, or to a body or collection of myths.[4] Myth
Myth
can mean 'sacred story', 'traditional narrative' or 'tale of the gods'. A myth can also be a story to explain why something exists.[5] Human cultures' mythologies usually include a cosmogonical or creation myth, concerning the origins of the world, or how the world came to exist. The active beings in myths are generally gods and goddesses, heroes and heroines, or animals and plants. Most myths are set in a timeless past before recorded time or beginning of the critical history
[...More...]

"Myth" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Subconscious
In psychology, the word subconscious is the part of consciousness that is not currently in focal awareness
[...More...]

"Subconscious" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mind
The mind is a set of cognitive faculties including consciousness, perception, thinking, judgement, language and memory
[...More...]

"Mind" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

King Arthur
King Arthur
Arthur
is a legendary British leader who, according to medieval histories and romances, led the defence of Britain against Saxon invaders in the late 5th and early 6th centuries AD. The details of Arthur's story are mainly composed of folklore and literary invention, and his historical existence is debated and disputed by modern historians.[2] The sparse historical background of Arthur
Arthur
is gleaned from various sources, including the Annales Cambriae, the Historia Brittonum, and the writings of Gildas. Arthur's name also occurs in early poetic sources such as Y Gododdin.[3] Arthur
Arthur
is a central figure in the legends making up the Matter of Britain
[...More...]

"King Arthur" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Robin Hood
Robin Hood
Robin Hood
is a legendary heroic outlaw originally depicted in English folklore and subsequently featured in literature and film. According to legend, he was a highly skilled archer and swordsman. In some versions of the legend he is depicted as being of noble birth, and having fought in the Crusades
Crusades
before returning to England
England
to find his lands have been taken by the Sheriff. In other versions this is not the case and he is instead born into the yeoman class. Traditionally depicted dressed in Lincoln green, he is said to have robbed from the rich and given to the poor. Through retellings, additions, and variations a body of familiar characters associated with Robin Hood
Robin Hood
have been created. These include his paramour, Maid Marian, his band of outlaws, the Merry Men, and his chief opponent, the Sheriff of Nottingham
[...More...]

"Robin Hood" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Archetype
The concept of an archetype /ˈɑːrkɪtaɪp/ appears in areas relating to behavior, modern psychological theory, and literary analysis. An archetype can be:a statement, pattern of behavior, or prototype (model) which other statements, patterns of behavior, and objects copy or emulate. (Frequently used informal synonyms for this usage include "standard example", "basic example", and the longer form "archetypal example". Mathematical archetypes often appear as "canonical examples".) a Platonic philosophical idea referring to pure forms which embody the fundamental characteristics of a thing in Platonism a collectively-inherited unconscious idea, pattern of thought, image, etc., that is universally present, in individual psyches, as in Jungian psychology a constantly recurring symbol or motif in literature, painting, or mythology (this usage of the term draws from both comparative anthropology and from Jungian archetypal theory)
[...More...]

"Archetype" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fantasy Literature
Fantasy
Fantasy
literature is literature set in an imaginary universe, often but not always without any locations, events, or people from the real world
[...More...]

"Fantasy Literature" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Wormhole
A wormhole is a concept that represents a solution of the Einstein field equations: a non-trivial resolution of the Ehrenfest paradox structure linking separate points in spacetime. A wormhole can be visualized as a tunnel with two ends, each at separate points in spacetime (i.e., different locations and/or different points of time), or by a transcendental bijection of the spacetime continuum
[...More...]

"Wormhole" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Time Travel
Time
Time
travel is the concept of movement between certain points in time, analogous to movement between different points in space by an object or a person, typically using a hypothetical device known as a time machine, in the form of a vehicle or of a portal connecting distant points in spacetime, either to an earlier time or to a later time, without the need for the time-traveling body to experience the intervening period in the usual sense. Time
Time
travel is a widely-recognized concept in philosophy and fiction. It was popularized by H. G. Wells' 1895 novel The Time
Time
Machine, which moved the concept of time travel into the public imagination. However, it is uncertain if time travel to the past is physically possible
[...More...]

"Time Travel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.