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Musulamii
The Musulamii
Musulamii
were a confederation of the Berber Gaetulian tribes,[1] who inhabited the desert regions of what is today known as Chotts Regions in Tunisia
Tunisia
and Algeria, as well as the Roman province of Mauretania Caesariensis, which was annexed to the Roman empire in 44 AD
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Hadrian
Hadrian
Hadrian
(/ˈheɪdriən/; Latin: Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus; 24 January 76 – 10 July 138 AD) was Roman emperor
Roman emperor
from 117 to 138.[note 1] He was born Publius Aelius Hadrianus, probably at Italica, near Santiponce
Santiponce
(in modern-day Spain), into a Hispano-Roman family with centuries-old roots in Hispania. His father was a maternal first cousin of the emperor Trajan. Some years before Hadrian's accession, he married Trajan's grand-niece, Vibia Sabina. Trajan's wife and Empress, Pompeia Plotina, and his close friend and adviser Licinius Sura, were well disposed towards Hadrian
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Tunisia
Islam
Islam
(state religion; 99.1% Sunni[9] others (1%; including Christian, Jewish, Shia, Bahá'í)[9]Demonym TunisianGovernment Unitary semi-presidential republic[12][13]• PresidentBeji Caid Essebsi• Head of GovernmentYoussef ChahedLegislature Assembly of the Representatives of the PeopleFormation•  Husainid Dynasty
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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Oxford University Press
Oxford
Oxford
University Press (OUP) is the largest university press in the world,[1] and the second oldest after Cambridge University
Cambridge University
Press. It is a department of the University of Oxford
University of Oxford
and is governed by a group of 15 academics appointed by the vice-chancellor known as the delegates of the press. They are headed by the secretary to the delegates, who serves as OUP's chief executive and as its major representative on other university bodies
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Roman North Africa
French Algeria
Algeria
(19th - 20th centuries)French conquest French governorsResistance PacificationEmir Abdelkader Fatma N'SoumerMokrani Revolt Cheikh BouamamaNationalism RCUA FLN GPRAAlgerian War 1958 putsch 1961 putschÉvian Accords Independence referendumPied-Noir Harkis Oujda GroupContemporary era 1960s–80sArab nationalism 1965 putschBerber Spring 1988 Riots1990s
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Roman Road
Roman roads
Roman roads
(Latin: viae Romanae; singular: Via Romana meaning Roman way) were physical infrastructure vital to the maintenance and development of the Roman state, and were built from about 300 BC through the expansion and consolidation of the Roman Republic
Roman Republic
and the Roman Empire.[1] They provided efficient means for the overland movement of armies, officials, and civilians, and the inland carriage of official communications and trade goods.[2] Roman roads
Roman roads
were of several kinds, ranging from small local roads to broad, long-distance highways built to connect cities, major towns and military bases. These major roads were often stone-paved and metaled, cambered for drainage, and were flanked by footpaths, bridleways and drainage ditches. They were laid along accurately surveyed courses, and some were cut through hills, or conducted over rivers and ravines on bridgework
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Ammaedara
Haïdra
Haïdra
(Arabic: حيدرة‎) is a municipality in western Tunisia, containing the ruins of Ammaedara, one of the oldest Roman cities in Africa. It was a diocese and is now a Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
titular see.Contents1 History 2 Ecclesiastical history2.1 Titular see3 Notable people 4 References 5 Source and External linksHistory[edit] Ammaedara was on the border between the valleys and the Berber tribes and was part of the Roman province
Roman province
of Byzacena. The Third Augustan Legion (Legio III Augusta) was installed in Ammaedara in 30 BC where they built their first fortress
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Theveste
Theveste
Theveste
was a Roman-Berber colony situated in the present Tébessa, Algeria.[1]Contents1 History 2 Main architectural remains 3 Notes 4 Bibliography 5 See alsoHistory[edit] In 146 BC, the Romans conquered the region, where existed an old city called "Tbessa". Theveste
Theveste
was founded by the Romans in 75 AD near an old Berber village located next to the Aurès Mountains, in order to control the mountain region. During the 1st century CE, the Legio III Augusta
Legio III Augusta
[2] resided there before being transferred to Lambaesis. It was made a colonia probably under Trajan.[3] Theveste
Theveste
flourished under Septimius Severus
Septimius Severus
reaching a population calculated in nearly 30,000 inhabitants, and was even an important Dioceses See. There is mention of a council held there by the Donatists
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Sicca Veneria
Sicca means dryness
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Junius Blaesus
Quintus Junius Blaesus (died AD 31) was a Roman novus homo ("new man," that is, the first member of his family to gain entrance to the Roman nobility)[dubious – discuss] who lived during the reigns of Augustus and Tiberius. He was the maternal uncle of Lucius Aelius Sejanus, the Praetorian Prefect
Praetorian Prefect
of Emperor
Emperor
Tiberius.Contents1 Career 2 Marriage and Family 3 See also 4 Footnotes 5 References 6 External linksCareer[edit] Almost nothing is known of the career of Quintus Junius Blaesus prior to AD 10, when he served as suffect consul with Servius Cornelius Lentulus Maluginensis
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Mauretania Caesariensis
Mauretania
Mauretania
Caesariensis ( Latin
Latin
for "Caesarian Mauretania") was a Roman province located in what is now Algeria
Algeria
in the Maghreb
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Algeria
Coordinates: 28°N 2°E / 28°N 2°E / 28; 2People's Democratic Republic
Republic
of Algeriaالجمهورية الجزائرية الديمقراطية الشعبية (Arabic)République Algérienne Démocratique et Populaire  (French) Flag Emblem Motto: بالشّعب وللشّعب("By the people and for the people")[1][2]Anthem: Kassaman(English: "We Pledge")Location of Algeria (dark green)Capitaland largest cityAlgiers36°42′N 3°13′E / 36.700°N 3.21
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Garamantes
The Garamantes
Garamantes
(possibly from the Berber igherman / iɣerman, meaning: "cities" in modern Berber; or possibly from igerramen meaning "saints, holy/sacred people" in modern Berber) were a Berber tribe who developed an advanced civilization in ancient southwestern Libya. They used an elaborate underground irrigation system, and founded prosperous Berber kingdoms or city-states in the Fezzan
Fezzan
area of Libya, in the Sahara
Sahara
desert. They were a local power between 500 BC and 700 AD. There is little textual information about the Garamantes, but their written language was "...a still nearly indecipherable proto-Tifaniq, the script of modern-day Tuaregs."[1] Even the name Garamantes
Garamantes
was a Greek name, which the Romans later adopted
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Third Augustan Legion
Legio tertia Augusta ("Third Augustan Legion") was a legion of the Imperial Roman army. Its origin may have been the Republican 3rd Legion which served the general Pompey
Pompey
during his civil war against Gaius Julius Caesar (49–45 BC). It supported the general Octavian (later emperor Augustus) in his civil war against Mark Antony
Mark Antony
(31–30 BC). It was officially refounded in 30 BC, when Octavian achieved sole mastery of the Roman empire
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Gaetuli
Gaetuli
Gaetuli
was the romanised name of an ancient Berber tribe inhabiting Getulia. The latter district covered the large desert region south of the Atlas Mountains, bordering the Sahara. Other documents place Gaetulia in pre-Roman times along the Mediterranean coasts of what is now Algeria
Algeria
and Tunisia, and north of the Atlas. The Zenatas are believed to be descendants of the Gaetuli.Contents1 Region 2 Roman Perceptions 3 History 4 Culture4.1 Lifestyle 4.2 Language 4.3 Economy 4.4 Religion5 See also 6 ReferencesRegion[edit]Map locating Getulia south of Mauretania.Getulia was the name given to an ancient district in the Maghreb, which in the usage of Roman writers comprised the nomadic Berber tribes of the southern slopes of the Aures Mountains
Aures Mountains
and Atlas Mountains, as far as the Atlantic, and the oases in the northern part of the Sahara
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